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The real Green Machine (lots of pics, have fun 56K) - Page 9

post #81 of 246
Thread Starter 
By the way: I should be done sanding within the hour, no clue how long the lapping will take. I guess I'll have Stage 1.5 ready to show within 2-3hrs.

Bricks shall be shat.
post #82 of 246
Thread Starter 
Call me clinically insane, but I have to pat myself on the back. I didn't know my balls were that big and hairy that I would have been able to pull off what you are about to read. But let's start from where we left off, shall we?





As you may or may not know, there is a risky little procedure called "IHS removal" that basically leaves you with a buck nekkid CPU. Most of the current Intel processors are soldered to their IHS, making the removal not just very difficult, but insanely dangerous as you risk tearing off the die from the PCB if you are not careful enough, or simply clumsy. The benefits are obvious: The heatsink has direct contact to the die, giving you better cooling and the possibility to OC even higher.

Well, Teh RheY decided that this was a good way to fugger around with his brand new 200€ CPU.

The procedure is pretty basic: Cut the glue between the processor's PCB and the IHS, then desolder it with heat. Sounds pretty easy, huh? Well if jamming razor blades into your CPU and lighting it with fire is your thing, you should give it a try!


I will write this as a quasi-guide for anyone who is crazy enough to do this too. There are various ways to do the cutting, just as there are different ways to desolder the IHS itself. This is the way I felt was best for my needs.



DISCLAIMER:
What you are about to encounter may be considered to be painful to your computer. Be sure to turn your screen away from it so it must not endure watching this butchery.

PROPER DISCLAIMER:
If you try this at home, I am not to be held responsible for any damage you make. If you fupped uck, it's your own damn fault for listening to a crazy German on an overclocking forum. If I jump from a bridge and survive, this may not necessarily apply to you either.




So here's my run on it:

Unfortunately I forgot to make pictures of how I started cutting the PCB glue, I guess I was too excited. Anyway, you take a prepped razor blade (see pics below) and start in one corner, slowly cutting back and forth until you are approximately behind the little IHS step, or rim. MAKE SURE that you try and keep the blade pointed slightly upwards, or at least not downwards. The PCB is EXTREMELY sensitive and even the slightest cut into it may fataly damage your CPU.
You have then successfully made your first cut through the PCB's rubber, yay! You have also just voided your warranty and are eligible to any fudd-up you do from here onwards. But let's continue...

With the blade still in place, slowly cut your way jigsaw style to the next corner. be sure not to cut too deep, try and stay maybe 1-2mm behind the rim at the deepest point. If you are unsure how far that is, take your razor blade, place it ontop of the IHS and align it parallel to the rim. Then take a waterproof pen and mark that line on the blade. When cutting, try not to exceed said line by too much, but be sure to cut the glue all the way through. You will notice this when the blade can go along the rim easily with not a lot of pressure.

Anyway, you're slowly moving around to all four corners of the IHS. After that, prep three more blades the same way and position them like this:




Yeah: Add a thick layer of TIM on the CPU. You'll see why in a bit.
Take a large piece of duct tape and stick the blades together, like raising walls on a house building site. This little construction should look like a cube with one side open:



This will add pressure to the IHS and will make it pop off faster when the solder is liquid. Note that the solder must be liquid ALL THE WAY or you may risk tearing off the top of your die by this procedure. You can avoid this by adding a high temperature for a short while, instead of slowly waiting for the solder to liquify with low temperatures.

Next you will need a flat pot, or a pan.
I will first show you how not to do it, and how I nearly tore off the die like I said before.

I read in another guide that the solder liquifies at 80-90°C. So I set the heat on the stove to a low setting and measured the temperature:





DO NOT DO IT THIS WAY WHEN USING THE PRESSURE PROCEDURE LIKE I DID!!!
I had the CPU in for well over two minutes and nothing happened, luckily. As said if the solder melts too slowly, it will be gooey and you risk tearing the die. I cannot repeat this often enough.


How to do it right: MAX THE STOVE TEMP, WAIT A FEW MINUTES AND PUT IN THE CPU.
Before putting it in, I measured the temp again, but that small sensor can only go up to 200°C, everything above will be inaccurate. But I measured 240°C, but it could be well over 300.

THE IHS WILL SEPARATE VERY FAST!!! It popped off in about 2-3 seconds after laying in the CPU, so be prepared to burn your fingers by QUICKLY getting your CPU out of the heat. Your kitchen will smell a bit of burnt TIM. The TIM was to get the heat faster and more even onto the CPU. I'm sure it will work without it, but I wanted to be more safe than sorry. I'm sure you would be too.

