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post #21 of 30
This is why you use a seedbox, amazing speeds and the traffic to your computer is 100% SFTP .
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post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by paradoxnighthawk View Post
I can't imagine what a bill would look like. At $15-20 a movie and $1 a track one could rack up a few grand in a month on today's connection speeds.
This is the best solution I've seen so far. It is much better than being sued for more than your worth or put in jail.

Being an audiophile, this won't bother me much. Most of the stuff on the internet is a digital tragedy. Ripped, burned, reripped, further compressed, resampled, hiccups intentionaly added?... is there any of the original source left? I'd rather rip things from my own (brand new) discs so that I know the source is good and the process is good.
amen man, I'm not an audiophile but god damn those hiccups make me wonder if its my computer or the song. Just a joke what the sound quality is on anything not ripped off a CD.
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post #23 of 30
I find this humorous. People scream "PIRATES ARE BAD!!" And then praise the RIAA for this BS they are trying to put in place that won't solve anything. Without a means for reprisal because, lets face it, you can hack wireless and then BOOM, it's not YOUR connection getting dumped. And don't tell me people have not thought about this. It's still very easy to get around, and no way enforcable by law. They are grasping at the final ways they can make money because their marking system has failed. It's not going to be better for them, it's going to make piracy more encrypted, and harder to find.

face it, they failed. Plain & simple.
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post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raziel View Post
People scream "PIRATES ARE BAD!!" And then praise the RIAA for this BS they are trying to put in place that won't solve anything.
How do you know it won't solve anything? It certainly won't utterly fix piracy, but will certainly limit piracy to those who have the knowledge and the means to use encryption for their downloads. That will certainly help diminish piracy by making it more difficult than simply downloading uTorrent, searching Pirate Bay, and clicking on a .torrent link.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raziel View Post
Without a means for reprisal because, lets face it, you can hack wireless and then BOOM, it's not YOUR connection getting dumped.
True, but that is an easy fix. Your ISP will be able to know which machine downloaded it by reading the MAC address and then banning that MAC address from internet access or just monitoring the connection for obvious red flags.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raziel View Post
And don't tell me people have not thought about this. It's still very easy to get around, and no way enforcable by law.
It isn't necessarily easy to get around, and it isn't a matter of enforcing it by law. ISPs such as Comcast are already experimenting with download limits, and the RIAA is just giving them another reason to cap downloads. They're pandering to the ISP companies' desires to regulate their enterprise and allow for more customers to have faster internet connections without the ability to hog network bandwidth by downloading lots and lots of things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raziel View Post
They are grasping at the final ways they can make money because their marking system has failed.
Very true. See above.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raziel View Post
It's not going to be better for them, it's going to make piracy more encrypted, and harder to find.
It might actually put them in a better situation, since forcing piracy to go underground will diminish their supposed losses due to piracy since it will be more difficult to pull off.
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post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sekigahara View Post
How do you know it won't solve anything? It certainly won't utterly fix piracy, but will certainly limit piracy to those who have the knowledge and the means to use encryption for their downloads. That will certainly help diminish piracy by making it more difficult than simply downloading uTorrent, searching Pirate Bay, and clicking on a .torrent link.



True, but that is an easy fix. Your ISP will be able to know which machine downloaded it by reading the MAC address and then banning that MAC address from internet access or just monitoring the connection for obvious red flags.



It isn't necessarily easy to get around, and it isn't a matter of enforcing it by law. ISPs such as Comcast are already experimenting with download limits, and the RIAA is just giving them another reason to cap downloads. They're pandering to the ISP companies' desires to regulate their enterprise and allow for more customers to have faster internet connections without the ability to hog network bandwidth by downloading lots and lots of things.



Very true. See above.



It might actually put them in a better situation, since forcing piracy to go underground will diminish their supposed losses due to piracy since it will be more difficult to pull off.
Spoken like a true believer.

Hard to track MAC addresses if they are cloned. If you have the correct firewall/equipment in place, they see 1 MAC address. nothing more. then said traffic comes across the line to the hardware in the residence that splits it where it needs to go. Again, prove it was my machine.

As for the pushing the piracy more underground, there's no real difficulty with enabling encription right now on certain clients for torrent downloads that mask what the information is. Again, not very difficult if you understand what your software is.

