Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Hard Drives & Storage › SSD › How to get your Kingston 40GB SSD to support TRIM
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How to get your Kingston 40GB SSD to support TRIM - Page 15

post #141 of 285
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BinaryDemon View Post
I finally got around to doing this. I was a little worried since my C: is an actual Intel 80gb X-25 G2 SSD that the hacked updater might get confused but everything worked fine.

Now my GAME SSD is rocking TRIM as well!


Good job guys.
Wahey that's great dude. You took a risk but it seemed it has paid off !

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcy View Post
Hello,

I got a huge problem and hope you can help.

After changing the HPA size in HDAT2 V453 to make the restore work on my Gigabyte X48-DQ6 my Kingston is now recognized with just 5.67GB. I tried to set back the original 40GB setting and also to "restore" but I always get an aborted message.

The SSD is still working normal but just has 5,67GB. Would be great if you could me tell how I can reset my drive to get back the full capacity.

EDIT

I was able to restore and change the HPA settings of my Kingston on my sisters computer which has an ASUS mobo inside. HDAT2 doesn´t seem to work proper on Gigabyte boards.

Thanks, great job guys.
Nice one. Yeah the Gigabyte Motherboards seem to take a disliking towards the HDAT2 utility. I am no coder so I am not sure why that is. Hopefully a revised version will be released.
post #142 of 285
Just for information, I was able to get HDAT2 to restore the factory default settings on my SSDNOW 40gb. CrystalDiskInfo confirmed that TRIM was enabled on the drive. Since I am currently running Windows XP SP2, I did the Intel Toolbox hack to use the optimize function. At first, the toolbox did not seem to work, but after I attempted to flash the SSD firmware with the patched Intel updater, the toolbox launched and I was able to perform a TRIM. The TRIM operation took only a few seconds, and HDTach confirmed full performance restored.

Note that the patched Intel Updater misidentified my WD Scorpio Blue 640gb laptop drive as an SSD (installed in my desktop along with 3 more sata hard drives), and did not find my Kingston SSDNOW. So, I am still running the original Kingston firmware, but TRIM appears to be fully enabled.

Nice job and thanks to Telnet and all who assisted.
post #143 of 285
Thread Starter 
Glad you got it working. Once you get onto Win7 the Auto TRIM is so useful. No real need to run the Intel Toolbox too often. Oh and welcome to OCN.
post #144 of 285
Hi everyone!
I tried to get myKingston 40GB SSD to support TRIM, but I've encountered an issue.
I've got motherboard GIGABYTE GA-H55M-S2H.
I've successfully updated the SSD Firmware to 2CV102HD. Then I tried to use HDAT2 but it used to hang when performing "Detect BIOS INT13h devices". However, the HDAT2DEM is able to detect my SSD and list it. And I stuck at this point. It said than it can't "Restore" due to the HPA. So I went to both Hidden Areas Test and the SET MAX HPA menu and tried to disable HPA. But it is throwing an error. I can't disable HPA and can't restore settings. CrystalDiskInfo shows that TRIM is not supported.
What can you suggest to me? Right now I have no oportunity to plug my SSD to another PC, so I have to resolve that problem using my current hardware.
Any help will be very appreciated.

PS sorry for my terrible english )
post #145 of 285
Signed up just to share my experience and thank Telnet and ENTERPRISE for putting all this together, you guys rock along with everybody else who did this before me to prove it works! I noticed this guide yesterday after reading Anand's latest SSD article where he links it directly (http://www.anandtech.com/storage/sho...spx?i=3747&p=7) and promptly dropped my work to read up. Don't tell my boss!

I'll start off by saying I have a Gigabyte GA-EP35-DS4 and was concerned by Marcy's report of HDAT2 mangling his drive on an X48-DQ6. I don't readily have access to anything else with SATA support so I chose to go the Live CD/hdparm route (as per Spacedust's instructions). Having never actually used Linux outside of an SSH connection into some game servers I can assure anybody that's comfortable with a terminal window that it's rather straightforward.

Before I did anything, I didn't want to lose my current Windows install so I backed up an image using Clonezilla. I'd recommend this, it's simple and quick and can save you a headache later if something goes wrong.

Then, using the HP Format utility I put the modified iSSDFUT.exe file on a USB drive. This was something I've done before for BIOS updates and was no problem, the directions in the OP are spot on along with the provided links. I unplugged all other hard drives in my system (leaving them connected confused the updater for some reason) and the firmware installed just fine even with AHCI enabled. Went back into Windows to make sure everything was still there and confirm the update, it installed "New hardware" and asked for a reboot so I knew things were looking up.

