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Wierdo124's MASSIVE Guide To Intel Processors

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Wierdo124’s Massive guide to Intel Processors
So the old CPU guide is FAR outdated. So I figured, why not make a new one? Well this guide will be far bigger and better than the old one, and will probably be pages long. My goal here is to go way in depth of what the CPU does, and is, and even take a closer look at the processors that people are interested in buying nowadays.

I will be utilizing a number-decimal system, and to use this just look at the table of contents (below), press CTRL+F, and enter the number and decimal by the section. You should jump straight to the section you want.

Table Of Contents
1.1 - The Big Two CPU Companies
2.1 - What is the CPU?
3.1 - A Deeper Look
  • 3.2: Frequency
  • 3.3: Caches
  • 3.4: Architecture
4.1 - A List of some Better Known Intel CPUs
  • 4.2: Celeron Dual Core
  • 4.3: Pentium Dual Cores
  • 4.4: Core 2 Duos
  • 4.5: Core 2 Duo 4 Series
  • 4.6: Core 2 Duo 6 Series
  • 4.7: Core 2 Duo 7 and 5 Series
  • 4.8: Core 2 Duo 8 Series
  • 4.9: Core 2 Quad 6 Series
  • 4.10: Core 2 Quad 9 Series
  • 4.11: Core 2 Extreme
5.1 - Final Words
6.1 - Log


1.1 THE BIG TWO CPU COMPANIES:
There are two main processor companies, and although one is very dominant in most computers (which is the one this guide will focus on), the other is a very good choice for a lower end computer, or if you don’t want to overclock.
Intel. The focus of this guide. Intel is putting out the most powerful CPUs on the market at this point, ranging from the little Celeron E1200 up through the Quad Extreme QX9650. Intel is sure to have something to fit your needs. Intel’s main offerings now are the Core 2 Duo (E6xxx, E4x00, E8x00, E7x00) and Core 2 Quad (Q6x00, Q9xxx, QXxxxx) lines, which perform extremely well, however they also have great offerings for the cheap-o overclockers out there, like the Pentium Dual Core line, containing the E21x0. Almost every Intel chip will overclock extremely high very easily.
AMD. AMD seems to be having some problems right now. They have paired up with ATI and lately they are having some problems putting out the chips Intel has been throwing out. Their main strength is in their lower end chips, and people who don’t intend on overclocking. They have a totally different naming scheme than Intel, as their way of marking dual core and quad core CPUs is by putting a number in the name proceeding an “X” to specify the number of cores. For example, if you see an AMD processor having an “X2” on the end, that marks it has two cores. If it says “X4” or “Phenom”, it is a quad core. If it has neither of the above, it is a single core processor, something you should stay away from at this day in age. AMD does not have their 45nm processing technology out yet, something Intel put out in January. In fact, AMD doesn’t even have it scheduled until Q4 2008 or early 2009. Nevertheless, AMD is NOT a bad company; they’ve just been late to the party for awhile.


2.1 - What is the processor or CPU?

Essentially, the CPU is the “brain” of the computer. All processes are handled by it. It is the smallest part of the computer, but it’s also the most important. Its job is to figure out how to do every single task it’s assigned to. You may be wondering what exactly does it do more specifically. The answer: math. Basically, the CPU is designed to be able to do MATH at light speed. Figure out equations in one millionth of a second. I will not go into exactly how it can do this, for the sake of an extra 40 pages, but it can do it. The definition of the Central Processing Unit: the key component of a computer system, which contains the circuitry necessary to interpret and execute program instructions. (Dictionary.com)

