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post #961 of 3773
Quote:
Originally Posted by shajbot View Post
Wow the PCIE version of 1950Pro is really really cheap. I was looking at the AGP version and it's ~$250 (vs $170 PCIE)...
Hi shajbot,

I just noticed that you have not placed hvac on your sig as part of our team. You might want to consider it...

As for the cards. Yeah, all of the PCIE cards are cheaper than their AGP counterparts. I guess the move to PCIE is really underway.

Take care, :-)
post #962 of 3773
just ordered the parts, rush order put on there so should ship it out tomorow and be here by saturday i hope if not then monday
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post #963 of 3773
Quote:
Originally Posted by shajbot View Post
What kind of chip you're purchasing? Prescott, Northwood?

First you just need to dissemble the hsf. But before you pull the actual heatsink off, twist the heatsink a bit so the connection between the cpu and the heatsink (usually as5) will break and the heatsink will come easier. Then lift the lock-arm on the side of the socket and just pop the cpu out. If you don't twist then it'd still be fine but might stuck the cpu up and out of the socket before lifting the lock-arm which might do damage to the pin and stuff, which could render your old cpu broken and can't sell for $$.

See my gallery if you don't recall the socket interface and which way you should put your cpu in.

It didn`t actually say which type it was, but the "N" at the last part of the number indicated that it is a Northwood. Hey thanks for your info.
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post #964 of 3773
Quote:
Originally Posted by 455buick View Post
Hi hvac,

shajbot is right. Did you assemble the computer or did someone else?? If you did and you used Arctic Silver 2,3 or 5 then no worries. If someone else did or the thermal pad on the stock heatsink was used, then be very careful removing the heatsink. I've had stock thermal pads adhere themselves so well, that removing the heatsink, also removed the cpu.

I was able to re-straighten the pins and re-use the cpu but being very careful is the word of the day. As shajbot noted, trying to twist the heatsink a little might help break the seal the heatsink has to the cpu. Just be careful on the twisting as well. You wouldn't want to twist the heatsink off and remove the cpu in the same motion. If you know what I mean...

Take care and I hope this helped, :-)
Hey 455,

I built this rig originally and installed the existing chip. I used the paste that came with it, but at the time I was a real noob and that was my first build (and only one so far), so I didn`t even know to pay attention to what kind of paste that was. Can I assume that it is AS 5? What did Intel put in their packaging 3 years ago? This was a retail box with the heatsink and fan along with the 3 year factory warranty. All of the parts in this rig were built from brand new then, and I bought them from Newegg.
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post #965 of 3773
Quote:
Originally Posted by hvacgaspiping View Post
Hey 455,

I built this rig originally and installed the existing chip. I used the paste that came with it, but at the time I was a real noob and that was my first build (and only one so far), so I didn`t even know to pay attention to what kind of paste that was. Can I assume that it is AS 5? What did Intel put in their packaging 3 years ago? This was a retail box with the heatsink and fan along with the 3 year factory warranty. All of the parts in this rig were built from brand new then, and I bought them from Newegg.
Hi hvac,

Usually the paste or pad on the stock heatsink was not AS5. Just a common thermal pad, so end users could put their new heatsink/cpu together real easy. No problems. I've use the thermal pads myself. However, once the heatsink/cpu setup gets used and heated up they are usually very hard to seperate. Not that it can't be done, just be patient and very careful.

I would make these suggestions. It may take a little longer but will be easier in the long run.

1) Make sure you ground yourself continually during this process of working on your computer. You don't want ESD to render your expensive parts useless.

2) Prepare your motherboard to be removed from the case with heatsink and cpu still on it. It means un-plugging everything and clearing stuff out of the way and removing all pci cards as well.

3) Place the motherboard on a flat non-conductive surface. I've used wood and cardboard in the past. Anything that is flat and will support the motherboard as you press down on it to remove and install the heatsink.

4) On the stock P4 heatsink, press down on the two thumb clips together and un-hook the hold downs.

5) Now the fun stuff. Gently try and twist the heatsink right and then left. Be very attentive to the cpu in the socket. Hopefully you'll see a slight movement of the heatsink (one way or the other). This means you've broken the adhesion the thermal pad has on the cpu. Once that is accomplished, lift gently up and the heatsink should come free of the cpu.

6) You will know within seconds if it worked. If not, the cpu will still be attached to the heatsink. If it is carefully examine the pins, all 478 of them. If it came off with the heatsink some of them may be bent. I've never seen any broken off, but maybe I've been lucky as well.
6a) If some of the pins are bent, don't panic. I've used a thin bladed knife in the past to slide down between those that are bent and gently re-straighten them. All of the pins must align in all four directions as you look down through the rows. Make adjustments as you see fit.

