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vdrop and vdroop

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
What is vdrop and vdroop how do i know if i have it?
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post #2 of 10
Compare the voltage for the cpu that you have set in your bios, to the voltage that Cpu-Z reads out. That is your answer
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post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
How do i fix it if cpu-z reads it wrong?
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post #4 of 10
Vdroop is when your CPU voltage goes lower than the set value due to stress and passing through MOSFETS. Another example if that is: say you are listening to music in your car. You have a really nice system with aftermarket head unit, subwoofer, and two amps to cover all 5 (or however many you have) speakers. With the volume turned up (inducing stress), your lights blink to the music because you haven't enough amperage to supply to everything. See that due to stress on the electrical system, your 13.8v-14.4v current is being momentarily dipped down to say 11.6v.

Virtually all PCs are succeptible to vdroop. A good way to really check it out is note your BIOS voltage settings. Boot the computer up and open up CPU-Z and look at the voltage value. Because no system is perfect, I can guarantee that you will have at least some vdroop present.

There are ways to combat the symptoms, such as overvolting, or another just as popular remedy, the pencil mod. Basically you are lowering resistance in a given adjacent MOSFET, or the like, to compensate for the loss in voltage at load.
    
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post #5 of 10
Oh, there's confusion here......................

Vdrop:
Your PSU can not supply the power the system is calling for and the voltage drops.
Check this by connecting a digital volt meter to a spare 12v molev. Stress the computer and see how low the voltage falls. more than 5% is a potential problem.

Vdroop (the Cliff's version!):
When the CPU's load changes, the motherboard sends more voltage to the CPU. Since the motherboard's voltage regulator can't accurately change voltages at the extreme rates called for by the motherboard, some overshoot of the target voltage occurs. Vdroop just sets a lower target voltage so that the CPU isn't overvolted by the voltage overshoots by the motherboatd voltage regulator.

So are either Vdrop or Vdroop bad?
Vdrop: So long as it is less than 5%, is pretty much OK for everything except extreme benchmarking (wherein even a 0.05v change may kill an overclock!)

Vdroop: Great for everyday use up to pretty hard overclocks. It protects the CPU.
Fro extreme overclocks (i.e. LN2) many people like to controll voltages absolutely. Many of these rigs have altered/modified voltage regulators anyway.

Hope this helps..............
LL
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My System
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FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
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Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
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2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
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post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
i hope i dont need another psu
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E8600 gigabyte P35-DS3L need a video card atm gskill 2gbs ddr 800 
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antec 900 mx 518 
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Custom Computer
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E8600 gigabyte P35-DS3L need a video card atm gskill 2gbs ddr 800 
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post #7 of 10
open cpuz and watch the voltage when your computer is on load or idle
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by razr7 View Post
open cpuz and watch the voltage when your computer is on load or idle
Better to hook a digital volt meter to a spare 12v molex and watch the 12v rail change with load. That will tell you if you need a better (but, not necessarily bigger!) PSU.
My System
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
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My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
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post #9 of 10
I have a doubt. When calculating vdrop should i take as reference the bios voltage or vrm voltage? For example i have OC with 1.356v on bios and during load i reach a max of 1.344v. Sometimes it drops to 1.332v. Should i consider bios voltage or VRm (1.332v) voltage as 100%?
Edited by gettingstarted - 2/11/16 at 10:33am
post #10 of 10
vdrop does it have any impact on gaming?
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