Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Keyboards › [Official] Mechanical Keyboard Guide
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

[Official] Mechanical Keyboard Guide - Page 1149

post #11481 of 14567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tator Tot;12698722 

Ducky > TT Meka G1 > Das Model S Pro > Black Widow

Though if that's the OCN Ducky, it's out of stock right now (restocking underway) so you might as well move onto the Thermaltake Meka G1 or Das Model S Professional.

Just out of curiosity what makes you rank the Ducky ahead of the TT Meka G1 ahead of the Das Model S Pro?

I ask because I was debating between the OCN Ducky with MX Browns (when restocked) or the Das Pro Silent as my first mechanical keyboard. My main consideration between the 2 was if I really cared about the media control functions or not.
Scream Machine
(9 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-4770K Gigabyte Z87X-UD3H EVGA GTX 780 16GB DDR3 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
256GB Samsung 840 Pro Kraken X60 Windows 7 Shimian 2560x1440 
Case
Phantom 630 
  hide details  
Reply
Scream Machine
(9 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-4770K Gigabyte Z87X-UD3H EVGA GTX 780 16GB DDR3 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
256GB Samsung 840 Pro Kraken X60 Windows 7 Shimian 2560x1440 
Case
Phantom 630 
  hide details  
Reply
post #11482 of 14567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xazen;12700254 
Just out of curiosity what makes you rank the Ducky ahead of the TT Meka G1 ahead of the Das Model S Pro?

I ask because I was debating between the OCN Ducky with MX Browns (when restocked) or the Das Pro Silent as my first mechanical keyboard. My main consideration between the 2 was if I really cared about the media control functions or not.
Price is all.
You could also consider the fact that we have more switch options.

Das + Student Discount = $15 cheaper, but none of the features of the ducky but you do get a USB hub.

Meka G1 is a good board, but it's limited to just MX-Blacks and is $30 more than our Ducky's for the same features + USB & Audio. For the price though, the Meka G1 is a sweet board.

If they added backlighting it could be "the" board for gamers (to a certain extent.)

Basically though, it's a Price vs Features debate since they all have a relatively similar level of build quality just different feature sets.
Test Bed
(24 items)
 
TTTbox
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 3570K  Biostar TZ774XE Power Color AX5770 1GB 4x4GB 1866Mhz 9-10-9-27-2T 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB Western Digital Green 2TB Samsung Spinpoint M4 500GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Intel X-25M G2 80GB Lite-On BluRay Drive Arctic Cooling Freezer 13 Pro Windows 7 Ultimate 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Dell U2212HM Deck Legend Frost Tactile Silverstone Strider Plus 750w Custom Acrylic Test Bed 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
Logitech G500 Cooler Master Storm Tactics FPS Beyer Dynamics DT-990 600ohm Samson MediaOne 3A 
AudioAudioOtherOther
FiiO E09k QOGIR FiiO E17 ALPEN Microsoft Lifecam Studio Blue Yeti Pro Microphone 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD A10-A5800K ASRock FM2A85X-ITX Radeon HD7770 1GB 2x8GB 1866mhz C9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
SanDisk Ultra Plus 128GB 2TB 5400 RPM  24x DVD Drive Noctua L9A 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 7 Home Premium 32" IPS TV Logitech K400 Seasonic G360 
CaseMouseAudio
Cooler Master Elite 120 Advanced Logitech K400 Trackpad Custom 2.1 Home Theater Setup 
  hide details  
Reply
Test Bed
(24 items)
 