7) If the old cpu is still on the motherboard (that's good news), lift the lever and remove it.

8) Place the new cpu in the socket. However, if the old cpu does have bent pins, before you place the new cpu into the socket, place the old one in. It should go in with zero force! Just drop it in. If it does not, then continue to play with the pins until they are straight.

9) As for the heatsink. I use an old plastic credit card to scrape off the residual thermal pad material from the bottom of it. It won't scratch the surface and will remove most of the sticky stuff.
9a) After the scraping, use rubbing alcohol to remove the rest of the residual thermal pad material. I also use a lint free material. I've had success with the newer types of tough paper towels. Use a lot of them and get the surface of the heat sink as clean as possible.

10) Re-apply the AS5 on the cpu and heatsink as directed by the Arctic Silver's web page.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/appi...ecore_wcap.pdf

11) Install the motherboard and computer components in reverse order that you took them out. It might also be a good time to clean out the case. if you haven't done that in awhile.

Set everything up and re-start the computer. With no other changes, Windows XP should restart and on the BIOS flash screen you should see the new cpu displayed.

Generally speaking, Windows XP does not care about adding or changing out cpu's, video cards, ram, etc... It's the motherboard that XP cares about. Change that and the HAL (hardware abstract layer) will change and Windows XP will think it's in a "new" computer and ask for revalidation with Microsoft. The dreaded WPA activation process will ensue.

Just take your time, pay attention to detail, put things back the way they were in the computer, and most of all ground yourself! It should be an easy swap out....

I hope this helped, :-)
post #966 of 3773
Quote:
Originally Posted by 455buick View Post
Hi hvac,

Usually the paste or pad on the stock heatsink was not AS5. Just a common thermal pad, so end users could put their new heatsink/cpu together real easy. No problems. I've use the thermal pads myself. However, once the heatsink/cpu setup gets used and heated up they are usually very hard to seperate. Not that it can't be done, just be patient and very careful.

I would make these suggestions. It may take a little longer but will be easier in the long run.

1) Make sure you ground yourself continually during this process of working on your computer. You don't want ESD to render your expensive parts useless.

2) Prepare your motherboard to be removed from the case with heatsink and cpu still on it. It means un-plugging everything and clearing stuff out of the way and removing all pci cards as well.

3) Place the motherboard on a flat non-conductive surface. I've used wood and cardboard in the past. Anything that is flat and will support the motherboard as you press down on it to remove and install the heatsink.

4) On the stock P4 heatsink, press down on the two thumb clips together and un-hook the hold downs.

5) Now the fun stuff. Gently try and twist the heatsink right and then left. Be very attentive to the cpu in the socket. Hopefully you'll see a slight movement of the heatsink (one way or the other). This means you've broken the adhesion the thermal pad has on the cpu. Once that is accomplished, lift gently up and the heatsink should come free of the cpu.

6) You will know within seconds if it worked. If not, the cpu will still be attached to the heatsink. If it is carefully examine the pins, all 478 of them. If it came off with the heatsink some of them may be bent. I've never seen any broken off, but maybe I've been lucky as well.
6a) If some of the pins are bent, don't panic. I've used a thin bladed knife in the past to slide down between those that are bent and gently re-straighten them. All of the pins must align in all four directions as you look down through the rows. Make adjustments as you see fit.

7) If the old cpu is still on the motherboard (that's good news), lift the lever and remove it.

8) Place the new cpu in the socket. However, if the old cpu does have bent pins, before you place the new cpu into the socket, place the old one in. It should go in with zero force! Just drop it in. If it does not, then continue to play with the pins until they are straight.

9) As for the heatsink. I use an old plastic credit card to scrape off the residual thermal pad material from the bottom of it. It won't scratch the surface and will remove most of the sticky stuff.
9a) After the scraping, use rubbing alcohol to remove the rest of the residual thermal pad material. I also use a lint free material. I've had success with the newer types of tough paper towels. Use a lot of them and get the surface of the heat sink as clean as possible.

10) Re-apply the AS5 on the cpu and heatsink as directed by the Arctic Silver's web page.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/appi...ecore_wcap.pdf

11) Install the motherboard and computer components in reverse order that you took them out. It might also be a good time to clean out the case. if you haven't done that in awhile.

Set everything up and re-start the computer. With no other changes, Windows XP should restart and on the BIOS flash screen you should see the new cpu displayed.

Generally speaking, Windows XP does not care about adding or changing out cpu's, video cards, ram, etc... It's the motherboard that XP cares about. Change that and the HAL (hardware abstract layer) will change and Windows XP will think it's in a "new" computer and ask for revalidation with Microsoft. The dreaded WPA activation process will ensue.