Next I booted off the CentOS 5.4 Live CD (had to use the i386 edition even though my computer is x64) and installed the newest hdparm as described. This is where I started to run into issues, but some tinkering eventually got it to go.

The first problem I ran across was that hdparm's -I and --dco-identify commands (to verify my controller was recognized and I had the correct drive) were failing with an I/O error. This was resolved by disabling AHCI and SATA Native Mode in my BIOS.

The next problem was that --dco-restore was failing with a similar error, which turned out to be the same HPA problem mentioned here. hdparm -N was telling me that the sectors were at 78122887 available out of 78125000 total, so I did hdparm -N78125000 to temporarily free them up and disable HPA. After this I was able to --dco-restore successfully. I tried --dco-identify once more to see if it would list DSM under SATA Feature Sets in addition to NCQ and SSP, but no dice; maybe a bug in hdparm? Rebooting my computer restored the previous HPA settings, -Np would make the change permanent but it's only 1MB and I didn't want to risk it.

I then changed everything in my BIOS back to how it should be for Windows, and it booted right up. The difference is insane and I made sure to run benches before and after to confirm the results and demonstrate the benefits.

Here's Crystal Disk Info before I did anything, then after updating the firmware, and finally after enabling TRIM:



Notice that my drive has had hundreds of gigs of writes, without TRIM it was getting pretty sad. I further confirmed TRIM support was enabled with the Intel SSD Toolbox at Word 169 Bit 0 which was now set to 1, as well as with fsutil which told me that DisableDeleteNotify was 0.

Here's Crystal Disk Mark and AS SSD Benchmark before any changes, and after running an Optimizer pass in the modified Intel SSD Toolbox (which took all of 30 seconds):





Look at the increases! Even degraded it was leagues ahead of a mechanical drive, but fixing it up regained my speeds as they were the day I bought it. All without losing any data.

I really don't know what to say, the information on this forum was invaluable. I knew someone would eventually come up with a way to enable TRIM on these drives after Kingston abandoned us and I'm thrilled it was sooner rather than later.

I hope what I've written helps other people to try this for themselves (I've already convinced a friend), it was a scary proposition for me but in the end turned out to be nothing but time well spent. Maybe if this workaround gets enough attention Intel will cave to allow a proper and tested-safe update.
post #146 of 285
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsoft View Post
Hi everyone!
I tried to get myKingston 40GB SSD to support TRIM, but I've encountered an issue.
I've got motherboard GIGABYTE GA-H55M-S2H.
I've successfully updated the SSD Firmware to 2CV102HD. Then I tried to use HDAT2 but it used to hang when performing "Detect BIOS INT13h devices". However, the HDAT2DEM is able to detect my SSD and list it. And I stuck at this point. It said than it can't "Restore" due to the HPA. So I went to both Hidden Areas Test and the SET MAX HPA menu and tried to disable HPA. But it is throwing an error. I can't disable HPA and can't restore settings. CrystalDiskInfo shows that TRIM is not supported.
What can you suggest to me? Right now I have no oportunity to plug my SSD to another PC, so I have to resolve that problem using my current hardware.
Any help will be very appreciated.

PS sorry for my terrible english )
Hmm I am not totally sure on that one. I never ran into any issues. As such I cannot really advise you on what to do other than try the drive in another PC or another SATA port on your motherboard. Failing that make sure you are not running in AHCI mode.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hotdog Storm View Post
Signed up just to share my experience and thank Telnet and ENTERPRISE for putting all this together, you guys rock along with everybody else who did this before me to prove it works! I noticed this guide yesterday after reading Anand's latest SSD article where he links it directly (http://www.anandtech.com/storage/sho...spx?i=3747&p=7) and promptly dropped my work to read up. Don't tell my boss!

I'll start off by saying I have a Gigabyte GA-EP35-DS4 and was concerned by Marcy's report of HDAT2 mangling his drive on an X48-DQ6. I don't readily have access to anything else with SATA support so I chose to go the Live CD/hdparm route (as per Spacedust's instructions). Having never actually used Linux outside of an SSH connection into some game servers I can assure anybody that's comfortable with a terminal window that it's rather straightforward.

Before I did anything, I didn't want to lose my current Windows install so I backed up an image using Clonezilla. I'd recommend this, it's simple and quick and can save you a headache later if something goes wrong.

Then, using the HP Format utility I put the modified iSSDFUT.exe file on a USB drive. This was something I've done before for BIOS updates and was no problem, the directions in the OP are spot on along with the provided links. I unplugged all other hard drives in my system (leaving them connected confused the updater for some reason) and the firmware installed just fine even with AHCI enabled. Went back into Windows to make sure everything was still there and confirm the update, it installed "New hardware" and asked for a reboot so I knew things were looking up.