TTTbox
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 3570K  Biostar TZ774XE Power Color AX5770 1GB 4x4GB 1866Mhz 9-10-9-27-2T 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB Western Digital Green 2TB Samsung Spinpoint M4 500GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Intel X-25M G2 80GB Lite-On BluRay Drive Arctic Cooling Freezer 13 Pro Windows 7 Ultimate 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Dell U2212HM Deck Legend Frost Tactile Silverstone Strider Plus 750w Custom Acrylic Test Bed 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
Logitech G500 Cooler Master Storm Tactics FPS Beyer Dynamics DT-990 600ohm Samson MediaOne 3A 
AudioAudioOtherOther
FiiO E09k QOGIR FiiO E17 ALPEN Microsoft Lifecam Studio Blue Yeti Pro Microphone 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD A10-A5800K ASRock FM2A85X-ITX Radeon HD7770 1GB 2x8GB 1866mhz C9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
SanDisk Ultra Plus 128GB 2TB 5400 RPM  24x DVD Drive Noctua L9A 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 7 Home Premium 32" IPS TV Logitech K400 Seasonic G360 
CaseMouseAudio
Cooler Master Elite 120 Advanced Logitech K400 Trackpad Custom 2.1 Home Theater Setup 
  hide details  
Reply
post #11483 of 14567
Speaking of that Thermaltake board, the guide says that it has dye sublimated keys, which is quite some feat given that it is impossible to dye white onto black keycaps.
Daedalus
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 955 Gigabyte MA78GM-UD2H Gainward 9600GT GS 4GB OCZ Platinum PC2-6400 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
250GB Samsung P120S, 1TB Samsung F1 Window 7 64bit/Arch Linux Samsung 204B 20"/Dell 1701FP IBM Model F and others 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair HX620 Lian-Li V350B Steelseries Ikari Laser 
  hide details  
Reply
Daedalus
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 955 Gigabyte MA78GM-UD2H Gainward 9600GT GS 4GB OCZ Platinum PC2-6400 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
250GB Samsung P120S, 1TB Samsung F1 Window 7 64bit/Arch Linux Samsung 204B 20"/Dell 1701FP IBM Model F and others 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair HX620 Lian-Li V350B Steelseries Ikari Laser 
  hide details  
Reply
post #11484 of 14567
Quote:
Originally Posted by ch_123;12695636 
Now, I don't like to be a grammar Nazi, but... (Quite literally but) when it involves something I wrote magically developing stuff I was told not to do when I was 6 or 7...
Quote:
Black Alps are one of the two most common Alps switch types. Many people do not like these switches due to the fact that they are stiff, bottom out hard, and tend to develop friction in the travel as they wear. Nonetheless, they are an improvement over most rubber dome keyboards.

Became
Quote:
Black Alps are one of the two most common Alps switch types. But many people do not like them because they are stiff, they bottom out hard, and they tend to develop friction in the key travel over time. However, they are still considered by many to be better than rubber dome keyboards.

"But" at the start of a sentence?
Nice catch! I must've been growing really tired by that point.

I'm doing my best to make my "proposal" edits to be as perfect as possible concerning grammar, spelling, style, etc.

So Tator Tot, when it seems like I didn't make any changes, it's because my changes were subtle in order to improve the readability. In other words, I am asking for blind faith here. redface.gif
It's a computer!
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
It's a computer!
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #11485 of 14567
Here is a revision of my proposal for the first 5 posts. smile.gif I fixed every occurrence where I began a sentence with "But" as well as "And". So, thank you for catching that, ch_123!

I also noticed some missing words and other errors. In addition, I improved the readability even more (I went over it word-by-word again).
Post #1 (Click to show)
Fact: Nearly all keyboards that are either sold at retail stores or bundled with computers are rubber dome keyboards (which can also be called "membrane" keyboards). This is the same cheap low-cost design used in things like TV remotes and modern telephones (including cell phones and other mobile devices). This design is used to maximize profits. Yes, this even includes high-end keyboards like the Logitech G19. So, why settle for something that is essentially no better inside than some generic $5.99 keyboard? Even though something like the G19 looks awesome on the outside, it's still just a rubber dome keyboard on the inside.


So why should you consider a mechanical keyboard?
For most people it's all about the feel: mechanical keyboards just make you want to type. With rubber dome keyboards, the key has to be pressed all the way down to the bottom to get it to register. This wastes a lot of energy and causes fatigue because most of your effort is spent pushing down against a solid piece of plastic. The difference between rubber dome and mechanical keyboards becomes very clear once you experience a good mechanical keyboard.

So in contrast, mechanical switches are designed so that they register before bottoming out. This means that you don't have to bottom out in order to get a keystroke to register. Plus they use actual springs (they're spring-loaded)! So all of this makes for a keyboard that works with you and not against you.

Unlike the world of rubber dome keyboards, there are several different types of mechanical switches from which to choose! So you can choose which one you think would be the most comfortable for you because each one has its own feel (and the "clicky" ones add a mechanical click sound). By contrast, almost all rubber dome keyboards generally feel the same. Granted, there are noticeable differences between some rubber dome keyboards, but those differences are not as big as the differences between all of the various types of mechanical switches!

Most mechanical keyboards also have a noticeably superior build quality to most rubber dome keyboards. They're usually heavier too which means that the keyboard will likely never move during intense gaming. Additionally, most mechanical keyboards last significantly longer than rubber domes. On average, most rubber dome keyboards last 5-7 years, while some last 7-10 or slightly longer. It mostly depends on the amount of use as well as how hard the owner presses the keys. The contact area between the rubber dome (the molded dome on the sheet of rubber) and the membrane underneath wears out over time which results in some keys either needing to be pressed harder, or they simply stop working regardless of how hard they're pressed. The rubber itself also wears out, gradually losing its fresh springy feel.

However, most mechanical switches last significantly longer and they generally still feel relatively new even after 10-15 years of daily use. Some even last much longer than that, such as the Buckling Springs (like in the famous older IBM Model Ms). So not only do most mechanical keyboards have a superior build quality to most rubber dome keyboards, but the switch itself is more durable in addition to having a superior feel.