3.1A Deeper Look

3.2The Frequency
The frequency of a processor is the speed of which it can do its job. The earlier processors had as little as a couple megahertz (or MHz), however as time went on, things went from 2MHz, to 166MHz, and up and up, and before you knew it we were where we are now, at 3GHz on a typical processor. 3GHz is a total of over three thousand megahertz. However it’s not nearly as easy as that. You see, when we progressed in technology, we moved up and got as high as 3.5GHz in single core processors, such as Pentium 4s. But then we began moving on to bigger better things. Intel came out with the first Dual Core CPU. Intel first brought the Dual Core processor to the market and, since it had two cores running simultaneously, it had a lower frequency. However, when you have two cores in a CPU running at 2.5GHz instead of one core running at 3.0GHz, you get much higher performance. This was able to run multiple applications *much* faster. But wait. Before you start thinking that 2 cores at 2.5GHz each make a 5GHz processor, I am telling you that is NOT CORRECT. Now we’re in a totally different ball game. The second core only kicks in when needed. For example, when I try to open a program like Photoshop or Firefox, my processor may get busier than it was idling. But, a closer look reveals that my second core isn’t doing much of anything. It is not needed. When browsing the internet, my CPU usage for core 1 may stick around 3%. But my second core is at 0% to 1%. Granted, when I’m running Crysis, both my cores are going to be going crazy. But in normal times, the CPU will only use both cores when it needs them, like in more complicated, multithreaded applications. Anyway, I’m getting off topic, so moving on!!

3.3Caches
The cache of a processor is basically a little bit of memory built in to the CPU. When the CPU is given a particularly challenging equation, the cache is there to help it out. There can be three different caches. The first one is called the level 1 cache, hence the abbreviation L1 cache. This is the smallest, but fastest, of the three. The second is the L2 cache. This is the larger cache, and the one mainly used in today’s computers, however it is not as fast as the L1. The third is the L3, as you probably guessed, but it’s not used much in most processors. In fact, very few CPUs even have them. However they do exist. When the equation is too big for the L1 cache to take care of, it will pass it to the L2. The L2 must complete it, as most processors do not have L3s.

3.4Architecture
The architecture is basically how efficiently the processor handles information. It’s the inside layout of the CPU itself. The architecture plays a very large role in the performance of a CPU, because the better the architecture is, the easier it is for the CPU to function at the speed of which it’s designed to, and, at higher frequencies via overclocking. Think of it this way: If you’re driving, and there’s one way to get where you want to get. You probably would want that to be a short route. However, what if it isn’t? What if it’s a long way? The processor will have to function slower than usual to handle the information. This could result in many things, like extra heat, or poor heat dissipation, or just being unstable. The architecture is what is setting Intel away from AMD at this time. Intel’s Core 2 Duo architecture is unbelievably great. Very efficient, fast, and they run extremely cool also. Yes, architecture plays a much bigger role than you think.

Ok, so that’s most of the general basics of a processor’s performance. Now I will take the liberty to go through some processors with you, and help you decide which ones are better or worse.
4.1A Look At Some Better Known CPUs, from Low end, to higher end.
Celeron Dual Core

4.2 - The Celeron Dual Core E1200
Frequency: 1.6GHz
Cache: 512KB L2
FSB: 800MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $50 at Newegg
The E1200 is probably the cheapest dual core available. It’s got an 800MHz front side bus, so most somewhat recently built computers can probably upgrade to it. It is an overclocking maniac, and perfect for someone on a cheap-o budget. If you can afford a little more, check the Pentium Dual Cores next.

4.3Pentium Dual Cores

The Pentium Dual Core E2160
Frequency: 1.8GHz
Cache: 1MB
FSB: 800MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $68 at Newegg
The E2160 is a step up from the Celeron, but still isn’t much. It’s very popular among the overclocking community for being an excellent OC’er. Although its stock speed is only 1.8GHz, this thing has been known to push 3.8GHz if you have some crazy cooling and a decent motherboard.

Pentium Dual Core E2180
Frequency: 2.0GHz
Cache: 1MB
FSB: 800MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $70 at Newegg
The 2180 is a higher performing PDC. Another overclocker, it was intended to be the highest end Pentium DC, but Intel later put out the E2200. This thing is great for those that want an extra stock frequency processor, that are skiddish of overclocking at the moment, but might do it in the future. Don’t expect any uber speed from it, but it should manhandle anything you throw at it pretty well, especially when overclocked.