As for download caps, Comcast isn't doing anything for the caps besides limiting the downloading of content that they want to sell you. Why would they give a crap about game piracy?? They want the people that are streaming movies from netflix, Joost, and other Internet Television streaming to end because it's cutting into their "digital tier" sales. And that, my friends, is directly from a manager of a comcast franchise in my area. Don't let the BS that the news puts out, the RIAA/MPAA, or anyone else for that matter. Research it yourself, and find the truth.

this entire Piracy thing with the RIAA/MPAA is just a money grab at anything they can get their bloody hands on. What they get from the lawsuits does NOT go to the artists. it's pocket money, plain and simple. you want to support your favorite bands, pay for a concert ticket, buy a shirt at a show, things of that nature.

Again, this entire thing makes me laugh. Keep drinking the Kool-aid... it's good for you!!
Edited by Raziel - 12/22/08 at 1:05pm
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post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raziel View Post
Hard to track MAC addresses if they are cloned. If you have the correct firewall/equipment in place, they see 1 MAC address. nothing more. then said traffic comes across the line to the hardware in the residence that splits it where it needs to go. Again, prove it was my machine.
Lol, have you ever dealt with ISP problems before? They could care less about "proving" anything. If it's your connection, it's your problem. They might let it slide the first time, but if they see it happening again, they'll place restrictions on your connection to make it stop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raziel View Post
As for the pushing the piracy more underground, there's no real difficulty with enabling encription right now on certain clients for torrent downloads that mask what the information is. Again, not very difficult if you understand what your software is.
It might not seem difficult to you or me, but torrenting itself isn't very difficult to do, which has allowed less tech-savvy people to do it easily. People will either have to become more proficient with encryption methods or just stop torrenting altogether, which many kids, preteens, and teens could be forced to do after their parents are contacted by their ISP.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raziel View Post
As for download caps, Comcast isn't doing anything for the caps besides limiting the downloading of content that they want to sell you. Why would they give a crap about game piracy?? They want the people that are streaming movies from netflix, Joost, and other Internet Television streaming to end because it's cutting into their "digital tier" sales. And that, my friends, is directly from a manager of a comcast franchise in my area. Don't let the BS that the news puts out, the RIAA/MPAA, or anyone else for that matter. Research it yourself, and find the truth.
Peer-to-peer torrenting takes up bandwidth. Some ISP companies want to charge for download caps because that's another revenue stream. It might be affected by Comcast's digital distribution, but in the end it's just a matter of sales. It's as simple as that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raziel View Post
this entire Piracy thing with the RIAA/MPAA is just a money grab at anything they can get their bloody hands on. What they get from the lawsuits does NOT go to the artists. it's pocket money, plain and simple. you want to support your favorite bands, pay for a concert ticket, buy a shirt at a show, things of that nature.
Didn't your parents ever teach you "two wrongs don't make a right"? If you don't want to support the corporations that produce and distribute music or movies, then DON'T BUY THEIR MOVIES OR MUSIC. You may not like the company and how it does business, but that is not justification for your illegal actions. That is just an example of selfishly flawed logic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raziel View Post
Spoken like a true believer.

...

Again, this entire thing makes me laugh. Keep drinking the Kool-aid... it's good for you!!
If by drinking the Kool-Aid you mean subscribing to a sense of morality and logical reasoning, then pour me another glass. I'll take it over immorality and false logic any day.
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post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rookie1337 View Post
Well, if the seeders aren't making money, how is it worse than the days of cassette piracy in which people would sell those things for the same price or slightly lower than the legal store(this is not a justification for the act just an observation). And its quite funny to see how some bands that got initial followings through P2P and torrents are now trying to double back and say that they don't support the medium that helped spread them? This has created a huge gray area to me. I understand the artist wanting the money for their work but I really don't know who's making the money off of my purchased CD's or downloads anymore(both the artists and the companies claim they're losing money to the other the last time I cared about this topic). I'd like the artist to get at least 98% per song and then the distributer gets what's left. If that's how its working right now(Idk) then I am probably going to be buying CD's/downloads a lot more, the creator of the work should get the majority of the money not the distributer.
If people understood how the music industry worked, I guarantee they would never support piracy unless they had the blackest of hearts and skewed of moralities. People really don't realize how little in percentages the actual musicians make. Consider two cases, one is small-time (where the band covers all of their own costs and pays for distribution and marketing themselves), and the other big-time (where the band works for a major label who covers publishing, distribution, and marketing).