So most people who try a mechanical keyboard for the first time say that they will never go back to using rubber domes ever again! There are even people who take their mechanical keyboard to work every day because they can no longer stand using that rubber dome keyboard at work. Some people have even reported that their typing speed increased because of their mechanical keyboard. Others report a dramatically increased desire to type which is what we mean when we say that good mechanical keyboards make you want to type!


Index:
I still think it would be beneficial to have those images for the purpose of showing rubber dome owners what the inside of their keyboard looks like. It will give them a much better understanding concerning everything this guide is saying.


Terminology (Click to show)
Terminology


Membrane
This is what is found underneath the sheet of rubber in a rubber dome keyboard as well as in keyboards with either the Buckling Springs or Cherry MY switches (so the sheet of rubber domes is the switch type). This membrane is a bit like a printed circuit board because it contains both the circuitry and the contact areas for where the key circuit intersections get completed upon each keypress for the purpose of sending keystroke signals. So a "membrane keyboard" cannot function without it. It would be like trying to use a keyboard that isn't connected to the computer.

Key Blocking and Ghosting
Ghosting is when you press two keys on the keyboard, and a 3rd key - which you didn't press - gets sent to the computer as well. This used to be a problem that required true anti-ghosting, but today this is very rarely seen on even the cheapest modern boards because now manufacturers simply limit the key rollover in order to prevent ghosting (it's a modern form of anti-ghosting that costs less to implement). So the term "anti-ghosting" is being used incorrectly today.

Key Blocking is as simple as it sounds; you press 2 or more keys at the same time, and some get blocked. This is dictated by the "matrix" (the circuit layout on the membrane as well as a PCB) which dictates the keyboard's "key rollover", or "KRO".


Anti-Ghosting
This is an old term that most of today's manufacturers are now using to describe what we know as "key rollover" (or perhaps "improved key rollover"). For example, Microsoft says that the Sidewinder X4 has Anti-Ghosting for up to 26 simultaneous key presses. However, that's not anti-ghosting: it's just 26KRO.

Of course, many other manufacturers (like Razer and Logitech) mention "Anti-Ghosting" too, but they're usually just saying that they have designed the matrix so that we never get blocked keys when using the WASD cluster. It's like saying that their keyboards can seem to have NKRO when using the WASD.

Even Steelseries is doing it: both the 7G and 6Gv2 have NKRO, but they call it "Extreme Anti-Ghosting" instead.

The reason why they are all using this term (even though it's being used incorrectly) is because it sounds cool and therefore it does a better job of selling. It would sound boring if they used the correct terminology because then they couldn't say "Extreme Anti-Ghosting". Perhaps they could use "Extreme Key Rollover", but that obviously doesn't sound as cool and obviously wouldn't sell as easily.


Key Rollover (#KRO and NKRO)
Key Rollover refers to blocked keys when pressing 2 or more keys at the same time. The most common key rollover is 6KRO due to the USB spec limit which means that 6 keys can be pressed simultaneously along with 4 modifiers such as Ctrl, Alt, Shift, Meta (WinKey), Fn, Home, End, etc.

NKRO (or "N Key Rollover") means that the key rollover is completely unlimited. This means that there will never be any blocked keys when pressing multiple keys at the same time.

Up until recently (as of 3/8/11), true NKRO was only possible through PS/2 (but only when it's a specified feature of the keyboard). However, now there are two USB-only mechanical keyboards that feature true NKRO through USB: the Noppoo Choc Mini, and the Ducky DK-9008-G2. Unfortunately, the DK-9008-G2 is not available yet (again, as of 3/8/11). However, these two keyboards are known to be completely incompatible with Mac OSX.

#KRO: where "#" is the amount of key rollover of the keyboard. It generally represents the maximum number of keys that can be pressed simultaneously without having any of them get blocked. For example, some keyboards are strictly 2KRO while most others depend on the "matrix" (which again is the circuit layout on the membrane or PCB) that is described in detail at the bottom of Post #9 (inside of the "hidden text" box).

In addition, many USB-only mechanical keyboards are described as 6KRO which again means 6 keys plus 4 modifiers (Ctrl, Shift, Alt, Home, End, Fn, Meta, etc.). Fortunately, this is generally more than enough for most users, but a few games may have limitations with the typical 6KRO matrix (e.g. StepMania). However, it can also depend on the keyboard due to that matrix layout. So really, having NKRO is generally more about the peace of mind than the actual practicality.

Finally, there is one rubber dome keyboard out there right now (as of 3/8/11) that has 26KRO, thereby overcoming the USB spec limitation: it's the Microsoft Sidewinder X4. However, since this is a mechanical keyboard guide, we won't go into further detail about this keyboard. However, it's still worth mentioning because it's additional evidence (along with the Noppoo Choc Mini and Ducky DK-9008-G2) that we could be looking at a future where most modern rubber dome keyboards have true NKRO through USB! Or, it may even become standard some day!


