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Overclocking

Before following any instructions bear in mind that Overclocking is dangerous and can damage components if not carried out correctly.

What is overclocking?
Overclocking is when you change the speed of the CPU to a higher one set by the manufacture.

Changing the settings that have been desired by the manufactures will end up in them working to a higher speed and performance. If you Overclock them too much the components may get damaged and not function properly.

Understanding Overclocking
To work out the speed of a CPU you simply times the Bus Rate by the Multiplier. Simple? No. There is a whole lot more to overclocking the CPU though. They will be explained and split up into categories so they're fully understandable.

Bus Rate
To work out the bus rate of a CPU take the FSB and divide it by four. Why divide by four? Intel CPU's are 'quad pumped'. So say a 200MHz Bus Rate will be 'quad pumped' so that the FSB will be 800MHz. This makes the CPU process data a whole lot faster than just having the normal 200MHz. FSB or Front Side Bus is the main part of the CPU. It processes each of the computer components and decides how much speed they need. When this has been calculated this then gets transmitted to the actual CPU so that it can process and transmit the required data.

Multiplier
The multiplier is what is multiplied to the Bus Rate to get the CPU speed. This is a 'locked' number and can't be changed on nearly every modern CPU today. Seems we can't change the multiplier to Overclock the CPU we will have to change the Bus Rate in order to achieve a higher CPU speed.

Bus Rate vs. Multiplier
Say if we can change both the Bus Rate and the Multiplier, which one do we change or if not both? Take a 2.0GHz CPU. If it's been set by the bus rate being 200MHz and the multiplier being 10 this will give us 2000MHz (2GHz). 2.0GHz is also available by having the Bus Rate at 100MHz and the multiplier being 20. This will still give us 2000MHz (2.0GHz). Another possible way of achieving 2GHz is to set the Bus Rate to 250MHz and the Multiplier to 8.
So which is better? Having the Bus Rate higher than the default manufacture or to have the Multiplier higher than the default?
Answer
Bus Rate is the better option to take as I've said in this article that the Bus Rate is the main part of the CPU. It processes all of the information that it receives. Even though you get 2.0GHz either way you set it, having the Bus Rate higher will deliver a fast and better performance.

How/Where to Overclock
Entering the BIOS will be the best place to go to Overclock the CPU. You will only be able to Overclock through the BIOS if your motherboard can support it. If your motherboard doesn't support Overclocking you can try downloading programs made for Overclocking. I will be focusing on Overclocking through the BIOS as this will be the best and easiest way. To enter BIOS hit either 'Delete' 'F1', 'F2' or any of the other 'F' keys. When your computer boots it'll say which key to press to enter BIOS. BIOS can also be referred to as 'Setup'.
I will be referring to the AsRock 4Core Dual Motherboard to Overclock a CPU. To enter BIOS using this Motherboard press 'F2' when booting.
There will be a Menu to Overclock your CPU. Refer to the Motherboard Manual to find out how to locate this.

Example
Now we're going to calculate what Bus Rate and Multiplier we need to have if we're going to safely Overclock a CPU.
I'm going to demonstrate how to Overclock an Intel Core 2 Duo E4500 from 2.2GHz to 3.3GHz.
I will be using the AsRock 4Core Dual Motherboard to explain this.
The FSB for the Intel E4500 is 800MHz so we divide that by four as its 'quad pumped' which leaves up with a 200MHz Bus Rate. This is what we'll be changing as the Multiplier has been not accessible to change as it's been locked to a certain number since 1998.
The settings that this CPU has now are the Bus Rate being 200MHz and the Multiplier being 11.
Leaving the Multiplier as it is at 11 we will change the Bus Rate from 200MHz to 300MHz. (300MHz * 11 = 3300MHz = 3.3GHz)
Obviously changing the speed of the CPU will result in the CPU processing more data in turn will make the CPU hotter. Correct cooling is required in order to achieve safe Overclocking. Water Cooling is recommended to ensure correct temperature.
The Intel E4500 maximum temperature is 73.3oc. The highest I've got it is 51oc when it's been overclocked to 2.7GHz. Average temperature hovers around 28-35oc. Taking into account I only have Air Cooling not Water Cooling.

VCore
VCore is the voltage that the PSU gives the CPU. When Overclocking the CPU it'll need more power as it's running at a higher speed. With the AsRock 4Core Dual Motherboard the VCore changes accordingly to how much I Overclock it. Some Motherboards don't do this so it's vital that you change the VCore manually. Failing in doing this can result in crashes, freezes, not booting or damage to the CPU and Motherboard. The VCore is very accurate and the Intel E4500 I used earlier can handle a voltage of 0.962V - 1.325v. If you Overclock the CPU and it can boot and post to Windows with no problems and can run for hours then there's no need changing the amount of voltage the CPU gets. If you do experience crashes or freezing after overclocking higher the VCore every little bit you can then reboot. If you still experience problems higher the VCore the next minimum change it can do until you can boot and post and run Windows with no problems. It can be a long time until you get the right voltage but the outcome is not arguable.


u can copy this anywhere, edit, take credit, whatever
Deepthought
(17 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 (OC-3GHz{334x9}-1.24375v) Asus P5Q Pro Turbo GIGABYTE AMD Radeon HD 6850  OCZ 4GB Reaper HPC / Dual Ch. DDR2 PC6400 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
OCZ Vertex 4 Seagate Barracuda 7200.9 SATA Seagate Barracuda 7200.9 SATA LG HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GSA-H42N SCSI DVD+RW/DVD-RAm 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme Windows 8 Pro x64 LG E2260V-PN Microsoft SideWinder X6 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
Thermaltake Toughpower W0103 600-Watt ATX 12V 2.2 Antec Performance One P182 Microsoft SideWinder X8 Logitech ClearChat Comfort USB Headset (H390) 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7-4500U Dell XPS 12-9Q33 Intel HD Graphics 4400 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOSMonitor
SAMSUNG SSD SM841 mSATA 256GB Windows 8.1 64Bit 1080p Dell, 10 Point Touch 
CPURAMHard DriveOS
Intel Atom Z2420 1GB 16GB Android 4.1 
MonitorPowerOther
7" Touchscreen LED Backlight WXGA (1280x800) IP... 16Wh Li-polymer Battery GPS & Glonass,G-Sensor, E-compass, Proximity, A... 
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Deepthought
(17 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 (OC-3GHz{334x9}-1.24375v) Asus P5Q Pro Turbo GIGABYTE AMD Radeon HD 6850  OCZ 4GB Reaper HPC / Dual Ch. DDR2 PC6400 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
OCZ Vertex 4 Seagate Barracuda 7200.9 SATA Seagate Barracuda 7200.9 SATA LG HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GSA-H42N SCSI DVD+RW/DVD-RAm 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme Windows 8 Pro x64 LG E2260V-PN Microsoft SideWinder X6 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
Thermaltake Toughpower W0103 600-Watt ATX 12V 2.2 Antec Performance One P182 Microsoft SideWinder X8 Logitech ClearChat Comfort USB Headset (H390) 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7-4500U Dell XPS 12-9Q33 Intel HD Graphics 4400 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOSMonitor
SAMSUNG SSD SM841 mSATA 256GB Windows 8.1 64Bit 1080p Dell, 10 Point Touch 
CPURAMHard DriveOS
Intel Atom Z2420 1GB 16GB Android 4.1 
MonitorPowerOther
7" Touchscreen LED Backlight WXGA (1280x800) IP... 16Wh Li-polymer Battery GPS & Glonass,G-Sensor, E-compass, Proximity, A... 
  hide details  
Reply