Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Windows › FAQ: Windows Maintenance and Tweaks: Do's and Don't's
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

FAQ: Windows Maintenance and Tweaks: Do's and Don't's - Page 3

post #21 of 32
Quote:
Have you ever noticed benefits?
On older systems, yes. So I see no reason not to do it pro-actively, rather than waiting for windows bloat (which I know is less of a problem with Vista/7) to set in.

Quote:
But the Prefetch folder in Windows 7 is self-maintaining.
Sure, in Windows 7 it is, but this thread doesn't specifically say "Windows 7 Maintenance".

Quote:
But msconfig is for diagnostic purposes only. The only people who should be using msconfig are people who completely understand what they're doing and are just as comfortable in msconfig as they are in their own home. But people who aren't 100% comfortable with it should stay out of it, or at least only follow instructions given to them without adding or removing (or modifying) any steps given to them.

So it's not that it will cause problems, but it's that people who don't know what they're doing might see a guide that recommends messing with msconfig. And then they open msconfig and see other things they can do in it. And then they go and tweak those other things thinking that they know what they're doing. And then they reboot and have problems and wonder why.
That is beyond the scope of the original point. That could be said of fiddling with any windows setting without knowing what it does.
Weedy
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 4.2Ghz @ 1.216v (load) HT off ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 Sapphire 7870 Ghz OC 6Gb Corsair TR3X6G1600C7 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
OCZ VERTEX 250Gb SSD WD Caviar Blue Hitachi 7k2000 Samsung Bluray Drive 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 8.1 Enterprise Sony KDL40D3500 40" Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Enermax Revolution 1250w 
CaseMouse
Antec 1200 Razer Mamba 
  hide details  
Reply
Weedy
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 4.2Ghz @ 1.216v (load) HT off ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 Sapphire 7870 Ghz OC 6Gb Corsair TR3X6G1600C7 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
OCZ VERTEX 250Gb SSD WD Caviar Blue Hitachi 7k2000 Samsung Bluray Drive 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 8.1 Enterprise Sony KDL40D3500 40" Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Enermax Revolution 1250w 
CaseMouse
Antec 1200 Razer Mamba 
  hide details  
Reply
post #22 of 32
Thread Starter 
http://www.edbott.com/weblog/2005/04...efetch-folder/

Quote:
Cleaning out the Prefetch folder will not improve performance. I have proved this with a stopwatch repeatedly on multiple test systems, and documented the results in Windows XP Inside Out Second Edition. In fact, emptying the Prefetch folder will actually reduce performance, because Windows has to re-create the trace files the next time you run the program. Windows cleans out old files here automatically, and it uses the current information simply as instructions to help load programs more efficiently. If you delete a program, its layout and trace files go unused and are deleted within weeks.
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randallrocks View Post
No there, its just saying buy my book. And I'll put money on his timing results in that book being the time from post until the desktop appears, not until everything has stopped loading, which is where I understand prefetch comes in to play. (loading stuff pre-emptively)
Weedy
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 4.2Ghz @ 1.216v (load) HT off ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 Sapphire 7870 Ghz OC 6Gb Corsair TR3X6G1600C7 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
OCZ VERTEX 250Gb SSD WD Caviar Blue Hitachi 7k2000 Samsung Bluray Drive 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 8.1 Enterprise Sony KDL40D3500 40" Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Enermax Revolution 1250w 
CaseMouse
Antec 1200 Razer Mamba 
  hide details  
Reply
Weedy
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 4.2Ghz @ 1.216v (load) HT off ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 Sapphire 7870 Ghz OC 6Gb Corsair TR3X6G1600C7 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
OCZ VERTEX 250Gb SSD WD Caviar Blue Hitachi 7k2000 Samsung Bluray Drive 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 8.1 Enterprise Sony KDL40D3500 40" Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Enermax Revolution 1250w 
CaseMouse
Antec 1200 Razer Mamba 
  hide details  
Reply
post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
Could you explain better this tweak? I'm curious.
Oddly enough, I was prepared to explain it. But unfortunately, I don't remember exactly what I used to do. However, here's the strange thing: I just remembered that for some reason, I no longer have to do it the way I used to do it (which was a little bit involved). I mean, I remembered that now it happens right after disabling both Home Group services in Services.msc. But I could have sworn that I achieved these same results the other way. Perhaps it has always been this way in Windows 7 and maybe I've never noticed.