Key Bouncing
All types of key switches do this, including rubber domes. For an extremely brief moment after a keypress, both rubber dome and mechanical switches bounce up and down a few times while settling back into place. This would cause multiple keystrokes to appear for each single key press, but manufacturers implement a "debouncing delay" to block those additional signals sent by the bouncing switch. So it is like a physical gate that opens and closes very quickly when a key is pressed: it stays open for only a very brief moment to only let the intended keystroke signal through while hopefully blocking any of those additional signals sent due to the switch settling back into place. In a sense, it's like a digital version of a camera's Shutter; only this "shutter" needs to close quickly enough to block the extra key signals while staying open long enough to only let that first signal through. Cherry MX switches need about 5ms of time while rubber domes need longer, depending on their quality.


Polling Rates and Response Times
This is done through USB, and it's only useful and beneficial for mice. For keyboards, any polling rate over 200Hz (at best) is absolutely useless and so it's nothing but market hype. It may even be a bit detrimental because it would be using CPU cycles in order to constantly poll the keyboard. Now, PS/2 keyboards aren't polled at all (including USB keyboards connected to PS/2 with a USB to PS/2 adapter); they simply send the signal to the computer when a key is pressed. This performs what is known as a "hardware interrupt", meaning it forces the computer to register that keystroke the moment it happens.

There are two types of USB transfer modes:

Interrupt Transfer (polling)
The USB controller constantly polls the keyboard (it's constantly monitoring it) so that when a key is pressed, the USB controller turns around and sends an interrupt request. Then the interrupt request gets issued resulting in a sent keystroke signal.

Isochronous Transfer
This reserves a certain amount of bandwidth for the keyboard with a guaranteed latency on the bus. Unfortunately, there are absolutely no keyboards being made today that use this because they're very expensive to manufacturer due to needing a special controller.


So, what's better? PS/2 or USB?
For keyboards, PS/2 wins on three fronts:
  1. Currently, it is the most common way to get N Key Rollover (but NKRO must be a listed feature of the keyboard). It used to be the only way until the Noppoo Choc Mini and the Ducky DK-9008-G2 came along.
  2. Keyboards connected to the PS/2 port aren't polled; they are completely interrupt-based.
  3. It's possible for a keyboard connected to a USB port to be delayed by other USB devices (such as a mouse).


So if you happen to have a keyboard that supports both PS/2 and USB, and if your computer has a purple PS/2 port (the one for keyboards) or even one of those dual purple and green ports, then there's no reason not to use it!
Tator Tot: I updated the Key Bouncing section.


Common Mechanical Switches (Click to show)
Common Mechanical Switches

Introduction - A Switch is Not "Just a Switch"

Generally, most mechanical switches feel better than rubber domes. However, a switch is not "just a switch" (it's possible to be comparing two switches that feel dramatically different from each other). The switch type is the heart of any keyboard; it dictates the feel and sometimes even the sound. So if you're interested in a mechanical keyboard, then the first step is to decide on the switch type.

Mechanical switches are rated by force using either Grams (g) or Centinewtons (cN). However, the proper unit of measurement is Centinewtons (cN) because we're talking about force, not weight. Fortunately, 1g of weight applies about 1cN of downward force which means we can use Grams instead of Centinewtons for the sake of familiarity! So this guide only uses Grams.




Cherry MX Blacks
picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22301
Type: Linear (non-tactile, non-clicky)
Link: Datasheet
Tactile: No
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 60g (40g-80g from the top of the keystroke to the bottom) (Force Diagram)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
The Cherry MX Blacks are considered by most to be the best mechanical switch for gaming. When gaming, having a tactile response is actually unnecessary because you're going to be bottoming out anyway. So linear switches like the Cherry MX Blacks give you a very smooth feel throughout the entire keystroke from the top of the keystroke all the way to the bottom; it's basically just you and the spring.

With the Cherry MX Blacks in particular, both the actuation and release points are at the exact same height in the key travel which means double-tapping is never a problem. The stiffer spring in this switch also helps to prevent accidental key presses (like when gaming) due to "fat-fingering".

However, this relative stiffness in combination with the fact that it's a linear switch makes many people consider the Cherry MX Blacks to be the least desirable mechanical switch for typing in comparison to other mechanical switches. Although, many consider this switch to still be better than rubber domes.


