Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Reguarding the 9x0 series Pent D's..
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Reguarding the 9x0 series Pent D's.. - Page 4

post #31 of 34
SATA 3.0 is a marketing gimic. Hard Drives can't even fully utalize 1.5GB/s.

The problem with getting the C0 revision of the Pentium D is, newegg.com and other retailers arn't going to tell you which one you are getting. Therefore, buying one on Monday, will probably ensure you will get a B1 revision. If you want the C0, you will have to wait.
System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 2500k ASRock P67 Extreme4 Gen 3 AMD 7970 16GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Intel 520 256GB SATA DVD Burner Windows 7 64 bit Deal U2410 
KeyboardPowerMouse
Adesso Mechanical Silverstone OP650 Logitech G700 
  hide details  
Reply
System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 2500k ASRock P67 Extreme4 Gen 3 AMD 7970 16GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Intel 520 256GB SATA DVD Burner Windows 7 64 bit Deal U2410 
KeyboardPowerMouse
Adesso Mechanical Silverstone OP650 Logitech G700 
  hide details  
Reply
post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by pauldovi
SATA 3.0 is a marketing gimic. Hard Drives can't even fully utalize 1.5GB/s.
SATA 3.0 is not even a version or standard. There is, in point of fact, no such thing as SATA 3.0. SATA II is commonly thought of as meaning 3 Gbps performance. This is incorrect Paul and calling SATA II as SATA 3.0 is, in point of fact, a misnomer. A SATA II device or component does not have to support 3 Gbps data transfer rates to be considered SATA II. Instead, a device is SATA II compliant if it can implement some combination of standard compliant advanced features, like native command queuing (NCQ).

The SATA-IO (Serial ATA International Organization) is the name of the organization responsible for authoring the current SATA II specification.

These Features are below:

Features of SATA II devices and components (disk drives, adapters, port multipliers and selectors, cabling and connectors) support 1.5 Gbps and 3 Gbps data transfer rates, along with some combination of features (asynchronous notification, ClickConnect, hot plug, power management, NCQ and staggered device spin-up, among others).

NCQ

NCQ is a performance enhancement for SATA II-category disk drives, and works similarly to the way command tag queuing (CTQ) works in SCSI command set-based disk drives (e.g. Fibre Channel (FC), SAS, UltraSCSI, etc). NCQ addresses the inherent inefficiencies, along with wear and tear on a disk drive due to excessive read/write head movement caused by random I/O patterns. As more I/Os arrive from more sources -- either different applications or different sources along with random I/O patterns in general -- this excessive disk head movement becomes more of an issue. As additional I/O operations arrive from different sources in a multi-stream, multi-I/O environment, more disk head "thrashing" can occur. To help cope with this issue, NCQ algorithms allow I/O operations to be performed out of order to optimize and leverage disk read/write head positioning and ultimately overall performance.

Port Multipliers

Using port multipliers, product providers can increase the number of SATA II disk drives that can attach to a single controller port. The port multiplier enables multiple SATA devices (disk drives) to fan-in (converge) to a single controller port, similar to how a switch or hub enables multiple devices to be accessed via a single port. This benefit is similar to that of FC, SAS, and UltraSCSI storage interfaces, but on a smaller scale in order to be able to have more than a couple of disk drives per SATA II controller interface. For example, SATA II supports up to 15 disk drives per controller interface, compared to the relatively small two disk limit of ATA master/slave configuration.

SAS and SATA co-existence

Not to be forgotten or lost in the discussion is the ability of SATA II devices to co-exist with SAS devices attached to a common SAS-based backplane and SAS-based controller interface. This is unique in that storage interfaces usually need to be attached to like interfaces: for example, FC to FC, SCSI to SCSI, SATA to SATA. SATA II, however, has the ability to co-exist and attach to a SAS-based controller and SAS-based backplane interconnect. The reverse is not supported, meaning that SAS devices cannot plug into SATA controllers. The benefit is that some high-performance SAS disk drives could be configured for low latency, high performance I/O, while SATA disk drives configured for storage and capacity-centric applications in the same disk shelf.