So, I guess all that needs to be done is disable both services in Services.msc related to HomeGroup, and then reboot. I don't know. Or perhaps it also requires disabling UAC. Heh, maybe it's true that I've never paid close enough attention.

If that doesn't work for you (or if it can't work due to needing HomeGroup - and some people actually use it), then I might be able to show another way. Although, I suppose it's possible that it may not be worth it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
Anyway the great thing of the UAC (at least the way I see it) is that it gives you administrator privileges only when needed (temporary), why run as administrator while browsing? I'm fine with people disabling it as long as they know what they are doing (like you or _02).
Actually, I merely hope that I know what I'm doing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
Some of my friends (average Facebooks users) disabled it because it was an "annoying confirmation", they followed a "hack" video on YouTube, I think you've understood what I mean.
It is because of this people that Microsoft lowered the default level of the UAC.
I have to admit that I disabled it for the same reason, except I'm excessively cautious about everything on purpose for the safety of my computer, so I don't need UAC being paranoid. I am better than UAC, except, of course, I won't know if something bad happens behind the scenes until it's too late. But the chances of that happening to an overly-cautious person like me are hopefully very slim.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
I agree, it is surely more useful on notebooks/netbooks, but it's still useful on desktops (for the same reasons).

I admit that once in a while I must do a restart because Speedfan seems to freak out.
I remember reading an article that explained why Vista/7 were designed to always use the hibernation, unfortunately I can't remember where it was.
Why not have faster boot times? My PC benefits from it even though it's very 'clean', plus not all people have SSDs (BTW, I want one ).
I think that the advantages are noticeable...

...or maybe I'm wrong.
I'm probably overly cautious about this too. It seems to me like lately, I added one more reboot to my day: now, instead of doing it at the end of the day, and maybe once or twice during the day, I also begin the day with a reboot. I like things to be extra, extra fresh. lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
AFAIK each defragmenter has its 'logic', so for you it could be better but for me not, anyway I feel that the defragmenter of Windows 7 is fine for most users, people who have 'special needs' already know what to use.
I feel that it's good because it works better with the OS, runs in background, in fact you can totally forget about defragmenting, again this only applies for most 'normal' users.
My special needs come down to this: since I'm a DIY'er and since I'm already trying to avoid using everything that's built into Windows like Defender, Firewall, and Internet Explorer, I may as well also use a third-party defragger. But I didn't really choose Auslogics Disk Defrag for any other reason than it's really fast, does a great job, and isn't made by Microsoft. Plus, it has an automatic defragging feature than be customized in pretty fine detail, including setting up a schedule.

But if each defragger has certain logic, then I wonder how easy it would be to find out which one is best for me (err, best for my parents now that I have rebelled against hard drives).

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
I've never thought of it, it's true, funny and strange but true.
Yeah, if somebody had told me like 10 years ago that we were going to have solid state drives and that they were actually going to benefit from being fragmented, I would have laughed really hard with the assumption that I was being trolled.

It's still hard for me to use my computer every day without ever defragging my drives because it has been something I've been doing every single day since I built my sig rig. So yeah, it's hard to break a habit that I performed every single day for 2½ years!

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
I totally agree. Too many years of XP have made it difficult to accept the way Vista/7 work, look for example the enhanced search, disabling services, tweaking registry keys for faster shut downs/boots (I've done it ).
In what ways do you mean? I mean, I see that you explained the ways, but I admit that I'm still confused. I went straight from XP to 7, so I should understand. Maybe I need to go run around to get some blood to my head.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
P.S.
Am I the only one that uses the browser's built in cleaner (Firefox in my case, just press Shift+Ctrl+Canc) and the Disk Cleanup of Windows 7?
My reasoning behind this is: who else can clean better than the program who 'owns' those files? The program itself!
I don't use any cleanup! Maybe it's high time I started!

Quote:
Originally Posted by weidass View Post
On older systems, yes. So I see no reason not to do it pro-actively, rather than waiting for windows bloat (which I know is less of a problem with Vista/7) to set in.
Yeah, it was a benefit on older systems because they had such weak processing power. But with a system like ours, it would be like making a tiny change to a huge text document.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
Sure, in Windows 7 it is, but this thread doesn't specifically say "Windows 7 Maintenance".
True, but does Windows XP have a "Automatic (Delayed Start)" setting in Services.msc?