Pentium Dual Core E2200
Frequency: 2.2GHz
Cache: 1MB
FSB: 800MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $80 at Newegg
This is the highest performing Pentium Dual Core, and also the newest addition to the family. It’s made for people on a tighter budget, and want a processor that is fast stock, but can overclock regardless. Many people use this as a temporary CPU while they save up money to grab a nicer quad core or something faster. An excellent performer in most categories, this is a great CPU for the price.

4.4Core 2 Duo

4.5Core 2 Duos: 4 series

Core 2 Duo E4300
Frequency: 1.8GHz
Cache: 2MB
FSB: 800MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $120 at most places (Newegg’s 4300 is currently deactivated >_>
The C2D E4300 is the lowest end of the Core 2 Duos. It is also one of the higher overclockers. This little beast can push 4GHz. Want the Core 2 Duo name? Want a crazy overclocker? Want a low price? Meet the E4300.

Core 2 Duo E4400
Frequency: 2.0GHz
Cache: 2MB
FSB: 800MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $130 at ZipZoomFly
The E4400 is intended more for people that want to build middle-of-the-road computers, that don’t need anything too fancy, yet this thing can handle pretty much any task with ease. As with any C2D, it’s a performer in the OCing department too.

Core 2 Duo E4500
Frequency: 2.2GHz
Cache: 2MB
FSB: 800MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $125 at Newegg
The E4500 is one of the higher end budget CPUs. It is more engineered to be run at stock speeds, instead of being overclocked. This is not a problem, because most hardcore OCers will go for the lower end one or the top end CPU. This is for the person who is newer to overclocking, so they’re interested in a higher stock speed, but they want it to have OC potential. Well, this one does.

Core 2 Duo E4600
Frequency: 2.4GHz
Cache: 2MB
FSB: 800MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $120 at Newegg
The E4600 is the highest performing 4-series chip. Doing excellent in all categories, this thing is fast off the line, and continues to be fast until it dies. It will also overclock like a raped ape.
4.6
Core 2 Duos – 6 Series


I will not be going fully into depth listing all the 6 series chips, as there is so many. I will list the more prominent ones, and if you want information on another one, post or PM me and I will be glad to add it.

Core 2 Duo E6300
Frequency: 1.86GHz
Cache: 2MB
FSB: 1066MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $155 at Newegg
The E6300 is an older C2D, but still a performer. I believe it uses the older L2 stepping, and while it’s not a new chip, it’s still a good choice if you’re on a budget, and the price is right. Most can do 3GHz fairly easily.

Core 2 Duo E6420
Frequency: 2.13GHz
Cache: 4MB
FSB: 1066MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $180 at Newegg
The E6420 is a more known CPU than the E6300, and it’s a better one too. It uses the newer, but yet older B2 stepping, and is a good choice for a lower end system. These are easy to find used, especially on OCN or eBay or other used item sites. If you find a bargain, snag one, and overclock that sucker.

Core 2 Duo E6550
Frequency: 2.33GHz
Cache: 4MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $165 at Newegg
A G0 stepper, this is a pretty new processor. It’s a lower end Core 2 Duo compared to some higher performers, but don’t worry, it’s got plenty of guts there. These can break 4GHz if the rest of your system is willing, granted you get a good chip.

Core 2 Duo E6600
Frequency: 2.4GHz
Cache: 4MB
FSB: 1066MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $240 at ZipZoomFly
Wow, these CPUs are VERY popular. I can remember when nearly everyone had one. Now, everyone who had one is trying to sell them. Not that they’re bad, they’re just getting old, and people want better performing chips. I highly suggest you do NOT buy them from a retailer unless they’re super cheap, as there is better chips for better prices. E6600s are B2 stepping, and most can do 3.6GHz. Once again, if the price is right, snag one.

Core 2 Duo E6750
Frequency: 2.66GHz
Cache: 4MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $180 at Newegg
E6750s are great chips and I actually was very close to buying one, before the E8400s came out. They were the CPU to get for awhile. Still very common, and these G0s can break 4GHz when done right. If you get a good deal, grab an E6750!

