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FAQ: Planning and Installing Your Liquid Cooling System - Page 5

post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by OC'ing Noob View Post
Should I make a picture/video tutorial to go with this?

G|F.E.A.D|Killa told me not to and leave it to the pros
Yes.
post #42 of 48
Question... whats the difference between the compression fittings and normal fittings? Do compression fittings not require clamps? I didn't plan on using clamps with the compression fittings, but i read in your FAQ that you said to use them.. so i was wondering if that was an exception to the rule.
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post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiveon View Post
Question... whats the difference between the compression fittings and normal fittings? Do compression fittings not require clamps? I didn't plan on using clamps with the compression fittings, but i read in your FAQ that you said to use them.. so i was wondering if that was an exception to the rule.
The guide is just plain barb centric. Perhaps the author had never used compression fittings. Compression fittings are a form of hose clamp in and of themselves. They do not need hose clamps. They do not have anywhere to effectively place a hose clamp on them either.
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post #44 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiveon View Post
Question... whats the difference between the compression fittings and normal fittings? Do compression fittings not require clamps? I didn't plan on using clamps with the compression fittings, but i read in your FAQ that you said to use them.. so i was wondering if that was an exception to the rule.
With normal barb there is no way to secure the tubing to the barb without some type of clamp such as hose clamps or zipties. Compression fittings on the other hand use a compression ring that you screw on to the barb over the tubing to seal it. I personally do not use compression fittings for the following reasons:

- Compression fittings are extremely expensive as opposed to normal barbs. A normal metal barb costs anywhere between $2.50-$4 each barb while a compression barb costs anywhere between $7-10 each barb. The average basic liquid cooling loop involves at the bare minimum 4 barbs assuming you use a plastic T-fitting for a T-line. This means that you will be spending at least an $12 additional expense on a BASIC loop. To me with a loop that 14 barbs, that is a minimum of $42 extra expense for barbs alone! That is simply not worth the extra costs for me.
- Compression fittings also are very specific of tubing size. With a 1/2" compression fittings, you HAVE to use 1/2" ID tubing otherwise it WILL leak. On a 1/2" normal barb, I have the option of using 7/16" Masterkleer tubing which is dirt cheap and forms a better sealant. With compression fittings on the other hand, I would have t purchase the 7/16" compression fittings instead.

Quote:
Originally Posted by astrodanco View Post
The guide is just plain barb centric. Perhaps the author had never used compression fittings. Compression fittings are a form of hose clamp in and of themselves. They do not need hose clamps. They do not have anywhere to effectively place a hose clamp on them either.
Yes I have used compression fittings before and know what they are thank you very much! The compression ring replaces the need for a hose clamp and seals the tubing when you screw it on. I was actually referring to the normal fittings as a lot of members here that use Masterkleer on 1/2" barbs do not use any time of clamping because when the tubing cools down after being boiled, it forms a pretty decent sealing. I was implying to always secure your tubing on the barbs.
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post #45 of 48
Thank you both for your responses. Great thread..
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post #46 of 48
Forgive me for exhuming the thread, but I'd like to ask OC'ing Noob a question.

You recommend to test the assembled loop inside the case; what do you think about a prior testing it outside the case as I have seen in several worklogs? Is it redundant because after putting the loop inside the case it should be tested again anyway?

Thank you very much for the guide. It helps immensely.
Edited by klaidonis - 5/7/10 at 10:17am
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post #47 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by klaidonis View Post
Forgive me for exhuming the thread, but I'd like to ask OC'ing Noob a question.

You recommend to test the assembled loop inside the case; what do you think about a prior testing it outside the case as I have seen in several worklogs? Is it redundant because after putting the loop inside the case it should be tested again anyway?

Thank you very much for the guide. It helps immensely.
There is never any such thing as too much safety testing as it is the future welfare of your PC that we are talking about here. The problems with testing the loop outside the case however are:

- This is not an option for everyone, such as if your loop goes outside your case through tube holes.
- Unscrewing/unmounting the blocks and radiators to move everything outside for testing increases the chances of an accident happening.
- It is easier to keep it in the case and simply remove the motherboard and video card.

When you are testing the loop, the recommended 24 hours is just to look for any micro-cracks or punctures that you may have missed while looking over your tubing and components (especially if they are acrylic) as oppose to waiting for big accidents. Those usually happen within the first half hour of starting your loop. If there was a manufacturing defect that would cause a big accident, it actually usually happens right away.
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post #48 of 48
thanks ya
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