Cherry MX Browns
197803d1298910971-mechanical-keyboard-guide-cherry-mx-brown-animated.gif
Type: Tactile, Non-Clicky
Link: Datasheet
Tactile: Yes
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 45g (55g at the tactile "bump") (Force Diagram)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
The Cherry MX Browns are considered by many to be the perfect middle-ground between typing and gaming. They have a light tactile feel (or "bump") half-way through the key press which basically lets you know that you pressed the key down far enough to actuate. So this "tactile feedback" gives you an indication that you can feel in your fingers regarding when you can release the switch.

The reason why the Cherry MX Browns are considered by many to be a "middle-ground" is because both the reset and actuation points are close enough together in the key travel that you can "ride" the actuation point. This means that you don't have to release the switch all the way back up in order to double-tap; you can keep the switch pressed down right beneath the tactile bump, thereby "riding" the actuation point.


Cherry MX Blues

197802d1298910971-mechanical-keyboard-guide-cherry-mx-blue-animated.gif
Type: Tactile and Clicky
Link: Datasheet
Tactile: Yes; precise
Clicky: Yes
Actuation Force: 50g (60g at the tactile "bump") (Force Diagram)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
The Cherry MX Blues are considered by most to be the best switch for typing that Cherry makes. The tactile feedback has a precise feel that is almost crisp, and the resistance (actuation force) is similar to the average rubber dome keyboard; but of course, the feel is noticeably quite superior.

Unfortunately, this switch makes it harder to double-tap for some gamers because the release point is above the actuation point (see the Force Diagram). This means that it's nearly impossible to ride the actuation point. Instead, the only real way to double-tap with this switch is to let the switch come all the way back up before the 2nd press during the double-tap.

So if you are a gamer, then definitely take these things into consideration. However, most casual gamers have no problem double-tapping with the Cherry MX Blues because they simply hit the key two times in a row very quickly anyway (which means that they always fully release the key in between the two keystrokes).


Cherry MX Clears
197804d1298910971-mechanical-keyboard-guide-cherry-mx-clear-animated.gif
Type: Tactile, Non-Clicky
Link: Datasheet
Tactile: Yes
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 55g (65g at the tactile "bump") (Force Diagram)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
The Cherry MX Clears are often called "stiffer browns", but the tactile "bump" is a bit more pronounced than the Cherry MX Browns. So this can be another "middle-ground" switch. The force required to press the switch down is comparable to most rubber dome keyboards.

It's believed that the spring in this switch is the same spring in the MX Blacks.


Cherry MX Reds
197801d1298910971-mechanical-keyboard-guide-cherry-mx-red-animated.gif
Type: Linear (non-tactile, non-clicky)
Link: Datasheet
Tactile: No
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 45g (Force Diagram)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
The Cherry MX Reds are basically a 45g version of the MX Blacks. Like the Blacks, it can be considered to be good for gaming. However, some people find that this switch is not as good for gaming or typing as the other MX switches because they feel that it's too light. However, other people consider this one to be the "poor man's Topre". Some keyboard manufacturers even use it for "Special Edition" keyboards.

Note: it very difficult to find keyboards with this switch.


Buckling Springs
picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22295
Type: Tactile and Clicky
Link: Patent
Tactile: Yes; very precise
Clicky: Yes; loud
Actuation Force: 65g-70g (Force Diagram)
Key Travel: 2.3mm to actuation, 3.7mm to bottom
The "Buckling Springs" switch type is very simple design: the buckling action causes the "hammer" at the bottom to make contact with the "membrane" (as described in the Terminology section) which completes a circuit thereby sending the keystroke signal.

The buckling action of the spring provides both the tactile feedback as well as the click (which many consider to be a very satisfying sound). Some might say that the click is produced when the spring hits the shaft wall, but the source of the click becomes obvious when the key is released because it makes another loud click on the way back up.

It's a noisy design, but there are many mechanical keyboard enthusiasts who absolutely love all the sounds that this design makes. Plus, different keyboard designs naturally have different acoustics which directly affects the character of the sound. For example: the Unicomp SpaceSaver has a different sound than the Unicomp Customizer due to the difference in size on both the outside and inside: the SpaceSaver sounds slightly quieter and the springs seem to ring less.



Black Alps
picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22298
Type: Tactile, Non-Clicky
Tactile: Yes
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: The "Simplified" model is 60g, and the "Complicated" model is 70g (Force Diagram)
Key Travel: 3.5mm
Black Alps are one of the two most common Alps switch types. However, many people do not like them because they are stiff, they bottom out hard, and they tend to develop friction in the key travel over time. However, they are still considered by many to be better than rubber dome keyboards.

Note: there are two different versions of the Black Alps: an older one known as the "Complicated Black Alps", and a relatively newer one known as the "Simplified Black Alps". The "Complicated" version was so named due to the larger number of parts in the switch as compared to the "Simplified" version. The "Simplified" version was manufactured by Alps and some other companies.

