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Spread Spectrum

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I saw a option in my Bios that is called spread spectrum. I can enable or disable this option. Can anyone tell me what this is used for and what I should do?
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardOSMonitor
Intel 3.0ghz @ 3.5 Ghz DFI Lanparty Pro 875B XP Pro 17" Viewsonic 
PowerCase
520W OCZ Thermaltake Tsunami 
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My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardOSMonitor
Intel 3.0ghz @ 3.5 Ghz DFI Lanparty Pro 875B XP Pro 17" Viewsonic 
PowerCase
520W OCZ Thermaltake Tsunami 
  hide details  
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post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bio}{azard
I saw a option in my Bios that is called spread spectrum. I can enable or disable this option. Can anyone tell me what this is used for and what I should do?
Spread Spectrum

Options : Enabled, Disabled, 0.25%, 0.5%, Smart Clock

When the motherboard's clock generator pulses, the extreme values (spikes) of the pulses creates EMI (Electromagnetic Interference). The Spead Spectrum function reduces the EMI generated by modulating the pulses so that the spikes of the pulses are reduced to flatter curves. It does so by varying the frequency so that it doesn't use any particular frequency for more than a moment. This reduces interference problems with other electronics in the area.

However, while enabling Spread Spectrum decreases EMI, system stability and performance may be slightly compromised. This may be especially true with timing-critical devices like clock-sensitive SCSI devices.

Some BIOSes offer a Smart Clock option. Instead of modulating the frequency of the pulses over time, Smart Clock turns off the AGP, PCI and SDRAM clock signals when not in use. Thus, EMI can be reduced without compromising system stability. As a bonus, using Smart Clock can also help reduce power consumption.

If you do not have any EMI problem, leave the setting at Disabled for optimal system stability and performance. But if you are plagued by EMI, use the Smart Clock setting if possible and settle for Enabled or one of the two other values if Smart Clock is not available. The percentage values denote the amount of jitter (variation) that the BIOS performs on the clock frequency. So, a lower value (0.25%) is comparatively better for system stability while a higher value (0.5%) is better for EMI reduction. Remember to disable Spread Spectrum if you are overclocking because even a 0.25% jitter can introduce a temporary boost in clockspeed of 25MHz (with a 1GHz CPU) which may just cause your overclocked processor to lock up. Or at least use the Smart Clock setting as that doesn't involve any modulation of the frequency.
post #3 of 8
disable disable
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plague
disable disable
Lol OOps sorry i forgot to specify thanks for clearing that one up for me Plaque
post #5 of 8
lol after all that you forgot to mention it
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plague
lol after all that you forgot to mention it
Yeah what can i say im getting old lol
post #7 of 8
for me i dit reach a overclock from 2.700 1045t > 3.500 mhz (spread spectrum dusabled whit only a miner voltage increas) (vcore stock 1.25 now .2625) (nb stock 1.1 now 1.1125)
if i enable spread spectrum i can puch it to 3.800mhz eazy but it need much move volts for even reaching 3.500 and the cpu gits more head but
i disable spread spectrum the nb is getting much more head and i cant puch cpu more then 3.500 even on this low voltage
still for me the lower voltage i can reach disabling spread spectrum (i place a fan on nb) makes my cpu runs cooler and i like that
however whit a desened cooler i wod not disable spread spectrum in my case and up the volts much more on nb and cpu and go for
3.800 overclock (nb v 1.2 cpu voltage 1.35~1.4)

cool'n quiet disabled! cool'n quied if on disabled maks your cpu run on the max clock speed all the time and not puch it doun on ideal
if you are overclocking keep the NB, HT, RAM, near stock speed even beter lower the ram a bit
up the cpu freaquency 5 each time til it wont boot then up the nb and cpu voltage a bit and then add helf of what you reach on stock voltage try to get it stable from that point if it runs cool and unstable
add more voltage to nb and cpu i reacomand not adding more then 0.15v from stock to nb and cpu max you can go for more if you have allot of cooling still i like to play safe

alwase disable cool'n quiet !
and i recomand disable turbo
if your cpu runs hot disable spread spectrum and lover voltage note the nb get more head if you do so and you need less voltage increase for stable overclock
but a good moderboad wond have anny issue and maby even reach a beter overclock disabling spread spectrum

if anyone tinks im wrong please command

oo and hire are all the parts of my pc:
Motherboard: Asro 970 EXTREME3 970 FRG SA
CPU: AMD Phe II X6 1045T 2700 AM3 BOX
Psu: Antec High Current Gamer 520W ATX23
SSD: SSD 250GB 520/540 840 EVOBasic SA3 SAM
HDD: WD 500GB WD5000AAKX Blue SA3
Ram: D3 8GB 1333-999 Blu K2 KHX
GPU: Sapp4GB D5 X R9 290 OC TRI-X FRGAM AMD
cooler cpu: CooMas Hyper212 Evo << whit 2x Scy Slip Stream 800 120x120x25

and a bunch of extra Scy Slip Stream 800 120x120x25 in the case

DVD: LG GH24NS 24x SA bk B
case: Rasurbo Vort-X U2 bk ATX
Edited by Maikel1309NL - 12/28/14 at 2:23am
post #8 of 8
Slightly off on a tangent but does anyone know a source for the C64 / Spectrum Bios?
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