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AMD Overclock Guide for newbs!

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OCN member stonedzen presents


A Beginner's/Intermediate's Guide to Tight Budget Overclocking:


Getting the Most out of your AMD Gaming Rig


4th Revision



Introduction:

I have seen many new AMD overclockers here lately and many of them seem to have no clue what they are doing (no offense). I was in their shoes a while ago, and feel I should share what I have learned. This guide is primarily intended for PC gamers, but the information it contains should apply to any new or intermediate AMD overclocker.

The guide itself is based on my discussions here on OCN and my personal projects and experiments. It also contains a tremendous amount of independent research on my part. I have learned a lot since I joined this community and I wanted to provide that knowledge to new members in a way that is concise and easy-to-understand without leaving any questions unanswered.

Much of this information was provided by the members of the OCN community and I thank them for their help. Please feel free to provide feedback and/or suggestions that could make this guide more complete.


Contents:
1) Why Overclock AMD?
2) Video Card!
3) Proper Cooling
4) Know Your Stuff
5) Methods of Overclocking: Multipliers vs Ref-Clock
6) Using Caution and Testing Often
7) RAM, Bandwidth vs. Timings
8) My Experiences with the 955 BE C2
9) Conclusion



Chapter 1: Why Overclock AMD?

It is no secret that Intel performs better than AMD when comparing the same clock speeds side by side. However, it is also no secret that Intel components are far more expensive, an important factor when you have other components to invest in like a video card or motherboard. When considering a serious overclock on a tight budget, AMD is the more affordable choice.

AMD has competitive pricing that Intel simply cannot match and that has been the key to their success over the years as a company. Six-core AMD processors can be found for under $200 online while quad-cores can be found for as cheap as $120. Some of the best chips for price performance are a meager $90...being dual-cores that almost always unlock to four cores and overclock beyond to 3.5ghz or higher with ease.

This brings me to the first point every overclocker should know about AMD; AMD grows many of their different processors on the same silicon wafers. This means that all processor revisions of the same code-name are manufactured the same way. For example, the Deneb 955 is the same chip as the Deneb 925. Once AMD has cut the chips from the wafer, they test them for imperfections, energy efficiency and overall performance. The sorting process is complicated and I obviously do not know all the details. However, the point still stands that when comparing different chips of the same code-name and revision, the pricing of the chips is based on inherent quality and not on differing architectures.

Because of AMD's method of classification and pricing, occasionally a consumer gets a chip that performs well over expectations. These chips "slipped through the cracks" so to speak, being chips that could have been classed higher, with a higher clock speed and sometimes one or two more cores.

For example, say little Jimmy buys a Phenom II X4 945 3.0 for $135 and while his friend little Billy gets a Phenom II X4 965 BE 3.4 for $159. Little Jimmy got a good chip and finds he can overclock his his 945 to 3.8ghz with only 1.4v, while little Billy can get to 3.8ghz on the stock 1.35v. In this case Jimmy's chip is running a little hotter but still pulling the same clock from a less expensive chip. Granted Billy could probably overclock his chip higher than 3.8 if he increased his voltage, neither one would see a considerable performance increase over the other (especially while gaming) and one of them spent less money to get there.

I will of course note that it doesn't always work that way and that intentionally buying cheap with AMD does not always pay off. Generally, the higher rated AMD chip you buy, the more overclocking headroom you will have. But remember, when it comes to casual usage and gaming there is a point where ridiculous overclocks will no longer make a real-world difference. Deciding a goal for your ideal overclock and then finding the least expensive processor to get you there is the best way to start a budget gaming system.

Remember, every AMD chip is guaranteed to run at its stock clock speed. Buying cheaper chips and attempting overclocks/core unlocks can significantly increase your price/performance, and at the very least, if the chip doesn't overclock well, you've still got a chip worth exactly what you paid for it.

