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How often should you defrag your SSD? - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tspherix View Post
I have Kingmax SSD in one of my netbooks and unless I defrag it, it becomes really slow.


Quote:
I would only guess this is because of the bottleneck effect of ram HDDs.


Quote:
I'm still confused as to why a lot of techs don't see any need at all to defragment a drive


Anyway, the real question to ask yourself is "how does this technology work and would it benefit from this methodology?". Defragmenting is beneficial as there is a significant seek time when finding data on a rotating magnetic platter. In order to alleviate exponential amounts of seek time by having to 'gather up' all of your data stream, you would collect it together ahead of time. There is no rotating platter within an SSD, and data can be accessed in parallel, simultaneously. Therefore, defragmenting is completely irrelevant on SSD.
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post #12 of 15
So even if files are all over the chips in disarray, the parallel access type of SSDs eliminates the need to organize the files for the filesystem? Even for the larger files like MBR and pagefiles in windows?
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post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tspherix View Post
I'm still confused as to why a lot of techs don't see any need at all to defragment a drive, given that unless you are using a type of operating system that always puts files in perfect order when deleting and moving, any drive on classic layout should need periodic defragmentation. Somebody have some beefy info for figuring this out?
You don't need to defrag, it's a windows only thing. The reason is other systems (tend) to write files in whole chunks, they try and keep file parts in large blocks. Mainly files are stored as whole files, they try not to write in fragments. This helps prevent fragmentation and causes you to not need to defragment. As long as there are enough free blocks to write the file the OS will write the file as a continuous file. Laymens terms: As long as the files you (or your OS) "save" are not larger than your largest amount of free blocks you have you will never need to defragment, period.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tspherix View Post
So even if files are all over the chips in disarray, the parallel access type of SSDs eliminates the need to organize the files for the filesystem? Even for the larger files like MBR and pagefiles in windows?
Yes. Think of it this way, instead of waiting for the platter to spin to access the next 8 blocks of data you can just access it.


[1.1][0.2][0.4][1.5][0.6][1.7][1.8]

Now lets say each of those sections are on different rows in a platter, you'll have to access 1.5 on a new rotation (depending on the location of the data, for this example lets just say you do). You then have to wait another rotation to get 1.7 and 1.8. Now on an SSD you can just access those locations, there are no rows. SSDs store data more like an array/grid. Those could be in separate rows but you have no moving parts, so you can just move in a straight line from block to block. all the 1.X blocks can be read at once.

Defragging that doesn't do anything, you still access the data in a single read instead of waiting for the platter to move. All defragging does is move data closer together so you don't have to do that (files are now continuous with no gaps). You can now read every 1.X because they are all in order on a platter (SSD has no row so to speak and no parts that you wait on).
Edited by mushroomboy - 6/17/11 at 12:02pm
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post #14 of 15
Hard drives can only access 1 file at a time. SSD's can access thousands of files at once.

Lets say you want to read part of files A, B, C, D, and E.

A hard drive would go: A -> B -> C-> D-> E in order

An SSD would go:

-> A
-> B
-> C
-> D
-> E

all at once.

There is no need to defragment SSDs.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riou View Post
Hard drives can only access 1 file at a time. SSD's can access thousands of files at once.
SSDs cannot access thousands of files at once.

They can only access up to 8-10 pages at once.
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