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System failing to post

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi all. Trying to overclock for the first time. Obviously i'm noobing something up pretty good. I've got an EVGA P55 FTW board with a Core i7 875k processor. I recently flashed the newest BIOS (A72), and started from the optimal settings. I'm following a guide I found here. So far, I've been able to set the clock ratio to x15, the memory to 2:6, and the bclock to 150MHz. My VTT is set to 1.2V, and my QPI is at the lowest manual setting. I have SpeedStep, C1E, and C-STATE turned off.

The system boots fine like this, and passes stress tests through IntelBurnTest (maximum setting). However, when I go back into the BIOS and increase the bclock to 160MHz (the article says to step up in increments of 10 until you find your max stable speed), the system won't post. I even tried increasing the bclock by only 5MHz and still no post.

I've attached the CPU-Z output file for full system specs. Hopefully I'm making a rookie mistake that one of you will spot with ease. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

MORE INFO:
My RAM is Corsair DDR3 1600MHz, 2x2GB. Video card is GeForce GTX 460. Forgot to mention that in original post.
Edited by mpipkin76 - 12/23/10 at 7:11pm
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post #2 of 9
from what you said it sounds like you need more voltage...

want my advice, instead of following those dumb guides?


set a high voltage for your vtt and vcore, set the clock you want, then start testing to reduce them to the lowest value you can.

for example, I started with 1.4vcore and 1.35vtt, clock to 4000mhz and mem to stock settings, then started to work my way down to the lowest voltage possible to rock solid stability.

much faster this way... instead of increasing both voltages and clocks to reacha stable oc... that's just dumb... working with 2 variables instead of 1..
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
OK EduFurtado, so far you win +1 Internets (and rep). System posted and booted just fine on the first try with your settings recommended above. However, it failed a maximum stress test on the second pass. RealTemp showed highest core temp at 88C, and the stress test bailed out. Which voltage should I try stepping down first -- vcore or vtt? Also, should I be setting both the bootup and eventual vcore and vtt to the same number?

A couple other things, if I can pick your brain: My BIOS has a setting called Extreme Cooling. It's off by default, but has two settings to turn it on, Mode 1 and Mode 2. I can't seem to find anywhere if it's advantageous to turn that on. Also, I have VDroop Control set to Without VDroop. Does that sound right? Lastly, the PCIE frequency is 100MHz by default. One post I saw on here showed it set to 104MHz. Any tips on that one?

Thanks again.
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post #4 of 9
To lower the voltages, use a binary process, for example:


It's 1.4vcore, right?
Set it down to 1.3v
If fails, try again with 1.35, if it doesn't lower to 1.2v

In the 1.35v case, if it fails... try 1.375, if not 1.225
in the 1.2v case, if it fails, try 1.25, if not 1.1v and so on, until you reach the best

I don't really remember what I found out first, but I remember I used linX for the Vcore and for VTT I used a custom prime95 test: select the first option (small ftts or ffts) then select custom. Unmark in-place ftts or ffts and change the memory to how much you got available - 50mb - it would show errors withing around 1 hour and 20 minutes of testing.
Ah, but I did this test only after using linx to find vtt faster... but it wasn't good enought for it, so my CPU was able to get stable with only 1.2vtt to run linX, but not enought to run this test of mine or blend (I was also getting some bsods meanwhile I thought it was stable)

ps: LinX is intel burn test with a easy to use GUI...
it's the fastest way to test, and the one that will generate the most heat...

On the binary process I was doing only 20 runs... but it's like prime95, the longer you run, the better.. but those 20 runs were only for quick tests.. for final stability I did more than 100 runs, hours and hours of prime's tests, memtest86, superpi and gaming...
post #5 of 9
BTW, fill your system settings, to do so go on UserCP > System Information (on the left) > Add System

Now, for your questions...

Extreme cooling is for people using LN2 or DICE, and I believe that's not our case. turning it on if we are not cooling like that has DISVANTAGES! so don't do it.

Vdroop is how a tecnology called LLC or LCC on normal boards is called on EVGA's boards
vdroop on - LCC off and vice versa...

well....
I'll try to explain what it's meant to do, instead of what it does.
When you overclock, we usually stress our system to see if it's stable.
the problem is our tests don't usally cover idle settings...
So that's what vdroop does, it ensures that IF your system is stable under load, it will automatically be stable at idle, or mid load situations (like gaming, where you load is not 100%, depends on the game, but usually not more than 80%...

It works by making your idle voltages higher than your load voltages...

Well... it may sound stupid to raise it, instead of just keeping it the same, or something else.. but.. well.. to be short it isn't, BUT it can make overclocking harder, actually it makes overclocking harder, once we get to higher clocks (4ghz and above, for example) so I recommend you to just leave it off (idle voltages lower than load voltages)
But watch out if your "rock solid" overclock BSODs when you are brosing the web, writing a word document or playing a casual game... it might be not enought voltage.




Btw, your chip is much easier to overclock than mine.. because of that K in there
this means that all you have to do is adjust the multiplier...
well... you can also forget avout VTT (not really sure) and maybe PCH and that other one I forgot the name, if you increase your clock only with the multiplier, so that you don't mess with RAM or the other components...

one more thing... every chip is different, so find your own sweet spot for every setting..
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
OK, I've filled my system settings. I ran the Prime95 test you suggested, but it only made it the second test before my core temp got up to 97C, so I stopped it. It didn't return any errors, but that's awfully hot...