Research:

http://www.serialata.org/

R
Roped In
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 2600k P8P67 Pro Rev (3.1) @ B3 XFX Radeon HD 6950 XXX 16GB G.SKILL Ripjaws 9-11-9-28 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
2 X Callisto Deluxe 25nm 60GB Plextor PX-B910SA 4x Blu-ray DVD-RW Win7 64 2 x Samsung 275T+ 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech G15 Corsair HX10000 Antec 1200 Logitech G7 
Mouse Pad
Splatter Game Pad 
  hide details  
Reply
Roped In
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 2600k P8P67 Pro Rev (3.1) @ B3 XFX Radeon HD 6950 XXX 16GB G.SKILL Ripjaws 9-11-9-28 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
2 X Callisto Deluxe 25nm 60GB Plextor PX-B910SA 4x Blu-ray DVD-RW Win7 64 2 x Samsung 275T+ 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech G15 Corsair HX10000 Antec 1200 Logitech G7 
Mouse Pad
Splatter Game Pad 
  hide details  
Reply
post #33 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by pauldovi
The problem with getting the C0 revision of the Pentium D is, newegg.com and other retailers arn't going to tell you which one you are getting. Therefore, buying one on Monday, will probably ensure you will get a B1 revision. If you want the C0, you will have to wait.
The online retailers do infact tell us the steppings, through the order code. That 920 linked to newegg is indeed a B1 stepping, and there is still yet to be any release of a new stepping, probably will be the one and only stepping Intel makes...
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
T2500 Core Duo Dell Laptop Quadro 1500m flashed--> 7900GTX 2x1GB G.Skill DDR2-800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
200GB SATA 5400RPM 8x DVD±RW Burner XP Home SP2 17" LCD (1920x1200) + 20.1" Samsung Widescreen 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GE Keyboard 9 Cell Battery E1705 Frame Razer Diamondback 
Mouse Pad
Icemat 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
T2500 Core Duo Dell Laptop Quadro 1500m flashed--> 7900GTX 2x1GB G.Skill DDR2-800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
200GB SATA 5400RPM 8x DVD±RW Burner XP Home SP2 17" LCD (1920x1200) + 20.1" Samsung Widescreen 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GE Keyboard 9 Cell Battery E1705 Frame Razer Diamondback 
Mouse Pad
Icemat 
  hide details  
Reply
post #34 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by wowza
The online retailers do infact tell us the steppings, through the order code. That 920 linked to newegg is indeed a B1 stepping, and there is still yet to be any release of a new stepping, probably will be the one and only stepping Intel makes...
Quote:
Last month, Intel told customers it would not be upgrading the 920 to the C-1 core - it's currently on version B-1 - suggesting the part wasn't long for this world. All other 9xx dualies - the 930, 940 and 950 - are getting the update, which cuts the chips' overall power consumption.
http://www.channelregister.co.uk/200...s_pentium_920/

So it is not C0, it is C1. Opps

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ropey
This is incorrect Paul and calling SATA II as SATA 3.0 is, in point of fact, a misnomer.
2-1
System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 2500k ASRock P67 Extreme4 Gen 3 AMD 7970 16GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Intel 520 256GB SATA DVD Burner Windows 7 64 bit Deal U2410 
KeyboardPowerMouse
Adesso Mechanical Silverstone OP650 Logitech G700 
  hide details  
Reply
System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 2500k ASRock P67 Extreme4 Gen 3 AMD 7970 16GB DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Intel 520 256GB SATA DVD Burner Windows 7 64 bit Deal U2410 
KeyboardPowerMouse
Adesso Mechanical Silverstone OP650 Logitech G700 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel CPUs
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Reguarding the 9x0 series Pent D's..