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[Official] The CoolerMaster Storm Scout, Scout II Club - Page 2617

Poll Results: What is your Overall Opinion on this case

 
  • 49% (929)
    Great
  • 30% (573)
    Good
  • 12% (226)
    Meh
  • 1% (27)
    Bad
  • 5% (108)
    SUX
1863 Total Votes  
post #26161 of 28613
jeah got some black paint and i painted the old clear fans and they look just like troopers led fans
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
phenom II x4 965 black edition asus m5a99x-evo EAH6950/2DI2S/2GD5 Kingston HyperX 2x4GB, DDR3 1866MHz, CL11 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
seagate barracuda asus 24x drive coolermaster hyper 212-evo windows 7 ultimate 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
samsung sync master ta550 27` logitech g510 corsair cx500 cm storm scout 
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razer death adder mouse pad from work razer electra a-link wireless wlan 
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
phenom II x4 965 black edition asus m5a99x-evo EAH6950/2DI2S/2GD5 Kingston HyperX 2x4GB, DDR3 1866MHz, CL11 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
seagate barracuda asus 24x drive coolermaster hyper 212-evo windows 7 ultimate 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
samsung sync master ta550 27` logitech g510 corsair cx500 cm storm scout 
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razer death adder mouse pad from work razer electra a-link wireless wlan 
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post #26162 of 28613
Hey guys, this question has been haunting me for several years now..

Why do cpu's use multipliers. i mean isn't it easier to just
raise the clock of the cpu to the desires speed?
In stead of that you get a speed of let's say 133 mhz x 10.
Isn't it better to just take the first? Is it because of heat or
something, because I can find everything about the multiplier it self on wikipedia, just not WHY.bulb.gif

Also, what does this say to you?
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/434?vs=444
Edited by Aryan1171 - 8/9/12 at 7:53am
post #26163 of 28613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aryan1171 View Post

Hey guys, this question has been haunting me for several years now..
Why do cpu's use multipliers. i mean isn't it easier to just
raise the clock of the cpu to the desires speed?
In stead of that you get a speed of let's say 133 mhz x 10.
Isn't it better to just take the first? Is it because of heat or
something, because I can find everything about the multiplier it self on wikipedia, just not WHY.bulb.gif
Also, what does this say to you?
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/434?vs=444

I'm still learning, but my basic understanding (so far) of the introduction of CPU multipliers leads me to this explanation:

In early motherboards, the clock chip ran all mobo chips at the same speed as the CPU. After a while they found that CPUs could run much faster than the other chips on the board and came up with clock-multiplying CPUs to allow their speed to rise without affecting the rest of the motherboard. The additional processing that happens during these extra clock cycles and the data created is moved back and forth in the caches - not sent out on external buses until they are ready.

So - now we have 2 speeds to think about, the internal CPU speed and then the speed at which it communicates with the address & external busses. The first multiplier was only 2x. If they didn't start using multipliers we'd be using much slower computers today.

Nowadays when a CPU needs to run faster, we have the technology to increase its speed using really high multipliers. For example - the Ivy Bridge has a model that uses a 45x multiplier on 100MHz - imagine all the motherboard chips having to deal with running at 4,500MHz instead of at 100MHz?

The motherboards we buy today certainly woulldn't be priced as low as $200 for an X79. The modern CPU is expensive considering that it is but a single chip - but it has much higher stresses and capabilities than all the other chips on a motherboard. If the others ran at the same exact speed they'd all need massive chip coolers as well!

It's an entertaining thought to try to picture such a thing - you'd be needing such a huge case to hold it and the cooling required would be astonishing. A complete redesign of all the components would be needed - and established industry standards would have to go out the window. Also - depending on what MHz CPU you wanted, all your components would need to handle it.

Thankfully, if you have the desire to increase your CPU speed today on an overclockable CPU you are only affecting it, not the rest of your system - and everything works out just fine!