The "Complicated" version is common in many older mechanical keyboards, particularly the famous Dell AT101W which is a very popular mechanical keyboard that came out of the 1990s.

The most popular Simplified Black Alps switch is made by a company called Fukka (pronounced "Foo-kah") which was used in the ABS M1. The Fukka version of this switch has less resistance, but many claim that its tactility isn't as solid as the Complicated Black Alps.


White Alps
picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22381
Type: Tactile and Clicky
Tactile: Yes
Clicky: Yes
Actuation Force: 60g-70g (Force Diagram)
Key Travel: 3.5mm
The White Alps switch is one of the most common Alps switches. These are far more popular than the Black Alps because the tactile response is more pronounced, and some versions even require less force to actuate. Unfortunately, this switch is like the Black Alps in that it's much easier to bottom out on these in comparison to other mechanical switches.

As with the Black Alps, there are "Complicated" and "Simplified" White Alps. The two most popular Simplified White Alps switches are the Fukkas and the XM. The XM is almost universally considered to be a terrible switch; it was used in some older Filco Zero models and some vintage keyboards as well. However, the Fukka switch is quite popular and some people prefer it over the "Complicated" version. The Fukka White Alps are used in some current-production keyboards such as today's Filco Zero. The Complicated White Alps were used on some well-made keyboards from the 90s such as the Northgate and Focus keyboards.

There is also a variety of switches that are similar to the White Alps, but have a varying quality. Some are considered very pleasant to type on, such as the SMK Montereys. Some even prefer the SMK Montereys over the Cherry MX Blues!



Topre Capacitive
picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22304(larger image)
Type:
Tactile, Non-Clicky
Link: Patent
Tactile: Yes
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 30g, 35g, 45g, 55g depending on model (Force Diagram)
Key Travel: 4mm
The Topre Capacitive switches are capacitive by nature, and they are basically a hybrid switch between mechanical and rubber dome. This switch type uses a spring underneath a rubber dome (alternative side-view diagram); the depression of the spring causes a change in capacitance between the underlying capacitor pads. So actuation occurs as a result of this change in capacitance.

Topre Capacitive switches are considered by many to be the finest switches available because they offer a very enjoyable typing experience with a much quieter sound, even when bottoming out. These switches also have the smoothest force gradient, even when compared to linear switches like Cherry MX Reds and Blacks!
I still think the scissor switches should be included because it has a mechanical design element. I mean, I think that it's technically a "mechanical" switch due to the mechanical scissor action.


Keycap Plastics and Design (Click to show)
Keycap Plastics and Design

Keycap Plastics:

The two most common keycap plastics are ABS and PBT. Each has their own price-to-performance ratio. Although in general, keycaps made from PBT are usually a better buy. Here's why:

PBT Plastic (Polybutylene Terephthalate)
  • Can withstand extreme heat up to 150°C (302°F)
  • Resistant to solvents, such as common cleaning alcohols
  • Structurally very strong
  • Does not "shine" as fast due to wearing down
  • More solid feel and sound due to heavier weight, which is attractive to many enthusiasts

ABS Plastic (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene)
  • Solvents, such as common cleaning alcohols cause the plastic to "melt"
  • Keys develop the aforementioned "shine" faster
  • Structurally weaker than PBT
  • Lightweight


ABS is also used to make Legos®.


Keytop Shapes:


Cylindrical - Almost all of today's keyboards use this shape. The shape is more ergonomic for our fingertips.

picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22316



Flat - Frequently found on laptops and "laptop style" keyboards. These are also found on Point of Sale (aka "POS") keyboards because they can attach replaceable plastic legends on top.

picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22317
Note: most keyboards with this design use the "Scissor" switch type which is a special rubber dome design that has a plastic scissor-action mechanism on top of each dome. The most famous one is found in certain Lenovo Thinkpads and certain separate Lenovo Thinkpad keyboards. It's also found in Logitech boards that have the PerfectStroke™ key system.



Spherical
- This shape is normally found on vintage keyboards and typewriters

picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22315




Overall Design Shapes:


Sculpted (the vast majority of today's keyboards use this design)

MajestouchSide.png

This design is meant to be ergonomic.



Flat

deck_legend_edge.png

Pictured is a Deck Legend, but all of Deck's keyboards use this design.

Even though the Sculpted design is intended to be ergonomic, it's still all completely personal preference.


Keycap Printing Methods (Click to show)
Keycap Printing Methods

Pad

This type of printing is found on almost all of today's keyboards. It is the cheapest method possible to manufacturer (short of leaving the keys blank). Pad-printed letters and graphics are somewhat similar stickers or decals, and it can be felt because the the printing is somewhat raised.

