New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Strange question...

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
True or false: the faster a computer can calculate long division problems, the higher the overall performance.

This is a question on my take-home test and the professor never went over this as well as I am having a horrible time finding the answer. Thanks.
My First Build
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II 940 Biostar 790GX A2+ Powercolor Radeon HD 7870 2x2GB Dominators Stock Clocks 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
SAMSUNG 840 SSD 128GB Windows 7 (64 bit) HP w2207 Corsair 750W 
CaseMouseAudio
Antec 300 Logitech G5 On Board 
  hide details  
Reply
My First Build
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II 940 Biostar 790GX A2+ Powercolor Radeon HD 7870 2x2GB Dominators Stock Clocks 
Hard DriveOSMonitorPower
SAMSUNG 840 SSD 128GB Windows 7 (64 bit) HP w2207 Corsair 750W 
CaseMouseAudio
Antec 300 Logitech G5 On Board 
  hide details  
Reply
post #2 of 7
There are a lot of factors that can determine a system's overall performance. But yeah, I'd say long division would do it.
HP Pavilion dm1z
(13 items)
 
  
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Fusion E-350 Radeon HD 6310M 8GB Corsair DDR3 Western Digital Scorpio Black 750GB 
OSMonitor
Windows 7 Home Premium 11.6" 
  hide details  
Reply
HP Pavilion dm1z
(13 items)
 
  
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Fusion E-350 Radeon HD 6310M 8GB Corsair DDR3 Western Digital Scorpio Black 750GB 
OSMonitor
Windows 7 Home Premium 11.6" 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 7
Well I would think faster = more performance. I mean, there are other factors when determining overall system performance, but for pure mathematics, faster would be better.
post #4 of 7
A better measure would be floating point calculations which were decisive between AMD and Intel for a number of years.

To answer your question would be yes. SuperPi, if you haven't heard of it, is a program which calculates PI to various decimal places. The faster the system the better overall score with regard to time.
Legendary
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E6750 ASUS P5B Deluxe XFX 8600GT 2 x 2GB G.Skill PQ 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Seagate 250GB Windows 7 x64 Samsung 225BW Saitek Eclipse 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
PC P&C Quad 750W Silencer Thermaltake Tsunami Dream Logitech MX518 Func 1030 
  hide details  
Reply
Legendary
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E6750 ASUS P5B Deluxe XFX 8600GT 2 x 2GB G.Skill PQ 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Seagate 250GB Windows 7 x64 Samsung 225BW Saitek Eclipse 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
PC P&C Quad 750W Silencer Thermaltake Tsunami Dream Logitech MX518 Func 1030 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 7
that logic makes sense
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5-430M Intel HM55 Mobility Radeon HD 5650 4 GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Seagate Momentus XT DVD Super Multi Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 15.6" 
PowerMouse
6-Cell Lithium-Ion (4400 mAh) Logitech G7 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5-430M Intel HM55 Mobility Radeon HD 5650 4 GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Seagate Momentus XT DVD Super Multi Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 15.6" 
PowerMouse
6-Cell Lithium-Ion (4400 mAh) Logitech G7 
  hide details  
Reply
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLegend View Post
A better measure would be floating point calculations which were decisive between AMD and Intel for a number of years.

To answer your question would be yes. SuperPi, if you haven't heard of it, is a program which calculates PI to various decimal places. The faster the system the better overall score with regard to time.
Long division would use the integer functional units, which is more reflective of real world performance. Floating point is slower and less common in real code.
It goes to eleven
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E6300 DS3 EVGA 8600GTS 2GB XMS2 DDR2-800 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
1.294 TB Arch Linux/XP Samsung 226bw Eclipse II 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair 520HX Lian-Li v1000B Plus G7 
  hide details  
Reply
It goes to eleven
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E6300 DS3 EVGA 8600GTS 2GB XMS2 DDR2-800 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
1.294 TB Arch Linux/XP Samsung 226bw Eclipse II 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair 520HX Lian-Li v1000B Plus G7 
  hide details  
Reply
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiteCrane View Post
True or false: the faster a computer can calculate long division problems, the higher the overall performance.
How is "overall performance" measured? The measurement used determines the level of performance using that metric. You can come up with a number of different tests that people would subjectively call an overall performance metric, and show results where the system with a faster long-division calculation has worse performance on the overall metric. The answer is "not necessarily" and therefore false.

I don't consider this a good question, because it really is asking you to guess at the instructor's assumptions. All things remaining equal, this statement is true. In general, given two "comparable systems", the statement is also true (which means not always, but usually true). But since he hasn't stated his assumptions, you have to ask yourself is he a detail-oriented kind of guy, or does he like generalizations?

The faster a computer can calculate long division problems, the higher the overall performance of long division calculation. Now THAT'S true.

"There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics."
- Mark Twain et al
    
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel 2.4 Core i7 AMD Radeon HD 6750M 8 GB 1067 MHz DDR3 750 GB 
OS
Mac OS-X Lion 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel 2.4 Core i7 AMD Radeon HD 6750M 8 GB 1067 MHz DDR3 750 GB 
OS
Mac OS-X Lion 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Coding and Programming