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Safe temps for 478 cele d - Page 3

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThaWaxShop
ok i didnt say it was all i said in my last post was the recomended stuff, overclocking or not no difference i ran 1.6v with air and water no problems i didnt tell him to i gave MY personal experience with it. Get the bug out of your ass and grow up im REAL sick of ppl talking like they know everything on this site. Screw this place already im not gonna stay around when this place is being overrun by 13 year old know it all ass's. Peace
This is a Forum full of opinions..If you dont wish to accept what other people have to say then dont have ago at other members. Remember people have varying amounts of knowledge and detail to that knowledge.
post #22 of 25
The recommended limits for a processor manufactured by Intel on the Prescott/Prescott 2M core are as folllows (please note that these are recommendations and may not reflect on the actual limit):

Maximum recommended temperature: ~66C
Maximum recommended voltage: ~1.525v (may increase depending on cooling method/temperatures).

These limits should be followed no matter what clock speed the CPU operates on (this is arguable depending on the situation), you may have a 6GHz Pentium 4 and a 3GHz Pentium 4 still they should both be kept below 66C for best results and for safety reasons.
Going over this limit will do little harm to a degree.
Intel's TM1 Technology (Thermal Throttling) is there to attempt to cool down a processor when it reaches what it believes is the current CPU's Thermal limit. If this happens it tells you that your CPU is running to hot. This does not work without the amount of voltage applied, so you have to limit yourself on the amount you use. The motherboard will limit you also to a degree to prevent very high voltages from being used that could cause harm to both the CPU and the motherboard.

When a higher voltage is used it is always best to keep the temperature as low as you can, the TM1 state will not change however, but you should try and keep it cooler. Once the voltage hits a certain point there can be something called quantum tunelling (electron transfer to other transistors). Even with adequate cooling this can happen at high voltages, this is a good reason to keep your CPU at a decent operating temperature.

If the guidelines are met or kept below them there should be no problem

Anyone want to make a point about this post then please feel free
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Manual
Once the voltage hits a certain point there can be something called quantum tunelling (electron transfer to other transistors). Even with adequate cooling this can happen at high voltages, this is a good reason to keep your CPU at a decent operating temperature.
This is an important fact to keep in mind when overclocking as with higher voltages (even when one keeps a CPU cool) the effect of quantum tunneling (electrostatic discharge) will reduce the life of the processsor and is a good thing to inform the overclocker so that "they" can make the informed decision on their raise of voltages. I do caution using the recommended maximums as they are recommended for a processor that is not overclocked and whose voltages are not raised thus the CPU manufacturer has not taken these factors into account when delineating the maximums.

When one raises the voltages and the temperatures raise there is a concurrent raise of both idle/operating and maximum temperatures. This raise of overall temperatures and the overall effect of voltage raises should be seen as lowering the life expectancy if the voltages are raised to past maximums given for a non-overclocked processor. The newcomer to overclocking needs to be informed of this and that is what I do. When someone disapproves of this, they are in effect discounting the reactions which is fine on their machine but the newcomer should be given all information possible.

Excellent post btw...

R
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post #24 of 25
Quote:
This is an important fact to keep in mind when overclocking as with higher voltages (even when one keeps a CPU cool) the effect of quantum tunneling (electrostatic discharge) will reduce the life of the processsor and is a good thing to inform the overclocker so that "they" can make the informed decision on their raise of voltages. I do caution using the recommended maximums as they are recommended for a processor that is not overclocked and whose voltages are not raised thus the CPU manufacturer has not taken these factors into account when delineating the maximums.

When one raises the voltages and the temperatures raise there is a concurrent raise of both idle/operating and maximum temperatures. This raise of overall temperatures and the overall effect of voltage raises should be seen as lowering the life expectancy if the voltages are raised to past maximums given for a non-overclocked processor. The newcomer to overclocking needs to be informed of this and that is what I do. When someone disapproves of this, they are in effect discounting the reactions which is fine on their machine but the newcomer should be given all information possible.

Excellent post btw...

R
Good post also, I think we are getting the info accross well

Obviously when you increase the voltage even with a decent cooler the life expectancy takes a hit, even though you will usually replace the CPU before it will fail, so this is rarely noticed. This does apply to a CPU that is running at the same temperature as it was at stock manufacturers settings.

The recommended maximums we give/I give are still what Intel give, as changing the clock speed and voltages does not make a major impact in most cases, even with increased voltages I find the recommended maximum temperature suitable for most processors.
Of course if the maximum recommended voltage is breached then the maximum recommended temperature should change in conjunction with the change in the voltage over the limit.
For example if a voltage of 1.6v was used on a Pentium 4 540J I would say that you should try and keep it below ~61C instead of ~66C to make sure all is ok
post #25 of 25
Yes point well put across.
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