This should be laying in the pot, cooling off:




And this should be your CPU:




Note: I did this yesterday at around 4am. I had no idea if the thing even worked anymore until I threw on the system about an hour ago
But let's stay optimistic and continue.

You will want to have the dies as smooth as possible, so start scraping off the remaining solder CARYFULLY with a razor blade.




I bent the blade slightly to have a more accurate cutting point, so you can be more precise and go less risk of doing any possible damage.




When done, this is how it should look like:




Now I needed to relax my nerves (I was still shaking from the instant pop when the IHS flew off), so I left everything as it is and continued with other parts of the build in the meantime.

Today I finally bought a sheet of 180 grit sanding paper, so I could finally continue my TRUE lapping.
Oh yeah: Remember that I had the brilliant idea of using a sheet of neoprene as an anti-slip mat under the glass? Well it turned out to be a DUMB idea:



I accidentally stepped on the glass when walking around, well I was jumping around dodging all the parts and junk lying in my apartment, and the softness of the neoprene gave in and popped the glass. I am sure this wouldn't have happened if I had used the glass flat on the ground.
Dumb idea, part two:



Duct tape loves neoprene. A lot.



I was able to remove most of the duct tape, luckily. So it's still usable to about 80%.




Let me describe to you how you properly sand a heatsink. I haven't read one proper guide on any forum yet, and this bothers me.

You put the sanding surface on the ground, not a table. Reason is that you can then kneel on the floor (take a pillow), with the workplace between your legs, so you can add an even pressure of your upper body onto the heatsink. If you just hold it infront of you, you will not apply even pressure. The further you move away from the part, the less pressure you are applying on the side farthest away from you. Simple logic, isn't it?

Here is how you hold the TRUE:



Use both hands and do a circular motion. Do not do linear moves, no crosses or any other fancy move. You may look cooler doing it linear, but your sanding 50€ worth of copper, not scratching a turntable.
Here is why: The same logic applies with the linear movement as with the body position: When pushing the heatsink away from yourself, you apply uneven pressure to it, resulting with a crooked surface in the long run. And we're trying to get away from the unevenness, aren't we?
The right way: Do a small circular movement WITHOUT APPLYING EXTRA PRESSURE! The heatsink's own weight will do the trick. Pushing down on it will result with more pressure being applied on some points than the other. It may be a solid piece of metal, but you aren't bending it, you are just moving it around with uneven applied pressure.

Count your circles. I'm not joking. Do fifty circular motions, then turn the heatsink by 180° and rotate it in the same direction for another fifty moves. You do this because even if you aren't applying pressure, the circular movement has a momentum that gives the surface a SLIGHT uneven pressure balance. You balance this out by rotating it and doing the same amount of circles in with the heatsink back to front.
If you are too lazy to count, then you can use a stop watch. But as you are never doing the same speed, counting is the more acurate way of doing this.

Wash the sand paper regularly, or at least wipe it off to get the copper out of it. Not only will the sanding performance improve, but you will also have less metal scratching itself into the heatsink's surface.


Now that you know how it goes, here are my procedural results:





And the final result, after applying the finest 1200 grit paper and the three different lapping polishing compounds that were supplied:




I am happy.




Now, let's get the CPU all shiny too, shall we?

Remember you are sanding off solder from silicone, so be VERY CAREFUL! Wash ANY metal off of the paper, keep the paper as flat as possible at ANY TIME (better yet: glue the paper to the glass so it doesn't bulge when getting soaked), do small circles and move SLOWLY. I only counted to a maximum of twenty in each direction so I could check the surface as often as possible. Since the solder isn't 100% flat before sanding and you don't want to risk damaging the silicone, rotate the CPU by 90% if the solder get's removed unevenly.
Like this: 20 circles, 180°, 20 circles. Check surface. Rotate so that the corner with the most solder is at the front of the circle movement, the repeat.

In the end, it should look like this:




And after applying the polishing compounds, like this:




I have a lapped CPU die. How many people do you know who can say that?



Okay. So now that everything is ready, it's time to install everything.
Since the CPU is significantly lower now, you cannot use the standard CPU retention module from the socket, as the heatsink will not touch the die. So we remove it:




Next we add some padding so that you minimize the risk of the heatsink landing crooked on the die. The last thing you want is to tighten the screws and the die cracks because the heatsink was ontop with an angle. This is where the 3mm thick neoprene comes in handy. Lay it underneath the CPU and use a scissors to cut it slightly smaller than the CPU:



Then use a marker and a knife and make an aligned hole for the die to touch the heatsink:




Perfect fit.




Take it back off, apply some TIM and put it on the socket.