Plus, Windows 7 has officially been out for over a year now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
That is beyond the scope of the original point. That could be said of fiddling with any windows setting without knowing what it does.
That was actually where I was going with that.
Edited by TwoCables - 11/9/10 at 8:29pm
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #25 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
So, I guess all that needs to be done is disable both services in Services.msc related to HomeGroup, and then reboot. I don't know. Or perhaps it also requires disabling UAC. Heh, maybe it's true that I've never paid close enough attention.
Mmmh I've never heard of this, anyway as long as it works it's fine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
I have to admit that I disabled it for the same reason, except I'm excessively cautious about everything on purpose for the safety of my computer, so I don't need UAC being paranoid. I am better than UAC, except, of course, I won't know if something bad happens behind the scenes until it's too late. But the chances of that happening to an overly-cautious person like me are hopefully very slim.
Actually in some cases the UAC could be counterproductive. I'm just a kid using the PC mostly for gaming, so some UAC prompts are not a big deal but for another person who works on the PC it could be. It's just personal preference. If people remembered this there would be less flame/fanboy wars (generally speaking).
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
I'm probably overly cautious about this too. It seems to me like lately, I added one more reboot to my day: now, instead of doing it at the end of the day, and maybe once or twice during the day, I also begin the day with a reboot. I like things to be extra, extra fresh. lol
A reboot (or two) per day keep the OS OK!
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
My special needs come down to this: since I'm a DIY'er and since I'm already trying to avoid using everything that's built into Windows like Defender, Firewall, and Internet Explorer, I may as well also use a third-party defragger. But I didn't really choose Auslogics Disk Defrag for any other reason than it's really fast, does a great job, and isn't made by Microsoft. Plus, it has an automatic defragging feature than be customized in pretty fine detail, including setting up a schedule.
I look at it the other way, since it's included in the OS and does a good job why not use it? Although I have disabled Defender and the firewall.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
But if each defragger has certain logic, then I wonder how easy it would be to find out which one is best for me (err, best for my parents now that I have rebelled against hard drives).
I don't know the answer, it involves advanced understanding of HDs, file systems and other stuff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
In what ways do you mean? I mean, I see that you explained the ways, but I admit that I'm still confused. I went straight from XP to 7, so I should understand. Maybe I need to go run around to get some blood to my head.
I mean that changing habits is difficult. People were used to tweaking XP to get better perfomance (like disabling services, changing registry keys, etc.). With Vista/7 this is not needed for the most part, plus XP doesn't fully take advantage of modern hardware, since it's an 9 year (I believe) old OS, which is a very long time in the IT section.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
I don't use any cleanup! Maybe it's high time I started!
Sometimes it's really needed. For example, the YouTube webmasters try a new layout but then go back to the old one, if I didn't clean my browser's cache I would see everything messed up.
I use my PC everyday but I only clean (browser + OS) once a month. I also check on the HD's fragmentation level (which is always 0%-5%). Bear in mind that I'm just a kid playing on the PC, not a professional IT worker.

P.S.
You have messed up the last two quotes, they are not mine but weidass'.
Edited by link_90 - 11/10/10 at 3:57am
post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
Mmmh I've never heard of this, anyway as long as it works it's fine.
I tend to do many things that aren't commonly recommended but yet work perfectly for me.

Oh, and I forgot to mention that I also open control userpasswords2 via the Run command and I delete all other users but me (like the HomeGroup related user). And then I double-click my account (for Properties), switch to the Group Membership tab, select Administrator, and then I click "Apply" for good measure prior to clicking OK. Then I click "Apply' on the original window for good measure as well (I mean, I normally don't click "Apply", but I make an exception for this). After that, I do one last step: I select my account and then uncheck "Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer" and then I click OK. After this, a little dialog pops up asking me for my password. Except, I don't have a password, so I just click OK.

After that, I reboot and it's all good. But I'm also the only user on my computer.

Oh, and regarding the window that pops up when you open control userpasswords2: I don't know how else to get to this panel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
Actually in some cases the UAC could be counterproductive. I'm just a kid using the PC mostly for gaming, so some UAC prompts are not a big deal but for another person who works on the PC it could be. It's just personal preference. If people remembered this there would be less flame/fanboy wars (generally speaking).
hehe even with the default setting of the UAC, I still found it to be pretty irritating. It popped up for every single program I wanted to install, including Firefox. It's like "Go away! I know what I am doing!"

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
A reboot (or two) per day keep the OS OK!
Hey, nice! lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
I look at it the other way, since it's included in the OS and does a good job why not use it? Although I have disabled Defender and the firewall.
My reason for using it is because it does a better job and it is faster. But not all third-party defraggers are faster. One example is JKDefrag. But most of the commonly recommended defraggers are faster and better than the one built into Windows.

