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Would a hard drive limit my overclock?

post #1 of 7
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well i dunno wat kinda H.D.D cuz iam kinda confused of RAID and SAtA i got no idea wata hell r they . Oh well would my 4 years old hard drive limit my overclock?
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yeah yeah...
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post #2 of 7
most likely no
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post #3 of 7
RAID is when you have more than one hard drive working as one.
eg. 2 40gb hard drives setup in a RAID to form 1 80gb hard drive.

SATA stands for Serial ATA. Same general idea as ATA (IDE Cables), just they are faster and a somewhat different design.

And yeah, it really won't affect your overclocking at all, the only thing that could happen, is just it takes a bit of time to load maps in games and stuff. Won't actually affect the overclock though.
    
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post #4 of 7
RAID stands for Redundant Arrarys of Independent Disks, and it is when you use more than one hard drive together. The two most common RAID setups are RAID 0 and RAID 1.

RAID 0, also known as data striping, makes two hard drives work together as one. This configuration is normally used by gamers and people who want faster loading times or better hard drive benchmarks. Here is a good illustration of RAID 0:

Quote:
Originally Posted by http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/perf/raid/levels/singleLevel0-c.html
RAID 0 will give you a speed increase, that will be noticeable in Windows loading times and during game loading. But you will not notice any in-game improvements. Also, RAID 0 is not fault tolerant, meaning if one hard drive fails then everything on the other one is useless and all of your information will be lost.

RAID 1, also known as data mirroring, is another form of RAID in which the data is mirrored to each disk. So that you will have an exact copy of everything on each hard drive. RAID 1 is fault tolerant, meaning if one hard drive fails then you still have everything on the other one.


SATA, Serial-ATA, is a new form of hard drive interface which allows the hard drives to run at 150Mb/s and now even 300Mb/s. This makes the hard drives faster, and also you can finally get rid of those ribbon cables! The SATA cables are small little cables that are a lot better looking inside a case.

And the only way a hard drive would limit your overclock would be if you're SATA ports are unlocked, but you have an IDE hard drive (I think?) so that shouldn't be a problem. Also, I'm sure at least the nVidia SATA ports are locked on the Ultra-D.
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post #5 of 7
The only way it would limit your overclock is if the port/bus frequency which governs the hard drives isn't locked, so as you OC the frequency naturally goes up with it. At higher frequencies the port/bus will become unstable and in a worst case scenario corrupt the data on the hard drive.

You have a good enthusiasts motherboard designed for overclocking so you shouldn't need to worry i.e. it'll be locked (although considering the vast options you get on a DFI board it wouldn't surprise me if they gave you the option to leave the frequencies unlocked). I'm sure DFI owners here can help you clarify that.
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mauguai
The only way it would limit your overclock is if the port/bus frequency which governs the hard drives isn't locked, so as you OC the frequency naturally goes up with it. At higher frequencies the port/bus will become unstable and in a worst case scenario corrupt the data on the hard drive.

You have a good enthusiasts motherboard designed for overclocking so you shouldn't need to worry i.e. it'll be locked (although considering the vast options you get on a DFI board it wouldn't surprise me if they gave you the option to leave the frequencies unlocked). I'm sure DFI owners here can help you clarify that.
omg iam confused lol sorrry cud u please explain a lil bit more!! thank u.
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post #7 of 7
When you overclock you normally raise your FSB.
By raising your FSB you increase you AGP or PCI-E and PCI frequencies. You want to leave these at their default values which are respectively 33.3Mhz for PCI, 66.6Mhz for AGP and 100Mhz PCI-E.

By locking the AGP/PCI you also lock the SATA bus.
On most mobos SATA ports 1 and 2 are normally locked while 3 and 4 are unlocked (but don't take my word for it).
So, for the other unlocked SATA ports it's a question of whether the SATA controller gets its timing from the PCI bus (which you can lock, so that's ok) or from the FSB (which you are ramping up, so that's a problem).

Unfortunately, if you attempt to overclock and the SATA ports are unlocked it may result in data corruption. Most of the time, if you don't go too far, you can just format your drive again or re-install the ghosted copy and everything will be fine. If you go too far out of spec, then permanent damage is possible.
Anything that is tied to the bus running out of spec can get damaged. Network cards (including onboard), sound cards (including onboard audio), video cards (including onboard), hard drives, optical drives, etc...
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