Next I booted off the CentOS 5.4 Live CD (had to use the i386 edition even though my computer is x64) and installed the newest hdparm as described. This is where I started to run into issues, but some tinkering eventually got it to go.

The first problem I ran across was that hdparm's -I and --dco-identify commands (to verify my controller was recognized and I had the correct drive) were failing with an I/O error. This was resolved by disabling AHCI and SATA Native Mode in my BIOS.

The next problem was that --dco-restore was failing with a similar error, which turned out to be the same HPA problem mentioned here. hdparm -N was telling me that the sectors were at 78122887 available out of 78125000 total, so I did hdparm -N78125000 to temporarily free them up and disable HPA. After this I was able to --dco-restore successfully. I tried --dco-identify once more to see if it would list DSM under SATA Feature Sets in addition to NCQ and SSP, but no dice; maybe a bug in hdparm? Rebooting my computer restored the previous HPA settings, -Np would make the change permanent but it's only 1MB and I didn't want to risk it.

I then changed everything in my BIOS back to how it should be for Windows, and it booted right up. The difference is insane and I made sure to run benches before and after to confirm the results and demonstrate the benefits.

Here's Crystal Disk Info before I did anything, then after updating the firmware, and finally after enabling TRIM:



Notice that my drive has had hundreds of gigs of writes, without TRIM it was getting pretty sad. I further confirmed TRIM support was enabled with the Intel SSD Toolbox at Word 169 Bit 0 which was now set to 1, as well as with fsutil which told me that DisableDeleteNotify was 0.

Here's Crystal Disk Mark and AS SSD Benchmark before any changes, and after running an Optimizer pass in the modified Intel SSD Toolbox (which took all of 30 seconds):





Look at the increases! Even degraded it was leagues ahead of a mechanical drive, but fixing it up regained my speeds as they were the day I bought it. All without losing any data.

I really don't know what to say, the information on this forum was invaluable. I knew someone would eventually come up with a way to enable TRIM on these drives after Kingston abandoned us and I'm thrilled it was sooner rather than later.

I hope what I've written helps other people to try this for themselves (I've already convinced a friend), it was a scary proposition for me but in the end turned out to be nothing but time well spent. Maybe if this workaround gets enough attention Intel will cave to allow a proper and tested-safe update.
Thanks very much for joining up to share your experiences mate. I am sure they will be of great value to others visiting this guide. I have added your post to the testimony post. Glad you were able to get everything working.

Cheers again
post #147 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsoft View Post
Hi everyone!
I tried to get myKingston 40GB SSD to support TRIM, but I've encountered an issue.
I've got motherboard GIGABYTE GA-H55M-S2H.
I've successfully updated the SSD Firmware to 2CV102HD. Then I tried to use HDAT2 but it used to hang when performing "Detect BIOS INT13h devices". However, the HDAT2DEM is able to detect my SSD and list it. And I stuck at this point. It said than it can't "Restore" due to the HPA. So I went to both Hidden Areas Test and the SET MAX HPA menu and tried to disable HPA. But it is throwing an error. I can't disable HPA and can't restore settings. CrystalDiskInfo shows that TRIM is not supported.
What can you suggest to me? Right now I have no oportunity to plug my SSD to another PC, so I have to resolve that problem using my current hardware.
Any help will be very appreciated.

PS sorry for my terrible english )

Hi Philsoft,

the problems you describe are exactly the same as I had on my Gigabyte X48-DQ6. Therefore be carefull when playing around with the HPA settings. The only safe method making sure it´ll work without any glitches is doing the restore on different computer. The only thing it needs to have is a SATA port.

@Hotdog Storm

Thanks for sharing! Is your PC running as a server? 1881h but just 39 power on counts. I think mine is the other extreme - 765h 309 power on counts.

Regards Marcy
post #148 of 285
I just never turn it off, and if you'll notice 6 of those cycles were doing this mod I guess soft restarts don't count towards that number (otherwise it would be a couple dozen extra), only actual power off events.

philsoft, you might try the route I went with a Linux Live CD if the problem truly lies with HDAT2.
post #149 of 285
I can confirm that "pre-production firmware" error is MB problem. When I move to ASUS P4P800, everything is perfect.
post #150 of 285
I just signed up to say thanks for this guide. I have a Gigabyte mobo (p55-ud4p) and I could not restore by using HDAT 2.

I ended up following what spacedust and Hotdog Storm did through linux and it worked out just fine!

So once again thank you Telnet, ENTERPRISE, spacedust, and Hotdog Storm!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: SSD
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Hard Drives & Storage › SSD › How to get your Kingston 40GB SSD to support TRIM