Example: (Microsoft Ergo Keyboard)

picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22312

Pros:
  • Results in a lower selling price
  • A single key can be multicolored
  • Can be used on both the top and the sides
Cons:
  • The printing can be felt
  • Wears out quickly


Laser Etching
Laser-etched keys feel a bit "scratchy". The process works best on light-colored keys because the letter always comes out black because the laser literally burns the plastic. So when it's used on black keys, a paint filler is poured into the etching.

Example: (Dell AT101W)

picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22311

Pros:
  • Doesn't wear out as easily
Cons:
  • The etching can be felt
  • Slightly blurry


Dye Sublimation
Dye Sublimation produces much nicer results than the two printing methods mentioned above. A dye is set into the plastic and then this dye also seeps a few microns into the plastic. So as the plastic starts to wear down from use, the "printing" remains looking like new. Unfortunately, the only companies who still use it are Topre, Cherry Corp, and Unicomp due to the higher manufacturing cost.

Example:

picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22313

Pros:
  • Very long-lasting (usually for the entire life of the keyboard)
  • Can't feel the printing
  • A single key can be multicolored
  • Can be used on any face of the key, top or side
  • High visibility
Cons:
  • Higher manufacturing cost
  • Higher selling price
  • Can only print letters that are darker than the plastic (for example: no white lettering on black plastic)


Double-Shot Injection Molding
With this method, the keycap actually consists of two pieces: the first piece makes up the outside of the keycap with the "printing" cut out of it. The second piece is placed inside of the first piece with the lettering embossed to fit. You can see it in this diagram:

picture.php?albumid=2267&pictureid=13189

This method results in the highest quality keycaps possible. The edges of the letters are perfectly sharp, and it achieves the highest contrast resulting in the clearest lettering possible. Unfortunately, TG3 Electronics (Deck Keyboards) is the only manufacturer who is still using this method on their keyboards due to the higher manufacturing cost. Although, Fentek and Signature Plastics can create custom keycaps using this method.

Example: OCN Keycap
picture.php?albumid=3859&pictureid=22310

The easiest way to verify if a key is double shot molded is to check underneath as shown above.


Pros:
  • Never wears out
  • Perfect edges resulting in ultra sharp letters and characters
  • Highest contrast and visibility
Cons:
  • Highest cost
  • Limited to two colors per key
  • On some very worn keys, the edges can be felt where the two plastics meet



Quote:
Originally Posted by Tator Tot;12694840 
Once you take it, keep the width to 600px and PM it to me then.

As for the Wiki question; Wiki's pictures fall under the CCL, so we can take and alter then ass needed with due credits.

@TwoCables,
For your question:
Yes, your shutter analogy is a good example. Though I think we should leave it as is; or at least sum it up in a better fashion.

The way you put it makes it sound like, in that regard, domes and mechanical switches are equals when they are not. As the mechanical switches noted (Cherry MX type) have less of a delay.
I updated it. smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tator Tot;12694840 
On post #3
Scissor Switches are not mechanical. Also, what updates did you make?
Both small and major changes to the readability in regards to all rules of English. My goal is to make it perfect. So, I'm asking for blind faith. redface.gif I mean, it would take me 2-3 times longer just to highlight all of my changes in addition to making those changes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tator Tot;12694840 
Besides the Buckling Springs part, which isn't an accurate reflection at all.
Then what is an accurate reflection? I changed it based on recommendations from other regular visitors to this thread (I was corrected regarding what makes the click).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tator Tot;12694840 
For Post #4
I'll get that section added on overall design.

Post #5
What changes are you suggesting?

Post #1
I removed that as it's excess bloat. Most people have domes in front of them. They can try that; they are familiar with them. They don't need those fine details.
It seems to me that most people are afraid to take their rubber dome keyboards apart. So including these pictures emphasizes the internal differences between the rubber dome and mechanical switch technologies. The result is that people understand why rubber dome keyboards are cheaper to make and why they all feel basically the same. They also end up with a clearer understanding when they see either rubber dome keyboards mentioned, or just the switch technology itself.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tator Tot;12694840 
Mechanical Switches are new to them. They need those details.
I didn't know what the inside of my rubber dome keyboards looked like until I saw this thread. It wasn't because I took my keyboard apart, but it was because of the pictures. It also enabled me to understand the differences rather than just relying on text. After all, a picture is worth a thousand words.
Edited by TwoCables - 3/12/11 at 9:04am
It's a computer!
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
It's a computer!
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #11486 of 14567
If you're going to have pictures of the inside of a rubber dome keyboard, at least use a picture of a representative design. That graphite on rubber dome over PCB design is extremely rare.
post #11487 of 14567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus2129;12704952 
If you're going to have pictures of the inside of a rubber dome keyboard, at least use a picture of a representative design. That graphite on rubber dome over PCB design is extremely rare.
I don't know which picture you're talking about. Can you show me?
It's a computer!
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
It's a computer!
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #11488 of 14567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus2129;12704952 
If you're going to have pictures of the inside of a rubber dome keyboard, at least use a picture of a representative design. That graphite on rubber dome over PCB design is extremely rare.