However, I wouldn't touch IObit's Smart Defrag with a 10-foot cyber pole.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
I don't know the answer, it involves advanced understanding of HDs, file systems and other stuff.

I mean that changing habits is difficult. People were used to tweaking XP to get better perfomance (like disabling services, changing registry keys, etc.). With Vista/7 this is not needed for the most part, plus XP doesn't fully take advantage of modern hardware, since it's an 9 year (I believe) old OS, which is a very long time in the IT section.
I still perform pretty much the same tweaks that I performed in XP, although they are a bit different. For example, I still go nuts with reducing the amount of Processes in the background as much as possible, and I definitely notice a difference (and it's not just the placebo effect either).

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
Sometimes it's really needed. For example, the YouTube webmasters try a new layout but then go back to the old one, if I didn't clean my browser's cache I would see everything messed up.
I use my PC everyday but I only clean (browser + OS) once a month.
Oh. I have Firefox set to clear the Cache upon exiting (and only the Cache). It's the setting in the Privacy tab in the Options for "Clear history when Firefox closes". I have everything unchecked except for Cache.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
I also check on the HD's fragmentation level (which is always 0%-5%). Bear in mind that I'm just a kid playing on the PC, not a professional IT worker.
The percentage may be a small number, but the number of fragments and fragmented files can be pretty large.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
P.S.
You have messed up the last two quotes, they are not mine but weidass'.
I was on a roll!
Edited by TwoCables - 11/10/10 at 4:12pm
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #27 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
hehe even with the default setting of the UAC, I still found it to be pretty irritating. It popped up for every single program I wanted to install, including Firefox. It's like "Go away! I know what I am doing!"
In this case I agree with you, having an UAC prompt for a program you use often is very irritating, but as I've said before I believe that it's not really the UAC's fault, programs are still made with in mind XP which is very different from Vista/7. Most programs that ask for higher privileges really don't need them.
The fact that Firefox asks for elevated privileges is very strange, it never happened to me (and I have the UAC at maximum level).
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
My reason for using it is because it does a better job and it is faster. But not all third-party defraggers are faster. One example is JKDefrag. But most of the commonly recommended defraggers are faster and better than the one built into Windows.
You're right, but I still prefer the built in defragmenter. I'm sorry for repeating it but it's just personal preference.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
I still perform pretty much the same tweaks that I performed in XP, although they are a bit different. For example, I still go nuts with reducing the amount of Processes in the background as much as possible, and I definitely notice a difference (and it's not just the placebo effect either).
Well, if you say it then I believe you but still, I don't do it.
Windows 7 (and probably Vista too) stops a service & process from running if it's not used (or stops it after some 'idle' time), plus considering the big amount of memory modern PCs have I find it not useful as it once was with XP. Vista/7 are more 'intelligent' meaning that they take full adavantage of modern hardware (I'm just stating the obvious, since they are newer OSs), less time spent on problems and more time for us!
If you mean disabling services/processes of third party applications, then I agree, I only have Speedfan and an ATI driver process (which isn't needed, but it occupies less than 1MB, so...) that starts with the OS.
Other services that should be disabled are the ones that could compromise the security of the OS, such as updaters, LAN stuff, etc. (if not using them of course).
Other thing (speaking in general, not to you specifically):
I've read a lot of people complaining that Vista/7 uses a lot more memory than XP. It's true but there's a reason: it reserves that space for making the OS faster (that's what I referred to with 'intelligent'). Plus, why have 4GB of RAM if you don't want the programs to use it? Of course using a very old PC with Vista/7 isn't a good idea, we're always talking of the fast-paced IT world.
I use a 64-bit OS with 2GB and I'm fine, I even play with no big issues (of course having other 2GB of RAM would make the performance increase).
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
Oh. I have Firefox set to clear the Cache upon exiting (and only the Cache). It's the setting in the Privacy tab in the Options for "Clear history when Firefox closes". I have everything unchecked except for Cache.
I knew the option but I actually never thought of using it. I think I'll try and see how it works.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
The percentage may be a small number, but the number of fragments and fragmented files can be pretty large.
Exactly.
It depends on the type of files one handles.