Core 2 Duo E6850
Frequency: 3GHz
Cache: 4MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $190 at Newegg
E6850 popularity is actually gaining now, since prices are dropping on G0s, because people are moving to Wolfdales and Penryns. They are stock at 3GHz, and can do 4GHz on air fairly easily. Look into one if you want something a little faster than the E6750. Even though they’re outdated, they are still a powerhouse, and if you catch a good deal, snatch one.

4.7Core 2 Duos – 5 and 7 Series

Core 2 Duo E5200
Frequency: 2.5GHz
Cache: 3MB
Manufacuring technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $80 at Newegg
The successor to the highly acclaimed Pentium Dual Core series (E2140, E2160, E2180, E2200), this is a similar CPU, but with the die shrunk to 45nm. Most chips can do 4Ghz, and for a budget chip, this thing kills.

Core 2 Duo E7200
Frequency: 2.53GHz
Cache: 3MB
FSB: 1066MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $130 at Newegg
The E7200 is a fairly new addition, along with the entire 8 series. It utilizes Intel’s new 45nm manufacturing technology, which allows it to overclock far better, with less heat. It’s ment to be a little sibling to the hugely successful E8400, and it will easily do 4GHz. You usually won’t find these for sale used, as they are new, but if you’re in the market for a high performing chip on a budget, bingo. If you can’t afford an E8400, snag one. This is probably one of the best Intel chips for the money. You won’t regret it.

4.8Core 2 Duos – 8 Series

Core 2 Duo E8200
Frequency: 2.66GHz
Cache: 6MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $175 at Newegg
The E8200 is the lowest end 8 series chip, and although it’s not a bad chip, its not the best for your money either. If you want one, go ahead, it’s not a bad choice, but there are better choices. You can go down safely to the E7200 which performs very similar for $50 less, and not look back, or you can go up. It is a great overclocker though, and most will break 4GHz fairly easily.

Core 2 Duo E8300 is discontinued most places, so I’ll just skip it.

Core 2 Duo E8400
Frequency: 3.0GHz
Cache: 6MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $170 at Newegg
This is a legendary processor. The mighty E8400 is currently the best bang-for-your-buck Dual core out there. It has a great stock speed, and great overclocking potential as well. There has been several that have broken 5GHz. Yes, five. I have mine running at 3.7 right now and temps top out at 40. Idle at 25C. If you can afford one, the only question is whether you wanna go with this, or quad. Or the E8500.

Core 2 Duo E8500
Frequency: 3.16GHz
Cache: 6MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $189 at Newegg
This is the higher end CPU for dual cores. I believe it runs the C0 stepping yet, while the new E8400s and E8600s have gone to the E0, a better overclocker. Take a look at those, but this still remains a killer chip!

Core 2 Duo E8600
Frequency: 3.33GHz
Cache: 6MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $269
The highest performing dual core in the Core 2 Duo series, this will beat almost any other dual core out there. It's the latest addition, and runs the new E0 stepping, which has been known to do 5GHz on air. It is an excellent choice, so if you want a great chip, this gives the E8400 a run for its money!


Core 2 Quad


4.9Core 2 Quads – 6 Series

Core 2 Quad Q6600
Frequency: 2.4GHz
Cache: 2x4MB
FSB: 1066MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $200 at Newegg
The most popular quad core on the market. This comes in two different revisions: The B3 stepping one, and G0. The B3 DOES NOT OVERCLOCK AS HIGH as the G0. Watch which one you’re getting before you purchase, and don’t post overclocking questions without telling us first which it is. Anyways, this is a very good CPU, probably one of the fastest sellers there, and even though there are newer quads, this is still a very very good chip. IF you get a very good chip, a Q6600 can do 4GHz. I highly suggest it.

