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Benefits of higher FSB? Aim for 1:1?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Is there any benefits or disadvantages to running an e8400 with a higher FSB/lower multiplier compared to running a lower FSB/higher multiplier?

I am using 1066 DDR2 (p35 mobo) so ram really doesn't limit me here. The main reason im asking if having a high FSB is better is so I can get to a 1:1 ratio with my ram - is it even worth it or should I use dividers?


thanks in advance
post #2 of 6
First of all, welcome to OCN. Please fill out your system specs in UserCP->Add System

Go for the higher FSB if you can keep the overclock stable. This will allow you to keep a 1:1 ratio without underclocking your ram. Having a 1:1 ratio makes your computer "snappier" if you will. Most people will tell you it's faster. I always keep a 1:1 ratio.
post #3 of 6
wehat is the difference between link and sync and the 1:1 or are they the same
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post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
thanks for the welcome and prompt reply

this is a noob question, but people always refer to using a divider as under clocking your ram. I was using the following formula to see some different dividers:

DRAM Final Clockrate = (2 x FSB)/Divider

say I had a 450 FSB and was using a 4/5 divider with 1066 ram: 900/(5/6) = 1125.

so wouldn't I be overclocking the ram?
post #5 of 6
This question is i good reason to run benchmarks. Try your E8400 at 445X9 and run superPi or another benchmark then run it again at 500X8 and see if there's a difference. Make sure to defragment and restart between each test to get accurate results and run it more than once each also. More data is always better.
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post #6 of 6
900/(5/6) = (900*6)/5 =/= 1125 ...

But using a 4:5 ratio with a 450 FSB would effectively give you 1125 MHz RAM.

I can't really speak as an expert on how to best utilize your RAM, but I did read RAM clocked higher than your CPU's FSB gave minimal performance gains compared to RAM clocked equal to your CPU. For example, DDR2-1066 and DDR2-800 perform relatively equally with a 400 FSB.

As for why different ratios are available, I'm not too sure. My best guess would be to better utilize faster memory without having to substantially raise the FSB.
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