HTH...
Edited by stratosrally - 8/9/12 at 9:16am
post #26164 of 28613
Quote:
Originally Posted by stratosrally View Post

I'm still learning, but my basic understanding (so far) of the introduction of CPU multipliers leads me to this explanation:
In early motherboards, the clock chip ran all mobo chips at the same speed as the CPU. After a while they found that CPUs could run much faster than the other chips on the board and came up with clock-multiplying CPUs to allow their speed to rise without affecting the rest of the motherboard. The additional processing that happens during these extra clock cycles and the data created is moved back and forth in the caches - not sent out on external buses until they are ready.
So - now we have 2 speeds to think about, the internal CPU speed and then the speed at which it communicates with the address & external busses. The first multiplier was only 2x. If they didn't start using multipliers we'd be using much slower computers today.
Nowadays when a CPU needs to run faster, we have the technology to increase its speed using really high multipliers. For example - the Ivy Bridge has a model that uses a 45x multiplier on 100MHz - imagine all the motherboard chips having to deal with running at 4,500MHz instead of at 100MHz?
The motherboards we buy today certainly woulldn't be priced as low as $200 for an X79. The modern CPU is expensive considering that it is but a single chip - but it has much higher stresses and capabilities than all the other chips on a motherboard. If the others ran at the same exact speed they'd all need massive chip coolers as well!
It's an entertaining thought to try to picture such a thing - you'd be needing such a huge case to hold it and the cooling required would be astonishing. A complete redesign of all the components would be needed - and established industry standards would have to go out the window. Also - depending on what MHz CPU you wanted, all your components would need to handle it.
Thankfully, if you have the desire to increase your CPU speed today on an overclockable CPU you are only affecting it, not the rest of your system - and everything works out just fine!
HTH...

thanks alot, that cleared a lot for me!!!
post #26165 of 28613
here is mine

what do you guys think?
post #26166 of 28613
Hey man that's a great start....but what video card are you going with, and I take it your hd is in the 3.5 to 5.25 adapter. AND IT WORKS!!!
post #26167 of 28613
At the moment there is a 5450 in there as a temp but I plan on getting two 7870's the only problem right now is money to finish it up with the cards some sleeving and some more drives and yes the HD is in the 5.25 but its mounted to the bottom of a 5.25 to 3.5 with a card reader in the 3.5.
post #26168 of 28613
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadow water View Post

here is mine

what do you guys think?

Great setup man!
what gpu are you using? it looks like a passive cooled one.
any way great clean build!

Edit: a 5450, didn't notice you last post :3
post #26169 of 28613
Thanks aryan I do plan on a lot of upgrades that's why that monster psu is in there lol. Ill take some better pics when I'm at my computer and post them to show where the hd is and how everything is wired
post #26170 of 28613
Got most of my build done today, if you guys want to check it out.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 3750K Gigabyte GA-Z68MX-UD2H-B3 eVGA GTX 660ti SC 16GB Corsair 1600 DDR3 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Corsair CSSD-F60GB2-A Seagate ST3750640SV OCZ-AGILITY3 Patriot PE32GS25SSDR 
Optical DriveCoolingCoolingCooling
HL GS20N (Apple Super Drive) Swiftech MCP655 8 x Corsair Extreme Performance SP120 Fans XSPC Raystorm 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
EK-VGA Supremacy Bridge Edition Apple OSX 10.8.4 AsusVE258 Acer X223w 
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 3750K Gigabyte GA-Z68MX-UD2H-B3 eVGA GTX 660ti SC 16GB Corsair 1600 DDR3 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Corsair CSSD-F60GB2-A Seagate ST3750640SV OCZ-AGILITY3 Patriot PE32GS25SSDR 
Optical DriveCoolingCoolingCooling
HL GS20N (Apple Super Drive) Swiftech MCP655 8 x Corsair Extreme Performance SP120 Fans XSPC Raystorm 
CoolingOSMonitorMonitor
EK-VGA Supremacy Bridge Edition Apple OSX 10.8.4 AsusVE258 Acer X223w 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Apple Slim OCZ StealthXstream 2 600W Silverstone FT03 Logitech G600 
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