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slackware help

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
i just installed slackware, but when i type "xorgsetup" or "xorgconfig" it says command not found


I tried reinstalling, and it still does this...
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tratium
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post #2 of 7
You need to run these commands as root. Unlike in Ubuntu, there is a root user (this user you will create after the installation).
post #3 of 7
Yep, evenorbi is right. Most distros allow a true superuser. Ubuntu, by default, does not (one reason I don't use Ubuntu). Being a newb friendly distro, I understand why Ubtunu does this, but it is annoying once you become more familiar with terminal commands.

To perform your root duties, open a terminal and type: su

then enter your root password. This gives you a root shell. You can then perform as much "root stuff" as you want without having to type "sudo" on every command.

Just be sure to close this shell whenever you finish doing whatever it is you need to do. Unlike in Ubuntu, you don't use sudo (unless you specifically set up a sudoers file, but this is usually only needed if someone else is using your machine who might need occasional root privileges. You give them a sudo account so they can perform certain root functions without having "true" superuser rights and the true root password).
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post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post
then enter your root password. This gives you a root shell. You can then perform as much "root stuff" as you want without having to type "sudo" on every command.
Well, sudo doesn't need to be run from a root user. sudo is the command to temporarily run root commands, from your user, rather than the root. When you are root you don't need to type sudo before commands.

Using sudo:
Code:
pap3r|UBox|~$ nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf
You would be able to view the file, but not make changes, as it is a root file. To make changes, you simply need to add sudo in front of the command.
Code:
pap3r|UBox|~$ sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf
Now you're able to change the document anyway you like. DON'T THOUGH! Your xorg.conf file is ubeer important, so don't change it unless you know what you are doing, or a program is doing it.

Using su:
Code:
pap3r|UBox|~$ xorgsetup
Command not found (or it might say) Root privileges are required to run this command
In that case, all you need to do is run
Code:
pap3r|UBox|~$ su
Root password:
root@UBox:~#
Then run whatever command is necessary. Most of the time working in root is unnecessary. You can get by 90% of the time using sudo, and that's much safer, too. I recommend using sudo, as I'm sure most other people will too. If you use su a lot, think about this. If you install a program from su, tar xzvf blah blah blah, that unzipped file belongs to root, not you. I learned this the hard way when I first updated slackware with all of the updates. I was in su the entire time. Had to do a reinstall

Just be careful using su, sudo is normally all you need.
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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
well i installed bluewhite64 and it fixed it, but i decided slackware was too hard for me, so im back to ubuntu

thanks anyway!
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tratium
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post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pap3r View Post
Then run whatever command is necessary. Most of the time working in root is unnecessary. You can get by 90% of the time using sudo, and that's much safer, too. I recommend using sudo, as I'm sure most other people will too. If you use su a lot, think about this. If you install a program from su, tar xzvf blah blah blah, that unzipped file belongs to root, not you. I learned this the hard way when I first updated slackware with all of the updates. I was in su the entire time. Had to do a reinstall

Just be careful using su, sudo is normally all you need.
A few tricks with chmod -R may have been able to fix that for you.

But yeah setting up sudo is usually better then just logging into the root account.
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post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by dangerousHobo View Post
A few tricks with chmod -R may have been able to fix that for you.

But yeah setting up sudo is usually better then just logging into the root account.
Yep, I knew nothing of chmod back then, I started on slack, and eventually figured out why people use sudo...
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