Core 2 Quad Q6700
Frequency: 2.66GHz
Cache: 2x4MB
FSB: 1066MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $280 at Newegg
A good quad core, this is for the enthusiast that the Q6600 isn’t enough for. You’d probably be interested in this is you caught a good deal, and they can do 4GHz if you get a good chip. They’re easy to find when people are upgrading from these to the newer 9 series. It’s not a bad idea.

4.10Core 2 Quads – 9 Series

Core 2 Quad Q9300
Frequency: 2.5GHz
Cache: 6MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $275 at Newegg
The Q9300 is the part of the newest addition to the quad family, and out of those, it’s the lowest performing. That does not, however, mean that it’s a bad CPU. It’s for the enthusiast who wants a high performing quad and is going to overclock the crap out of it, and this can handle it.

Core 2 Quad Q9450
Frequency: 2.66GHz
Cache: 12MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $325 at Newegg
The Q9450 is probably the most popular new quad on the market, and the best bang-for-your buck too. A great stock speed, great overclocking, an enormous cache, and 45nm mfg tech, this is killer.

Core 2 Quad Q9550
Frequency: 2.83GHz
Cache: 12MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $550 at Newegg
This is the best Core 2 Quad available, although not the best quad. I suggest people interested in this also take a peek at the Core 2 Extremes, as you obviously have a high income. I can tell you one thing for sure though, this beast will shred anything you throw at it.

4.11Core 2 Extreme (here I will add the number of cores, as some are duals and some are quads)

Core 2 Extreme QX6850
Number of cores: 4
Frequency: 3GHz
Cache: 2x4MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $1025 at Newegg (no, that is not a typo)
This was the king of all processors for awhile, as you can see probably by the price . At this point, the QX9650 walks all over this, so unless you can find a better deal on this, then go to the QX9650.

Core 2 Extreme X6800
Number of cores: 2
Frequency: 2.93GHz
Cache: 4MB
FSB: 1066MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 65nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $1000 at Newegg
This is not a good idea. It’s probably the biggest rip-off CPU Intel is still producing. I’m not trying to bash it, but think about it. Compare this to the E8400 or Q9450. They have better everything. These can do 4GHz, but the others can do it better. Get a QX9650 or something cheaper.

Core 2 Extreme QX9650
Number of cores: 4
Frequency: 3GHz
Cache: 12MB
FSB: 1333MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775
Price: $1017 at Newegg
This is the second highest performing desktop processor on the market, and unless you have too much money to spend, (in which case you can give me a couple thousand) you don’t need one of these. But if you really want one, and have the money, go ahead. This is a fantastic processor, and terrific overclocker (6GHz has been done) and not to mention when you show the crowd one of these you’re sure to get the :O response. I wish I had one

Core 2 Extreme QX9770
Number of cores: 4
Frequency: 3.2GHz
Cache: 12MB
FSB: 1600MHz
Manufacturing Technology: 45nm
Socket: LGA775 OR LGA771 (Skulltrail)
Price: $1500
The highest performing single desktop processor. The ultimate. The dominator. Yeah, this pretty much destroys every other CPU on the market. I believe I saw an article once where one of these did 9GHz on Liquid Nitrogen, but amazingly enough, it was fast enough stock (who’da thunk it?). If you get one, just be careful, you don’t wanna blow a $1500 CPU. But honestly, why would you need this? Anyways, this is the best of the best, and I congratulate anyone that is lucky enough to own one.


5.1
Well this concludes my guide, and I hope you learned something from it. It has wound up being a total of 15 Word pages, which is a pretty massive guide by my standards. So feel free to post your questions, or PM me, and I just hope I helped someone after the hours and hours I have put into this. Happy surfing!


This has been a massive guide brought to you by wierdo124!

Also feel free to check out my Intel Cooling Guide - Link in my signature.

6.1: Log
July 1st 2008: Original guide posted
July 5th 2008: Table of Contents, navigation system, and log installed
September 27th 2008: A couple updates.
Edited by wierdo124 - 9/27/08 at 5:36pm
Bravo One
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post #2 of 37
Some changes, forgot the E8300 and E4700, slightly reduce the huge font size for the titles. Other than that its a good guide.
     