Quite common in console controllers and handheld consoles like the Nintendo DS (was helping a friend fix one of those things yesterday... never again)

For computer keyboards? Yes, very rare indeed.
Quote:
(Dye sub section)
Higher manufacturing cost
Higher selling price

Superfluous duplication of information is superfluous.
Quote:
For example: the Unicomp SpaceSaver has a different sound than the Unicomp Customizer due to the difference in size on both the outside and inside: the SpaceSaver sounds slightly quieter and the springs seem to ring less.

Is this for definite?

Quick experiment with one of my Model Ms suggests that what sort of casing it is in doesn't have any noteworthy impact on the noise generated.
Edited by ch_123 - 3/12/11 at 9:50am
Daedalus
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 955 Gigabyte MA78GM-UD2H Gainward 9600GT GS 4GB OCZ Platinum PC2-6400 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
250GB Samsung P120S, 1TB Samsung F1 Window 7 64bit/Arch Linux Samsung 204B 20"/Dell 1701FP IBM Model F and others 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair HX620 Lian-Li V350B Steelseries Ikari Laser 
  hide details  
Reply
Daedalus
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 955 Gigabyte MA78GM-UD2H Gainward 9600GT GS 4GB OCZ Platinum PC2-6400 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
250GB Samsung P120S, 1TB Samsung F1 Window 7 64bit/Arch Linux Samsung 204B 20"/Dell 1701FP IBM Model F and others 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair HX620 Lian-Li V350B Steelseries Ikari Laser 
  hide details  
Reply
post #11489 of 14567
Quote:
Originally Posted by ch_123;12705195 
Quite common in console controllers and handheld consoles like the Nintendo DS (was helping a friend fix one of those things yesterday... never again)

For computer keyboards? Yes, very rare indeed.



Superfluous duplication of information is superfluous.
Thank you, I guess.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ch_123;12705195 
Is this for definite?

Quick experiment with one of my Model Ms suggests that what sort of casing it is in doesn't have any noteworthy impact on the noise generated.
I'm only going by what I saw and actually heard at GeekHack; the smaller one had less spring ring.
It's a computer!
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
It's a computer!
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #11490 of 14567
There's a huge number of variables in what a buckling spring keyboard is going to sound like. In general, they're all the same thing, but there are minor variances from board to board, and across the age and condition in which the keyboard is in.

Buckling spring keyboards are funny things, and people have jumped to various conclusions about things like sound, feel and build quality of different generations and types of buckling spring keyboard. In general, it's best to not read into these things too much.
Quote:
Ghosting is when you press two keys on the keyboard, and a 3rd key - which you didn't press - gets sent to the computer as well. This used to be a problem that required true anti-ghosting, but today this is very rarely seen on even the cheapest modern boards because now manufacturers simply limit the key rollover in order to prevent ghosting (it's a modern form of anti-ghosting that costs less to implement). So the term "anti-ghosting" is being used incorrectly today.

Key Blocking is as simple as it sounds; you press 2 or more keys at the same time, and some get blocked. This is dictated by the "matrix" (the circuit layout on the membrane as well as a PCB) which dictates the keyboard's "key rollover", or "KRO".

As far as I know, the only way to anti-ghost is to either make it NKRO, or to make it block. If I am wrong, I would like to know.
Quote:
(Flat keys)

The most famous one is found in certain Lenovo Thinkpads and certain separate Lenovo Thinkpad keyboards.

I'm not sure if there are any external Thinkpad keyboards with chiclet keys. Only the low end X100/X120 has flat keys, all the rest have sculpted ones.

I would have imagined that Apple's Aluminium keyboard is the most famous flat keyboard.
Edited by ch_123 - 3/12/11 at 10:23am
Daedalus
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 955 Gigabyte MA78GM-UD2H Gainward 9600GT GS 4GB OCZ Platinum PC2-6400 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
250GB Samsung P120S, 1TB Samsung F1 Window 7 64bit/Arch Linux Samsung 204B 20"/Dell 1701FP IBM Model F and others 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair HX620 Lian-Li V350B Steelseries Ikari Laser 
  hide details  
Reply
Daedalus
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 955 Gigabyte MA78GM-UD2H Gainward 9600GT GS 4GB OCZ Platinum PC2-6400 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
250GB Samsung P120S, 1TB Samsung F1 Window 7 64bit/Arch Linux Samsung 204B 20"/Dell 1701FP IBM Model F and others 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair HX620 Lian-Li V350B Steelseries Ikari Laser 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Keyboards
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Keyboards › [Official] Mechanical Keyboard Guide