Just take your time, pay attention to detail, put things back the way they were in the computer, and most of all ground yourself! It should be an easy swap out....

I hope this helped, :-)
Hey 455,

Yeah, this helped a bunch! The only question I have is, as a last resort can you CAREFULLY use a razor knife or xacto blade to help unseat the heatsink from the CPU? I wouldn`t do this unless I was having trouble getting it loose. The other thing is I have a wireless ESD strap which I`ve used in doing work around the MOBO. So far, I`ve not had any problems with static in that regard. Yet, I still wonder if this strap will continue to do its job. Any thoughts on that? I also have some 400 and 600 grit sandpaper. Is this what I should use to lap the new chip and heatsink, or should I use some finer grit? When I take everything out, I`m going to dremel out the holes in the back of the case which have served as a makeshift grille and put a wire fanguard on it. That should help with air restriction. I`ll use my glass desktop with a piece of cardboard (keep from scratching the glass) during the unseating process. Rep for you on these great tips.
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post #967 of 3773
Quote:
Originally Posted by hvacgaspiping View Post
Hey 455,

Yeah, this helped a bunch! The only question I have is, as a last resort can you CAREFULLY use a razor knife or xacto blade to help unseat the heatsink from the CPU? I wouldn`t do this unless I was having trouble getting it loose. The other thing is I have a wireless ESD strap which I`ve used in doing work around the MOBO. So far, I`ve not had any problems with static in that regard. Yet, I still wonder if this strap will continue to do its job. Any thoughts on that? I also have some 400 and 600 grit sandpaper. Is this what I should use to lap the new chip and heatsink, or should I use some finer grit? When I take everything out, I`m going to dremel out the holes in the back of the case which have served as a makeshift grille and put a wire fanguard on it. That should help with air restriction. I`ll use my glass desktop with a piece of cardboard (keep from scratching the glass) during the unseating process. Rep for you on these great tips.
Hi hvac,

I suppose if you can get the razor blade in enough it would help. You don't want to do two things: 1) Scratch the surface of either the cpu or the heatsink and 2) don't use the razor knife to pry with. It won't make it and most likely will break.

As far as lapping goes. You'll want to use the finest grit you can find. I've never lapped any of my heatsinks and reviews on the web give mixed results. I think applying the AS5 properly will have a better effect. Remember the old addage, more is not better when it comes to thermal compound use. All the thermal compound is suppose to do, is fill in the microscopic gaps on the cpu and heatsink that are there naturally from the machining process. You'll notice that some new heatsinks are not that polished to begin with.

As for the ESD strap. I've used them, but they do get in the way. ESD is also a function of humidity in the house. If the furnace heater has been running a lot, it tends to dry out the household air more. That in turn allows more Static Electricity. I'd just use common sense, and touch metal or ground your yourself often during the work on the computer.

As for the dremel. That would be a good idea as well... You can never have too much airflow through a case.

My lapping experience is with hydraulic shoes and plates and getting them within two light bands. We/I did this with a very fine lapping compound on a glass plate that was very flat. We measured the flatness with a special light and optical glass.

I hope this helped, :-)

BTW - Thanks for the rep+ You shouldn't have!
post #968 of 3773
Quote:
Originally Posted by cappy View Post
just ordered the parts, rush order put on there so should ship it out tomorow and be here by saturday i hope if not then monday
Hi cappy, shajbot and hvac! You too LBN and peroxide if your out there!

I changed my avatar! What do you think? I did this little automation a long time ago (7 years?) with a program from my old work. I can't even remember how I did it now. I think a guy at work had the button for some of our computer mod graphics that he was doing. He also had a program that would animate pictures for those same mods. Man I'm getting old. I just ran across it when looking for some other data on my hard drive.

As for the SMP folding the 2nd WU finished this morning, but the points are not showing up on my sig - 455buick. I wonder what I'm doing wrong?? I have a p2605 WU now. 1746 points worth! It will finish early Sunday. I don't want to loose that one!

Take care,
post #969 of 3773
Here buick, I made you new avatar, hope you like it. And hope you get the SMP pts thing sort out too so your credit won't get lost.



Stock image by =Shika
Of A Down Redux
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Of A Down Redux
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post #970 of 3773
Quote:
Originally Posted by shajbot View Post
Here buick, I made you new avatar, hope you like it. And hope you get the SMP pts thing sort out too so your credit won't get lost.



Stock image by =Shika
Hi shajbot,

I had my daily driver 70 Buick in my avatar for a couple of days, but nobody seemed to like it, so I removed it. That picture you have is more of a 70 Buick LeSabre which was the "really" big car back then for Buick...

Here's a front view of my car in the avatar.

Take Care and Thanks for the pic! :-)
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