So not only is the CPU flatter, but the heatsink too. So the TRUE's mounting brackets aren't effective anymore. It is recommended to add a washer or something anyway, even if you don't lap the TRUE or remove the IHS.

I did multiple steps to ensure maximum pressure.





Yes, those are two metal washer that I stuck together with superglue.


Carefully put the TRUE in place. Don'T worry about smudging the TIM, it isn't touching. You can even pick it up again and look.

Remember the piece of neoprene you cut out of the spacer? Use this now:





It will work as an anti-slip mat when putting on the washers and tightening the screws.

I also added washer to the screws to add even more pressure.




Then tighten the whole thing.


Edited by Rayce185 - 7/14/09 at 1:22am
post #83 of 246
Thread Starter 
Next, you take it back off.

Yes, you heard right. I'm taking it off again. You have to know if the pressure is enough for the TRUE to squash the neoprene spacer and apply enough pressure on the die to be effective:



See? It wasn't. Now what do you think would have happened if you turned on the PC? Fried silicone, anyone? ALWAYS check.

I added some plastic washer to the screws, as I ran out of metal ones. This time two per screw:




I didn't make a picture of the removed TRUE again, sorry. But it worked flawlessly.


Now lets' put this monster into a case!



No, I didn't buy a new case yet. I took out the old PC and put it into the small HTPC case and am now using the stripped out Chieftech tower

I'm using black thumbscrews to tighten the mainboard, as I will be taking it out fairly often in the next few days.



Next to the practicality, they look sexy as hell!

I bought 3.5" frames for the SSD's:



You can mount two 2.5" drives into one frame, and also add an 80mm fan at the bottom. But since I'm doing a one-per-frame setup, the fans won't be needed.


Say hello to the TRUE triple UK3000 setup!




Done.











And now, the moment of truth...











It's alive!



I am happy.





I am, however, not satisfied with the temperatures it produces.



The whole point was to lower temperatures. And they are supposed to be easily 5°C lower with a lapped TRUE and an IHS-less lapped CPU.
I have concluded three possibilities for this:

a) The pressure isn't high enough
b) The neoprene is warming up
c) The TIM needs to cure.

You can decide what the reason may be. I have ordered a proper backplate for the pressurized retention mod found in the air cooling subforum.

I call this stage 1.5, as this is not what I was talking about when referring to stage 2 earlier in this build log. Stage 2 will be following this week, hopefully, and you will be surprised about it at least as much as with my suicide IHS mission.




Anyway. I shall retire for now. It is almost 10am, I have slept less than five hours in the last three nights combined and I have classes to attend to in two hours. I wish you all good riddance. And I hope you enjoyed the read so far.


This isn't done yet. Not by far.
post #84 of 246
OK a few things,
1. YOU are the bravest person ive ever met
2. MAD FUDGEING SKILLS holy crap heatspreader'less quad core?! thats new to me
3. Im pretty sure only 5 people can say they've lapped a cpu die lol
4. Rig looks REALLLLLYYY good in that case but im worried about airflow "intake"
5. Neoprine wouldent cause temps

Wow germey you deserve +rep for that HSF poping part thats just
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post #85 of 246
Nice rig you got there.
    
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post #86 of 246
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by I_dalder_I View Post
OK a few things,
1. YOU are the bravest person ive ever met
2. MAD FUDGEING SKILLS holy crap heatspreader'less quad core?! thats new to me
3. Im pretty sure only 5 people can say they've lapped a cpu die lol
4. Rig looks REALLLLLYYY good in that case but im worried about airflow "intake"
5. Neoprine wouldent cause temps

Wow germey you deserve +rep for that HSF poping part thats just
1. Thank you. I definitely felt my balls drop after doing this mod.
2. It's nothing new. People are even popping i7's for months now.
3. Sanded, yes. Lapped... not so sure
4. The case is staying open. I may have to do some household mods to add more fans though. maxing at 75°C isn't fun.
5. Are you 100% positive of that? I mean it's right at the die an all...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Choggs396 View Post
Nice rig you got there.
Thank you kind sir
post #87 of 246
that is insane! REP for you!
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post #88 of 246
Insane work with the delid, that takes some big hairy balls!

As for TRUE lapping, when I lapped for a customer on here, it took 3 sheets of 240 grit, 2 of 400 and 2 600 grit to get all the black and then the nickel off. It was a real PITA but looked great and was perfectly flat in the end.
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post #89 of 246
Ray, you have gone mad! haha.

Kudos on growing a massive pair.
 
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post #90 of 246
pretty crazy man.

I wouldn't do that. Ever. I don't haz teh balz.
props and rep.
    
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