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3D rendering app for nubs.... - Page 2

post #11 of 13
yeah forget the noob part you have to learn, in fact that model above is where i did most of my learning i made almost completely out of basic shapes.

http://www.polycount.com/forum/

thats a good forum that has been recommended on OCN before.
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post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncholowapo View Post
Best bet for free would be Blender. As far as the noob part is concerned, all rendering aspects will differ. A common knowledge of material selection, lighting, and camera use can make a good start for any rendering you do. Then it all comes down to learning how to implement that in the program of your choice.
This man speaks the truth. Rendering is the most difficult part of a 3d model. For a static scene, laying out a mesh is pretty simple. What makes it look good or real are textures and lighting. Camera work does play a part in it but not to the extent of textures and lighting.

Look at textures. Say you were making a brick wall. It's one thing to just make a mesh and throw a repeating texture on it. People will get the idea but it'll look like something out of wolfenstein 3d. It's a whole other bag of oranges to take that texture, drop the saturation and blast the contrast to use as a bump map.

What's the difference? Well let's take a look. Here is a very quick and dirty render in blender3d. Two planes with a brick texture, a simple lamp and camera.

The plane to the right has a bump map enabled. I just took the brick texture over to gimp, desaturated it and bumped the contrast way up. On that second texture, I imported that image, took off the color influence and set it to effect the geometry.

Attachment 186899

You can see the plane to the right has the bricks pop out due to the bump map. They will now cast their own small but more realistic shadows with an overhead light.
    
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post #13 of 13
There is a lot of misinformation floating around this thread. Albeit, some good stuff, too. I use sketchup as my modeler, so I'll give my own input. Kerkythea was the free renderer that I learned on. Now, they have stopped support for Kerk, and are commercializing a new renderer called Thea. You can pick it up for half price right now (about $150, I think - since it is still in beta), so it is very very affordable. They are still adding features. You can download a trial that has all the features of the full version, but limits resolution and adds a watermark. You can still download and use kerkythea, but I would recommend making the jump to the better program. Some people will tell you they like the renderers that work within sketchup. I prefer stand-alone studios so you are not limited by sketchups low polygon count. Thea is sort of a mix between in-sketchup and stand-alone.

I can honestly say that it is one of the easiest to learn, has tons of options, and can produce great results with little modification. Here is a work in progress. I have only used modified sketchup textures on the townhouse, and a physical sky. This is a raw render, with no post-production in photoshop or the like. If you want some more info, I'll help where I can.

This thread is full of good info:
http://www.overclock.net/case-mods-g...up-thread.html
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