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Surge Protector recommendation - Page 2

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
This is actually for my father-in-law so I'll pass the suggestion on to him.

What sort of things do you look for in surge protection? Maybe I'll look for a slightly cheaper option also and give him a choice.
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Alpha v.2
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post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddietz View Post
This is actually for my father-in-law so I'll pass the suggestion on to him.

What sort of things do you look for in surge protection? Maybe I'll look for a slightly cheaper option also and give him a choice.
It's difficult to explain why without making this into something complex, but one of the things I like about Tripp-Lite's surge suppressors as opposed to that Phillips unit is that I get to see all of its specifications. I mean, they don't hide anything at all!

Here's the list of specifications that I've come to learn are important as well as their values for the ISOBAR8ULTRA. These specs are not listed for the Phillips unit posted earlier, so it makes me wonder why it's only $20 (maybe it's a junker in disguise, I don't know):
  • AC suppression response time - NM = 0 ns. CM = <1 ns (most are this fast anyway, but still: it needs to be listed in the specs just as all of the specs below do - why hide them?)
  • Clamping voltage (RMS) - 140 (most good surge suppressors are at 150, but 140 is even better. Higher than 150 is not really recommended)
  • AC suppression surge current rating - 97,000 amps (36,000 NM / 61,000 CM) (I don't know what all this means, but this specification is not mentioned for my HT10DBS. Plus, out of all of Tripp-Lite's surge suppressors that mention this spec, this is the best one)
  • AC suppression components used - Metal oxide varistors, toroidal balanced chokes, ferrite rod-core inductors and VHF capacitors. (again, I don't know what all this means, but I do know one thing: it's important that the components are of high quality. Sadly, this specification is not mentioned for my HT10DBS which makes me wonder about it...)
  • Safe thermal fusing - Prevents unsafe conditions during extreme extended over-voltages and catastrophic occurrences (I'm impressed by this even though I don't fully understand it. Again, my badass HT10DBS doesn't have this. hehe)
  • UL1499 let through rating - 330V - UL Verified (330V is very good! The best consumer surge suppressors all have 330V. Some have slightly worse at 400V, and some even go as high as 500V, but 330V is almost the best!!)
  • IEEE587 Cat. A ringwave let through - Less than 35 volts (they tested this with 6,000V, and only 35V got through. My HT10DBS doesn't mention this one either.....)
  • EMI / RFI filtering - 40-80 dB. (mine is maxed at 60dB)
  • Isolated filter banks - Unique isolated filter bank design offers additional filtering between each duplex pair of outlets on the strip to prevent electrical noise interference between connected loads. Includes 4 filter banks. (on any Isobar unit, the outlets that have a screw inbetween them are the isolated banks - mine has this, but it's basically just a 6-outlet Isobar with 4 extra outlets)
  • Immunity - Conforms to IEE 587 / ANSI C62.41 (I don't know what this means either, but my HT10DBS doesn't have an Immunity rating)
  • Material of construction - Metal (it's better than plastic when it comes to protecting equipment because it's better at withstanding the strongest surges)

But all of this aside, what will your father-in-law use it for?
It's a computer!
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It's a computer!
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
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Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all that. Most seems intuitive to understand once you think to look at that.

It will be used for a desktop PC, Monitor, an external USB HDD, and maybe a laptop also on occasion.


Thanks again!
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Alpha v.2
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Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
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post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddietz View Post
Thanks for all that. Most seems intuitive to understand once you think to look at that.
You're very welcome!

But yeah, it is more important to learn this stuff than I realized. When I went to begin shopping for a surge suppressor over 2 years ago, I was under the impression that they were all the same. But then I somehow decided to shop around and then I found myself reading professional articles and reviews all over the internet. Before long, I ended up with the HT10DBS. But unfortunately, I didn't consider the other units (like the one I'm recommending today) because they don't look cool. Maybe they do in person, but I was after something kinda cool looking! lol Oh well... at least I didn't get some el cheapo to save time. But I could've spent half the price on something of superior quality. hehe

Quote:
Originally Posted by ddietz View Post
It will be used for a desktop PC, Monitor, an external USB HDD, and maybe a laptop also on occasion.


Thanks again!
Hmm... then I guess it'll be worth it! I was getting concerned that maybe this was overkill, but all of those PCBs in a computer are very sensitive. I even read that LCD monitors are even more sensitive (it has something to do with the LCD panel itself.. or something).

So damn, if he can afford this, then he'll have some extremely good protection. But there's one word of caution though: even the best surge suppressors can't protect against a lightning strike. So when a thunderstorm is approaching, it's best to play it safe and get off the grid and then stay off the grid until the thunderstorm is gone. This means to unplug absolutely everything that forms a connection to the outside world such as phone or internet - especially the surge suppressor (protect the investment which is protecting your investments).

