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Volt Droop - Page 2

post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Duke View Post
I bet if you have the patience to watch the voltage when full loading there will be an additional drop... I noticed that on some systems where as under full load a first drop will occur then occasionally and slight second temporary drop will occur and the likes of Orthos or Prime will fail.
Solution, usually, slightly more vcore.
I was running my Vcore at 1.475 at 3Ghz. That was my first 12 hour run. Then on second run I used the same Vcore and crashed 15 minutes into it. I have upped the volts since then. I'll have to check that when I get a day off work.
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post #12 of 21
The newest version of OCCT syncs with a hardware monitoring application (for example, Everest Ultimate, if you have it installed on your system) and graphs the voltage fluctuations that ensue when stress testing your system. I find this to be particularly useful when trying to identify the minimum VCore necessary for a stable overclock.

Most motherboard manufacturers have actually built VDroop into the system as part of protecting the CPUs from voltage spikes. It is not a defect; rather, it is an engineered solution for a very dangerous consequence of increased voltage injection into our systems' components.

Here is an excellent document explaining VDroop in more technical detail.

I've also included a couple of graphs generated by OCCT illustrating VDroop in action.




Edited by txtmstrjoe - 6/16/08 at 8:43pm
    
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post #13 of 21
Joe, nice link!

Guardian, did you happen to measure the voltages while you were stress testng? I'd recommend measuring the voltages with a multimeter during the test. Yes this is safe to do...I've actually done it many times just make sure you don't short anything out.

Good luck
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post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by thlnk3r View Post
Joe, nice link!

Guardian, did you happen to measure the voltages while you were stress testng? I'd recommend measuring the voltages with a multimeter during the test. Yes this is safe to do...I've actually done it many times just make sure you don't short anything out.

Good luck
Where are the measuring points?
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post #15 of 21
AMD doesnt have issues at all with Vdroop...only Intel and by that it really isnt a issue at all...it's the design of the CPU power requirement...

People are so used to seeing steady voltages they still freak when on an Intel the voltage isnt what it's set to...it has more to do with amperage than actual voltage and keeping the chip alive...

AMD doesnt require or use anything like this so a little droop is in the boards power regulation....I have yet to experience an issue from droop at all...

FYI...most Biostar boards actually rise in voltage under load to aid in stability...again built into the power regulation of the board... more so by accident than anything I would think...
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post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by BenBrown View Post
Where are the measuring points?
Ben, I'm using this thread as a reference: http://www.clunk.org.uk/forums/guide...ing-guide.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_bowtie View Post
FYI...most Biostar boards actually rise in voltage under load to aid in stability...again built into the power regulation of the board... more so by accident than anything I would think...
Bowtie, if that is "built" in then how would that be an accident? Sorry a little confused
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post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by txtmstrjoe View Post
The newest version of OCCT syncs with a hardware monitoring application (for example, Everest Ultimate, if you have it installed on your system) and graphs the voltage fluctuations that ensue when stress testing your system. I find this to be particularly useful when trying to identify the minimum VCore necessary for a stable overclock.

Most motherboard manufacturers have actually built VDroop into the system as part of protecting the CPUs from voltage spikes. It is not a defect; rather, it is an engineered solution for a very dangerous consequence of increased voltage injection into our systems' components.

Here is an excellent document explaining VDroop in more technical detail.

I've also included a couple of graphs generated by OCCT illustrating VDroop in action.
Thanks Joe, I will post some screenies as soon as I can

Quote:
Originally Posted by thlnk3r View Post
Joe, nice link!

Guardian, did you happen to measure the voltages while you were stress testng? I'd recommend measuring the voltages with a multimeter during the test. Yes this is safe to do...I've actually done it many times just make sure you don't short anything out.

Good luck
Yes I did with OCCT as Joe suggested. I will be running the test again Wednesday when I have more free time. I did however notice a drop during load. Between 97%-99% then is crashed shortly after. The same happened with Prime95. This still maybe a heat issue thou and I can't rule that out yet. I'll keep you guys updated

EDIT: I'm also going to add that during the Orthos and Prime95 test last night, It seemed one of my cores is getting errors while other keeps continuing the test. Does this mean I have a bad chip on my hands which could be causing all this instability?
Edited by GuardianOdin - 6/17/08 at 2:31pm
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post #18 of 21
Well, you got my attention. I have the same sort of problem on the M2N-SLi Deluxe with a nForce 570 SLI chipset. The BIOS voltage can go as high as 1.5625V but in actuality I cannot get voltage any higher than 1.45V. On top of that, when the CPU goes under load the voltage drops by as much as 0.04V-0.05V and often this causes me to fall to or at 1.4V killing my OC ability. So far I have not been able to find a resolution to this anywhere. The highest I have been able to push my 5000BE is 3.2GHz completely stable. If I could prevent the voltage from dropping below 1.45V I could get as high as 3.3GHz, or even 3.4GHz with 1.5V, but the voltage will not stay steady. I know this because I can boot at 1.45V at both 3.3GHz and 3.4GHz but as soon as I bench the voltage drops and test crashes. It is very annoying. Anybody knows a solution?
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post #19 of 21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dejanh View Post
Well, you got my attention. I have the same sort of problem on the M2N-SLi Deluxe with a nForce 570 SLI chipset. The BIOS voltage can go as high as 1.5625V but in actuality I cannot get voltage any higher than 1.45V. On top of that, when the CPU goes under load the voltage drops by as much as 0.04V-0.05V and often this causes me to fall to or at 1.4V killing my OC ability. So far I have not been able to find a resolution to this anywhere. The highest I have been able to push my 5000BE is 3.2GHz completely stable. If I could prevent the voltage from dropping below 1.45V I could get as high as 3.3GHz, or even 3.4GHz with 1.5V, but the voltage will not stay steady. I know this because I can boot at 1.45V at both 3.3GHz and 3.4GHz but as soon as I bench the voltage drops and test crashes. It is very annoying. Anybody knows a solution?
I'm starting think that this may be a more common occurrence than people think.
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post #20 of 21
Quite likely. I do not know if this is by design because a 0.04V - 0.05V drop seems too much. If it was 0.01V - 0.02V I could even understand it, but the former is extremely high. The only way that I know to get around it is to physically mod the board to control the vcore externally and then crank it up high enough so that the drop cannot affect my stability. For example, I could externally set the voltage to 1.6V, which will give me 1.55V in actuality, but I would rather not do this mod and/or juice up my CPU with 1.6V unnecessarily.

I think this is all due to poor design on the boards and has nothing to do with what is needed for "safe" CPU operation, moreover since some people have gotten rid of such severe drops by changing boards.
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