In small-time the artist most likely has a day job, because there's no way in hell any place besides CDBaby.com is going to take your album if you're not with a label. If the artist is smart, he started his own record company so that he doesn't have to pay half of the CD profits to the record company he signed with. Legally, the record company cannot have the same mailing address as the artist, so he's got to have a mailbox at a post office somewhere just to get half of his money. It's his own time going into advertising, usually by word of mouth.

In big-time, it really makes you wonder if it's worth it. A band signs to a label, and even if you aren't outright ripped off by the label in your contract and managed to get a good deal, you won't see money for a long time. The label hands you some money to record your album and live off of while you're working with the understanding that your CD sales will go directly to that loan before you will see a nickel in profits (this hardly ever happens for newer bands, they end up PAYING MONEY to make an album for a label). The label is technically the record company (so they get to keep the half in profits that was mentioned earlier) so a signed artist will AT THEORETICAL BEST only see $7.50 per sale or so. However, the label also covers distribution, advertising, and publishing, which means they get to keep much more. The BEST-SELLING artists keep 20% of their sales. 20%, and that's only the select amount that are so well known that they are rich anyway because they've managed to remain signed for 10+ years and have had several successful CDs. Consider this: for a CD selling for $15, it's considered AMAZING for an artist to see $4 from it. Keep in mind that this system completely kills new bands. Hardly anybody ever covers their initial cost with their sales, and the label drops them with less money than they started. If I were a signed artist, I would be screaming for every penny I could get, and nothing besides my label would piss me off more than piracy.

I sincerely hope that this opens some eyes and people think before stealing music.
Edited by grmnasasin0227 - 12/22/08 at 1:37pm
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post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by spice003 View Post
or you can just use the encryption with pg2 and see if they catch you downloading stuff
That's what people should do. Wonder how many they can catch using PG2, encryption via uTorrent, and a proxy. Probably not much.
post #29 of 30
Frankly its a pathetic argument for the RIAA, People will forever find new ways to pirate music as technology advances.
    
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post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by grmnasasin0227 View Post
If people understood how the music industry worked, I guarantee they would never support piracy unless they had the blackest of hearts and skewed of moralities. People really don't realize how little in percentages the actual musicians make. Consider two cases, one is small-time (where the band covers all of their own costs and pays for distribution and marketing themselves), and the other big-time (where the band works for a major label who covers publishing, distribution, and marketing).

In small-time the artist most likely has a day job, because there's no way in hell any place besides CDBaby.com is going to take your album if you're not with a label. If the artist is smart, he started his own record company so that he doesn't have to pay half of the CD profits to the record company he signed with. Legally, the record company cannot have the same mailing address as the artist, so he's got to have a mailbox at a post office somewhere just to get half of his money. It's his own time going into advertising, usually by word of mouth.

In big-time, it really makes you wonder if it's worth it. A band signs to a label, and even if you aren't outright ripped off by the label in your contract and managed to get a good deal, you won't see money for a long time. The label hands you some money to record your album and live off of while you're working with the understanding that your CD sales will go directly to that loan before you will see a nickel in profits (this hardly ever happens for newer bands, they end up PAYING MONEY to make an album for a label). The label is technically the record company (so they get to keep the half in profits that was mentioned earlier) so a signed artist will AT THEORETICAL BEST only see $7.50 per sale or so. However, the label also covers distribution, advertising, and publishing, which means they get to keep much more. The BEST-SELLING artists keep 20% of their sales. 20%, and that's only the select amount that are so well known that they are rich anyway because they've managed to remain signed for 10+ years and have had several successful CDs. Consider this: for a CD selling for $15, it's considered AMAZING for an artist to see $4 from it. Keep in mind that this system completely kills new bands. Hardly anybody ever covers their initial cost with their sales, and the label drops them with less money than they started. If I were a signed artist, I would be screaming for every penny I could get, and nothing besides my label would piss me off more than piracy.

I sincerely hope that this opens some eyes and people think before stealing music.
This is true, that's why more people need to be like Nine Inch Nails! Whooo!
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