All IMHO of course. Peace!
Edited by link_90 - 11/12/10 at 3:23pm
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
In this case I agree with you, having an UAC prompt for a program you use often is very irritating, but as I've said before I believe that it's not really the UAC's fault, programs are still made with in mind XP which is very different from Vista/7. Most programs that ask for higher privileges really don't need them.
The fact that Firefox asks for elevated privileges is very strange, it never happened to me (and I have the UAC at maximum level).
I'm just referring to installing programs. But I bet I was remembering incorrectly about Firefox.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
You're right, but I still prefer the built in defragmenter. I'm sorry for repeating it but it's just personal preference.
But have you tried others, such as Auslogics Disk Defrag, Defraggler and any of the other commonly-recommended ones?

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
Well, if you say it then I believe you but still, I don't do it.
Windows 7 (and probably Vista too) stops a service & process from running if it's not used (or stops it after some 'idle' time), plus considering the big amount of memory modern PCs have I find it not useful as it once was with XP. Vista/7 are more 'intelligent' meaning that they take full adavantage of modern hardware (I'm just stating the obvious, since they are newer OSs), less time spent on problems and more time for us!
If you mean disabling services/processes of third party applications, then I agree, I only have Speedfan and an ATI driver process (which isn't needed, but it occupies less than 1MB, so...) that starts with the OS.
Other services that should be disabled are the ones that could compromise the security of the OS, such as updaters, LAN stuff, etc. (if not using them of course).
Other thing (speaking in general, not to you specifically):
I've read a lot of people complaining that Vista/7 uses a lot more memory than XP. It's true but there's a reason: it reserves that space for making the OS faster (that's what I referred to with 'intelligent'). Plus, why have 4GB of RAM if you don't want the programs to use it? Of course using a very old PC with Vista/7 isn't a good idea, we're always talking of the fast-paced IT world.
I use a 64-bit OS with 2GB and I'm fine, I even play with no big issues (of course having other 2GB of RAM would make the performance increase).
The thing I notice the most is that my reboot time is a little quicker, and my system generally feels just a tiny bit snappier. But hey, that's the pursuit of performance!

So, I do anything and everything I can to streamline my system as much as possible so that it's basically perfectly customized for me, and only me. Of course, there have to be a few things I could still change - I just find it hard to believe that I got everything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
I knew the option but I actually never thought of using it. I think I'll try and see how it works.
I think the reason why I started doing it is so that I could avoid those times when I would open up Firefox and have to refresh some of my tabs. I really can't remember the exact reason for it, but I remember it was a practical one. So you might discover it too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by link_90 View Post
Exactly.
It depends on the type of files one handles.

All IMHO of course. Peace!
hehe
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #29 of 32
I think this should be edited to include CCleaner for the registery..
Jake-PC1
(9 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4460 gigabyte evga gtx 770 SC 2x8gb ballistix 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOS
500GB Samsung 850 32GB Vertex 160GB 2.5 OS X 
OS
Windows 10 
  hide details  
Reply
Jake-PC1
(9 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4460 gigabyte evga gtx 770 SC 2x8gb ballistix 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOS
500GB Samsung 850 32GB Vertex 160GB 2.5 OS X 
OS
Windows 10 
  hide details  
Reply
post #30 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcshoejake View Post
I think this should be edited to include CCleaner for the registery..
Registry cleaning has and always will be a huge (misleading) scam. Most of these utilities are very, very shady.

To quote Ed Bott,

Quote:
Don’t run registry cleaner programs, period. I won’t go so far as to call them snake oil, but what possible performance benefits can you get from “cleaning up†unneeded registry entries and eliminating a few stray DLL files? Even in the best-case scenario the impact should be trivial at best. Maybe a second or two here and there, maybe a few kilobytes of freed-up RAM, and I’m being generous. How can you balance those against the risk that the utility will “clean†(in other words, delete) something you really need, causing a program or feature to fail?
and then later on...

Quote:
I urge you to check comparative reviews, ratings, and rankings of Registry Clean-up Tools before you invest hard-earned dollars on these products.†Sadly, there are no links here either. I suspect that’s because detailed comparative reviews of this class of software don’t exist. Ironically, the article inadvertently documents the case against this sort of utility. Early on, it states: “The typical Windows system has literally hundreds of thousands of Registry entries.†The screen shot from the free utility he spotlights shows a grand total of 19 “errors,†most of which are simply pointers to CLSIDs that don’t exist. Is it really worth spending hours on this task? I don’t think so.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Windows
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Windows › FAQ: Windows Maintenance and Tweaks: Do's and Don't's