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Crucial MX100 512GB Samsung 850 EVO 1TB Toshiba 2TB 7.2K RPM Silicon Power S60 120GB 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Noctua NH-D15S Windows 10 Pro x64 Acer G257HU Logitech G910 
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post #3 of 37
Good guide but I would have to say that the E7200 is the best dual core for the money, not the E4xxx chips. You could probably cut down on the large font and use Bold, Italic, and underline to differentiate between sections and titles
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Mr. Windy
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post #4 of 37
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the suggestions, guys. I just implemented the bolds and underlines, and i'll add the E4700 tomorrow...i don't know why i missed that one.
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Intel Core i7 6700k Gigabyte Z170X-UD3 EVGA GTX1070 SC ACX3.0 16GB EVGA DDR4-2400mhz (2x8GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo 120GB WD 1TB WD 500GB WD 250GB 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Cooler Master Hyper TX3 Windows 10 x64 24" Asus 24" Samsung  
KeyboardPowerCase
OCN/Ducky Mechanical Corsair HX520 Fractal Design Define R5 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4200M HP Probook 650 G1 Intel IGP 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
500GB DVD/RW Windows 7 Pro 64 bit 15" 
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Bravo One
(15 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 6700k Gigabyte Z170X-UD3 EVGA GTX1070 SC ACX3.0 16GB EVGA DDR4-2400mhz (2x8GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo 120GB WD 1TB WD 500GB WD 250GB 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Cooler Master Hyper TX3 Windows 10 x64 24" Asus 24" Samsung  
KeyboardPowerCase
OCN/Ducky Mechanical Corsair HX520 Fractal Design Define R5 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4200M HP Probook 650 G1 Intel IGP 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
500GB DVD/RW Windows 7 Pro 64 bit 15" 
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post #5 of 37
Thread Starter 
I expected i would never have to bump this.
Bravo One
(15 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 6700k Gigabyte Z170X-UD3 EVGA GTX1070 SC ACX3.0 16GB EVGA DDR4-2400mhz (2x8GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo 120GB WD 1TB WD 500GB WD 250GB 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Cooler Master Hyper TX3 Windows 10 x64 24" Asus 24" Samsung  
KeyboardPowerCase
OCN/Ducky Mechanical Corsair HX520 Fractal Design Define R5 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4200M HP Probook 650 G1 Intel IGP 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
500GB DVD/RW Windows 7 Pro 64 bit 15" 
  hide details  
Reply
Bravo One
(15 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 6700k Gigabyte Z170X-UD3 EVGA GTX1070 SC ACX3.0 16GB EVGA DDR4-2400mhz (2x8GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo 120GB WD 1TB WD 500GB WD 250GB 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Cooler Master Hyper TX3 Windows 10 x64 24" Asus 24" Samsung  
KeyboardPowerCase
OCN/Ducky Mechanical Corsair HX520 Fractal Design Define R5 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4200M HP Probook 650 G1 Intel IGP 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
500GB DVD/RW Windows 7 Pro 64 bit 15" 
  hide details  
Reply
post #6 of 37
Thread Starter 
ToC and navigation system added.
Bravo One
(15 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 6700k Gigabyte Z170X-UD3 EVGA GTX1070 SC ACX3.0 16GB EVGA DDR4-2400mhz (2x8GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo 120GB WD 1TB WD 500GB WD 250GB 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Cooler Master Hyper TX3 Windows 10 x64 24" Asus 24" Samsung  
KeyboardPowerCase
OCN/Ducky Mechanical Corsair HX520 Fractal Design Define R5 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4200M HP Probook 650 G1 Intel IGP 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
500GB DVD/RW Windows 7 Pro 64 bit 15" 
  hide details  
Reply
Bravo One
(15 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 6700k Gigabyte Z170X-UD3 EVGA GTX1070 SC ACX3.0 16GB EVGA DDR4-2400mhz (2x8GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo 120GB WD 1TB WD 500GB WD 250GB 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Cooler Master Hyper TX3 Windows 10 x64 24" Asus 24" Samsung  
