Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Water Cooling › Data On Coolant Flow Path Versus Temperature?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Data On Coolant Flow Path Versus Temperature? - Page 2

post #11 of 14
I asked the same question before plumbing my rig and the consensus was the res always feeds the pump and the component (s) to be cooled generally follow the rad (res, pump, rad, cpu).

When taking the heatsoak involved with overall quantity of coolant, the smallest amount that will do the job seems ideal. My res has a lot of surface area per volume and I believe that helps dissipate some of the heat-soak. But eliminating the res altogether would probably be best.

When attempting to cool more than one component using splitters assures the lowest temps to all components equally. Similar to the resistance in an electrical line--running in parallel keeps pressure and temp in their ideal zone.

As mentioned above these differences are slight. The most effect is likely to be the waterblock design--they are certainly not created equal and a superior waterblock still needs to have the right flow of coolant (as in gps, hoese I.D. elbow restrictions, etc). A great deal of technical data regarding the development of some superior waterblocks has been posted up at ProCooling Forums by "Cathar" Stew Forster of Little River Waterblocks.

What it boils down to is small I.D. lines with "weak" aquarium (Elheim type) pumps have a completely different flow characteristic than large I. D. lines with a powerful impeller pump. Cooling loop tests using sensitive temp probes, flowmeters and standardized test beds showed that some waterblocks worked much better with the small lines and others with large lines.

Line Diameter, Pump Head and GPS, are difinitely something to consider when choosing the water block (s). Cooling a SLI set up is going to involve somewhat more plumbing and therefore more restrictions--basically optimizing your loop by planning the build in detail is the way to go--long lines, lots of elbows, different size lines are something to avoid.

How fast the coolant moves through the system is another factor that really makes a difference. THe Swiftech Storm Extreme Universal Waterblock seems to have the widest range of effective cooling no matter the flow characterisitcs.

Obviously the type of rad, fan and/or radbox is a key element--using dissimilar metals in a loop (aluminum rad, copper wateblock) creates electolysis and the use of deionized water as well as antifreeze or some proprietary PC product is mandatory. Within moments the waterblock will grow a patina and be far less abe to shed heat to the coolant stream. Use antifreeze or some sort of corrosion inhibiting product.

Forcing air past the heat-exchanger (or rad) is another area to explore for maximum effect (per Db)--there is something to be said for a remote rad box despite the extra hose as it gets a primary source of noise away from the PC (and the PC user...)

Hope that gives you something to chew on...
Shop Dog
(13 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E8400 Asus Blitz Formula SE HD3870X2 G Skill 2 x 2GB DDR2 800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Velociraptor 150GB LG DVD Burner Vista Ultimate 64 AOC 21.5" LED 1080p 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Deck Legend Silverstone 750 Modular OverClock Edition Lian Li V1100 Logitech Trackball 
Mouse Pad
Nope 
  hide details  
Reply
Shop Dog
(13 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
E8400 Asus Blitz Formula SE HD3870X2 G Skill 2 x 2GB DDR2 800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Velociraptor 150GB LG DVD Burner Vista Ultimate 64 AOC 21.5" LED 1080p 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Deck Legend Silverstone 750 Modular OverClock Edition Lian Li V1100 Logitech Trackball 
Mouse Pad
Nope 
  hide details  
Reply
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDeville
Hey Outlaw,

Very helpful, thanks. Those are relatively big changes. Can you clarify what the "before" and "now" cases are? Different water flow path? Or air cooling versus water cooling?

Gracias
Sorry, it would be Air vs water.
Will edit
My BFG
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core 2 Duo E6600 EVGA 680i SLI NF68 2 X 8800GTS 640MB in SLI G.Skill PC6400 DDR2 800Mhz 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
250g SATA2 16Mb Windows XP home 20.1 Wide Screen Saitek Eclipse 
PowerCaseMouse
OCZ GamerXtream 700W Thermaltake Armor MS Optical 
  hide details  
Reply
My BFG
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core 2 Duo E6600 EVGA 680i SLI NF68 2 X 8800GTS 640MB in SLI G.Skill PC6400 DDR2 800Mhz 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
250g SATA2 16Mb Windows XP home 20.1 Wide Screen Saitek Eclipse 
PowerCaseMouse
OCZ GamerXtream 700W Thermaltake Armor MS Optical 
  hide details  
Reply
post #13 of 14
I have always gone res,pump,rad,cpu,gpu and it works for me. I'm getting load of 34 and idle of 20 - 22.
MainframeIII
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
3930K Asus P9X79 Deluxe Asus R9 290X 16GB G-Skill 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
2x240GB Crucial SSD Raid 0 Lg DVD W7 64bit Benq 24" FP241W & 23" FP231W 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
G15 PC P&C Silencer 750 Thermaltake Armor Modded Rat 9 
Audio
Asus Xonar Essence STX 
  hide details  
Reply
MainframeIII
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
3930K Asus P9X79 Deluxe Asus R9 290X 16GB G-Skill 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
2x240GB Crucial SSD Raid 0 Lg DVD W7 64bit Benq 24" FP241W & 23" FP231W 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
G15 PC P&C Silencer 750 Thermaltake Armor Modded Rat 9 
Audio
Asus Xonar Essence STX 
  hide details  
Reply
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun
After that, the water goes to the reservoir, so that the pump can get air free water.
Ah ha!!

You've finally answered the nagging question of why the tank goes before the pump. Gracias!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberDruid
Hope that gives you something to chew on...
Yes you have--I hope I don't make you regret it.

Now for my litany of comments/questions.

First off, I really liked your comments and insights on the importance of matched components. I've seen the same thing in other dynamic systems--a well-designed network of indifferent components always offers more bang for the buck & effort than a random collection of excellent parts.

That's not to say that tweaking/experimenting/uniqueness aren't fun in themselves, but right now I'm in the mood to stand on the shoulders of giants, rather than climb the whole frickin' mountain myself.

So your comments about matching components to flow rates, and balancing flows made mucho sense to me. Thanks.

By heatsoak, do you mean heat leaking from an internal reservoir (which I'll have), and heating up the case? That's why I puzzled at storing hot water in the reservoir, until I realized it is better than putting lots of pressure on the reservoir, or risking bubbles in the pump. I'm assuming that if the reservoir were external, the bigger the better (swimming pool being ideal)?

Your suggestion of parallelling my CPU and GPU waterblocks also appeals. Thinking about your flow comments, it seems to me that a gradual splitter (e.g. y-shaped) might be less restrictive than a abrupt one (e.g. t-shaped). Is this true? Can anyone recommend a good source for splitters for my ThermalTake BigWater's skinny tubing (6.5mm/0.25" ID)?

A remote rad box also sounds good, but for now I'd like to see if an internal design is good enough and, if not, upgrade later.

Thanks to all for your friendly and helpful comments. You've made this newbie feel welcome.

Stay cool (owtch).
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardOSMonitor
Athlon 64 X2 4200+ Asus 8N-SLI Premium Windows XP Pro Dual Dell 19" LCD 
PowerCase
Seasonic S12-600 (quiet) Antec P180 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardOSMonitor
Athlon 64 X2 4200+ Asus 8N-SLI Premium Windows XP Pro Dual Dell 19" LCD 
PowerCase
Seasonic S12-600 (quiet) Antec P180 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Water Cooling
Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Water Cooling › Data On Coolant Flow Path Versus Temperature?