Here's a quote I took and saved from a some article I found somewhere:

Quote:
It is only too obvious that lightning can cause large surges of power that can damage your computer. Few devices can protect your system from a direct strike, but if the storm is distant enough, then a good surge suppressor can help.
Only, I didn't save the part where it later discusses just unplugging everything including the surge suppressor. It talked about how even though a surge suppressor might protect your stuff from a lightning strike to the grid somewhere nearby, the surge suppressor itself might get killed in the process and its LEDs can even stay lit causing you to think it's still working! So they were more or less saying that for the best peace of mind, just get off the grid and wait for the storm to pass. After all, most storms to worry about only last maybe 15 minutes, 30 minutes, or 60 minutes.

So yeah, even to this day I still unplug the surge suppressor and wait it out. I don't want to take any chances.
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
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Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info again. I totally though a surge protector worked against lightning. I would expect it to fry with the strike but also to protect during its martyrdom. Good to know. I always unplug everything anyway, but still good to know.

Thank you again!
Alpha v.2
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Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
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Alpha v.2
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Phenom II 740be @ 3.63 (16.5 x 220) ASUS M3A78-CM XFX HD4850 Crucial 2x2GM DDR2-800 6-6-6-18 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
WD Black 500GB OS/Programs, WD 1Tb + 800 GB data Sony DVD-RW Win 7x64 Professional Dell 22" 
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Antec Earthwatts 650 Antec 300 w/5 fans 
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post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddietz View Post
Thanks for the info again. I totally though a surge protector worked against lightning. I would expect it to fry with the strike but also to protect during its martyrdom. Good to know. I always unplug everything anyway, but still good to know.

Thank you again!
You're very welcome!

But yeah, the better ones have a greater potential of sacrificing their lives (so to speak) in order to protect everything that's plugged into it even though their "Protection Working" LEDs might remain lit afterward. But again, here's that excerpt from that article I saved (the one where I wish I had saved the entire thing, or at least more of it):
Quote:
It is only too obvious that lightning can cause large surges of power that can damage your computer. Few devices can protect your system from a direct strike, but if the storm is distant enough, then a good surge suppressor can help.
I think the most important part of this is where it says "but if the storm is distant enough..." because the surges that a lightning strike can create can be devastating to things like a computer, especially when it's a direct hit to the electrical grid somewhere (or even the phone/cable line). But even strikes that miss the grid but maybe hit a tree instead can still send a potentially computer-devastating surge.

Now, I don't know the approximate safe distance, so when a storm is nearby or about to pass through, I unplug my surge suppressor and wait it out since it only lasts for a short time (almost always less than an hour, usually much less).

So instead of being protection from lightning, they're actually more to protect from the seemingly frequent occurrence of little surges that happen all day and every day. Most of the surges seem to come directly from the power plant that provides power to the city, and then the rest come from inside the home when things are either turned on or off, such as the microwave, a space heater, a window air conditioner, a freezer/refrigerator, a dehumidifier, a hair drier, a washer and drier, a vacuum cleaner (can or upright), a decent-sized CRT-type television, the central air and heating unit, an electric stove or oven, power tools (even when run from the garage), a leaf blower, electric lawn mower, etc., etc., etc. It's my understanding that the surges created by such appliances aren't necessarily dangerous on their own, but it's that they happen every single day and that they're combined with the little surges that are always coming from the power plant.

However, I think the worst appliance is a washing machine. When my mom's washing machine is in operation, the brightness of every light bulb in the house seems to pulsate a little bit, especially when the washer is using its agitator. Although, it's only possible to notice this when taking the time to watch the light emitted from a light bulb for a few seconds.

But yeah, up until I decided to buy a surge suppressor, I believed that their purpose was to just protect against lightning strikes, and that they were all basically the same.
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
Again, thanks! I know what you mean about the washer, mine is very similar. They must draw a ton of amperage at times. I bet in all reality washers should probably be 220V rather than 110

Anyway, thanks!
Alpha v.2
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II 740be @ 3.63 (16.5 x 220) ASUS M3A78-CM XFX HD4850 Crucial 2x2GM DDR2-800 6-6-6-18 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
WD Black 500GB OS/Programs, WD 1Tb + 800 GB data Sony DVD-RW Win 7x64 Professional Dell 22" 
PowerCase
Antec Earthwatts 650 Antec 300 w/5 fans 
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Reply
Alpha v.2
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II 740be @ 3.63 (16.5 x 220) ASUS M3A78-CM XFX HD4850 Crucial 2x2GM DDR2-800 6-6-6-18 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
WD Black 500GB OS/Programs, WD 1Tb + 800 GB data Sony DVD-RW Win 7x64 Professional Dell 22" 
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Antec Earthwatts 650 Antec 300 w/5 fans 
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post #18 of 18
You're very welcome! It is a pleasure to be able to help!
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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