KeyboardPowerCase
OCN/Ducky Mechanical Corsair HX520 Fractal Design Define R5 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4200M HP Probook 650 G1 Intel IGP 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
500GB DVD/RW Windows 7 Pro 64 bit 15" 
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Reply
post #7 of 37
nice!
post #8 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PR1M3R View Post
nice!
Thanks!
Bravo One
(15 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 6700k Gigabyte Z170X-UD3 EVGA GTX1070 SC ACX3.0 16GB EVGA DDR4-2400mhz (2x8GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo 120GB WD 1TB WD 500GB WD 250GB 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Cooler Master Hyper TX3 Windows 10 x64 24" Asus 24" Samsung  
KeyboardPowerCase
OCN/Ducky Mechanical Corsair HX520 Fractal Design Define R5 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4200M HP Probook 650 G1 Intel IGP 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
500GB DVD/RW Windows 7 Pro 64 bit 15" 
  hide details  
Reply
Bravo One
(15 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 6700k Gigabyte Z170X-UD3 EVGA GTX1070 SC ACX3.0 16GB EVGA DDR4-2400mhz (2x8GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo 120GB WD 1TB WD 500GB WD 250GB 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Cooler Master Hyper TX3 Windows 10 x64 24" Asus 24" Samsung  
KeyboardPowerCase
OCN/Ducky Mechanical Corsair HX520 Fractal Design Define R5 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4200M HP Probook 650 G1 Intel IGP 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
500GB DVD/RW Windows 7 Pro 64 bit 15" 
  hide details  
Reply
post #9 of 37
Thread Starter 
Bumpo
Bravo One
(15 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 6700k Gigabyte Z170X-UD3 EVGA GTX1070 SC ACX3.0 16GB EVGA DDR4-2400mhz (2x8GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo 120GB WD 1TB WD 500GB WD 250GB 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Cooler Master Hyper TX3 Windows 10 x64 24" Asus 24" Samsung  
KeyboardPowerCase
OCN/Ducky Mechanical Corsair HX520 Fractal Design Define R5 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4200M HP Probook 650 G1 Intel IGP 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
500GB DVD/RW Windows 7 Pro 64 bit 15" 
  hide details  
Reply
Bravo One
(15 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 6700k Gigabyte Z170X-UD3 EVGA GTX1070 SC ACX3.0 16GB EVGA DDR4-2400mhz (2x8GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo 120GB WD 1TB WD 500GB WD 250GB 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
Cooler Master Hyper TX3 Windows 10 x64 24" Asus 24" Samsung  
KeyboardPowerCase
OCN/Ducky Mechanical Corsair HX520 Fractal Design Define R5 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4200M HP Probook 650 G1 Intel IGP 8GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
500GB DVD/RW Windows 7 Pro 64 bit 15" 
  hide details  
Reply
post #10 of 37
great guide....i have an year old E4400 which does 2.9GHz on stock volts and now i have it running @3.0Ghz due to high ambient temps else it does 3.4GHz @ 1.4v....haven't seen what its max level is....have to change that soon.... reps for u....now wondering to stick with for some more time or to shift to a E7200
My Rig
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500k Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Sapphire HD7850 Gskill Ripjaws X 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Western Digital Western Digital Western Digital Samsung DVD RW 
CoolingOSMonitorPower
Thermalright Ultra120 Extreme Windows 7 Dell ST2410 Corsair HX650W 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
CoolerMaster CM690 Logitech G600 Razer Goliathus Sennheiser EH150 
Audio
Edifier C2 
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My Rig
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500k Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Sapphire HD7850 Gskill Ripjaws X 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Western Digital Western Digital Western Digital Samsung DVD RW 
CoolingOSMonitorPower
Thermalright Ultra120 Extreme Windows 7 Dell ST2410 Corsair HX650W 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
CoolerMaster CM690 Logitech G600 Razer Goliathus Sennheiser EH150 
Audio
Edifier C2 
  hide details  
Reply
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