Also, the system passed IntelBurnTest on High, but failed on Maximum, reaching a max temp of 93C along the way.

So, about the multiplier -- what makes for the most stable system: A high bclock with a lower multiplier, or vice versa. For example, I'm currently running a bclock of 2000MHz with a multiplier of 20 = 4GHz. Would my system be better off if I went with 1820MHz and a multiplier of 22 = 4GHz, or with 2220MHz and a multiplier of 18 = 4GHz? Are there specific advantages or disadvantages to any particular method of hitting that target?
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post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
I may have just answered my own question. I tried setting my bclock to 1820MHz and my multiplier to 22, so I'm still getting 4GHz. I then ran the IntelBurnTest on Maximum again, and this time it passed (although it hit 98C right at the end). The Prime95 test still rockets my temps up pretty fast, but hopefully with a bit more tweaking, I can get that under control too.

Quick question to see if I'm grasping what you've posted so far -- When working to overclock my system, I want the highest possible CPU frequency coupled with the lowest possible Vcore and VTT voltages that will result in a stable system, correct? Is this because higher voltages contribute directly to more heat?

On a tangent now, I know we haven't talked about RAM here, but I noticed your membory is running at 8-8-8-24. Mine (on auto settings) is 11-11-11-29, but from what I've read, lower numbers are better there, right? When I tried to manually set the memory to 8-8-8-24, I get a BSOD during bootup every time. Is it worth worrying about that?
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post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpipkin76 View Post
I may have just answered my own question. I tried setting my bclock to 1820MHz and my multiplier to 22, so I'm still getting 4GHz. I then ran the IntelBurnTest on Maximum again, and this time it passed (although it hit 98C right at the end). The Prime95 test still rockets my temps up pretty fast, but hopefully with a bit more tweaking, I can get that under control too.

Quick question to see if I'm grasping what you've posted so far -- When working to overclock my system, I want the highest possible CPU frequency coupled with the lowest possible Vcore and VTT voltages that will result in a stable system, correct? Is this because higher voltages contribute directly to more heat?

On a tangent now, I know we haven't talked about RAM here, but I noticed your membory is running at 8-8-8-24. Mine (on auto settings) is 11-11-11-29, but from what I've read, lower numbers are better there, right? When I tried to manually set the memory to 8-8-8-24, I get a BSOD during bootup every time. Is it worth worrying about that?

It's better to mess with the multi other than the bclock alone.
The reason for this is that the bclock is used to control the speed of many components on your motherboard, no just your CPU. RAM, for example.
The thing is, messing with those components can be hard, and you will not really get a big difference in term of performance.
For example, a 200mhz in ram is HARD to get, with good timmings. but that will only give you a 0.5 FPS in a few games. People who overclock RAM are those looking for the maximun performance, like benchmarkers, looking to rip 0.1 second of their superpi time to win a torunament
So YES, it's better to mess with the multi. Since you have a more expensive K processor, which means it has an unlocked multi, mess with it.
My chip can only go up to 20multi. The normal 870 can go to x22, and yours is the same as the 870, but with that multi unlocked.

btw, I forgot to mention about the pci-e clock you asked me yesterday (I was sleepy like a zombie) Well, want my advice? Don't mess with it!
It will not magically overclock your pci-e cards giving a performance boost (that's the first thing we think of whem we see it) but others also meantion that it can improve stability, like you mentioned from the guide.
The thing is... pci-e clock is kinda mistical... people say complely different things about it, and nobody seems to show proof. like it can damage your system, can make or not your system more stable, etc.
What I KNOW is... it doesn't really give you enought performance to justify mesing with it (just like RAM) and yes, it can make your system more stable, but that's on an extreme overclock, which is not our case... so just leave it at 100mhz.
Btw, it's so messy because it control many things in your mobo, not just pci-e video card related stuff, but some stuff related to the SB, like sata HDDs




for your question about voltage X heat: YES you are correct.
basic physics: U = R.i
So if you increase the voltage you will also increase resistance (more heat out of the processor) as well as the power (more stability)

btw... the "problem" with heat is that (specially on AMD CPUs and GPUs) is that the more heat, the worse it will conduct electricity, which means more instability. I said this is a problem for the erveryday user.. but for those extreme OCers this is great, sicne they keeo the processor under 0C

but yes... you are correct. maybe I told you to start with too high values on those tests - 1.4v for my processor, maybe you should lower it to 1.35v or 1.3v at first....
btw, intel states 72C for our processors as safe temps...

intel burn test/ linx are the programs that will generate more heat.
so read it like this:
85C on linx = 77C on prime95 blend = 72C maximum temp on normal usage ---- those values are not accurate, obviously.. it's just for you to have an idea..
so when testing, don't really mind going to 85C or 90C at MOST - cancell you tests and lower your voltages if temps are raising that high

and again, that's the beauty of overclocking.. the highest clock, with the lowest voltages and so the lowest temps.
my system is stable at 1.4v but it only need 1.35v... that's the beauty of overclocking



well.. I think I have answered you RAM question previously...
just think about all those timming numbers.. you've got to mess with all of them to make it stable... too many variables! just leave it at stock settings (no auto, try to manually set them to stock settings) loose them a little if you need - for example, if they are meant to be 8-8-8-8, leave them at 9-9-9-9

maybe you should mess with the T value (forgot the name) but it's the one that can be 1T or 2T
that can help a lot on instability - but you might not need to mess with it, if you OC only with your multi, that will change only the CPU clock and leave RAM and other components stable as stock settings!
post #9 of 9
any updates?
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