I once again want to reiterate that I am not suggesting you buy the cheapest chip you can find. Instead I am suggesting you spend only as much as you need on your processor, thus saving as much of your hard earned money as possible to put towards other components.


Chapter 2: Video Card!

This guide deals primarily with mainboard, RAM and CPU overclocking, however, since it is intended for the AMD gamer it would be foolish to ignore the importance of video cards. The video card will make or break a gaming system no matter what CPU clock you run. Before you overclock your system at all, ask yourself if your video card will be able to keep up. If you are looking for frames-per-second(fps) in a game, the video card does most of the work. Invest in a good video card if you have any intention of noticing a difference when overclocking. Otherwise, your old video card may find itself working its ass off while your ridiculously overclocked CPU has barely broken a sweat.

If you can't afford to buy a modern mid-high range video card you can consider a Crossfire or Sli solution, and buying a second copy of your existing card. But remember, Crossfire and Sli do not scale perfectly. Most of the time a mid-high end single card solution is better. Besides, getting a new card now leaves the possibility of buying another later on when you need the extra performance. The decision should really depend on your budget and how much you want to future-proof your system.

If you are considering buying a new video card, consult with your peers at OCN...tell them what you have already and what your budget is and they will give you plenty of advice on your future purchase. Also, many members sell or trade their unused equipment, so check the "for sale/wanted" section of the forum if you are seeking a good deal on used equipment.

If you are considering an overclock for your video card, please do your research. The same principles apply to GPU overclocking as to CPU overclocking, but different cards have different capabilities and different risks. This is especially true of voltage tampering on video cards...many people have destroyed their cards by overvolting.

If you have done your research, I suggest using MSI Afterburner to overclock the card. It is easy to use, based on Rivatuner (major points there) and as a bonus, you can download lots of cool skins for it.


Chapter 3: Proper Cooling

CPU cooling:
If you intend to overclock an AMD processor, you better have a new cooling solution. Overclocking on the stock cooler is almost impossible as temperatures go out of control and overvoltage is next to impossible. Selecting a decent tower heatsink fan (HSF) or water-cooling solution is a must.

Finding the right CPU cooler for you is not a perfect science, it is a blend of personal preference, case-space, and budget. I am a function over aesthetics overclocker...thus I prefer the cooling system that works best for price/performance and not necessarily the one that looks the best. I think the Zalman 9500 aluminum towers are beautiful but they are way more expensive and far less effective than my old Cooler Master Hyper 212+.

When shopping for a decent cooling solution, using consumer reviews works best, as I feel professional reviews are very often in the pocket of the manufacturer. Be weary of reviews that have absolutely nothing critical to say about the product. Even small time you-tube reviewer of products can be compromised, as the manufacturer often gives the product to the reviewer for free as incentive for a positive review. Professional reviews on sites like TomsHardware and consumer reviews on sites like Newegg are the most genuine in my opinion.

Most HSFs that blow down onto the processor will not be very good for overclocking. They create a whirlwind of hot air blowing off the chip onto your Mosfets, chipsets and memory. Using the push/pull tower method will be your best bet for dissipating heat. In most computer cases, setting the tower to blow air horizontally towards your rear exhaust fan will give you the lowest CPU temps. That being said, you should experiment with your case and HSF and figure out what setup works best for you.

Water cooling isn't really an option for budget buyers as the money can be better spent on a faster CPU, faster memory or a better video card. Some water-ish HSFs are coming onto the market (ie: Corsair H50 and H70 series and the CoolIT Systems VAN-R120), though I personally find these grossly overpriced for their performance....if considering spending a over $100 for a cooling solution why not consider spending the extra $30 and getting a Rasa RS240 kit and try some real water cooling.

Mosfet Cooling:
Motherboard quality can make or break a decent CPU overclock. Your motherboard carries the Mosfets and capacitors that regulate the voltage of your processor. When increasing vcore to stabilize a CPU overclock, you are increasing the amount of power cycling through your system. If you increase your clock higher than your Mosfets can handle (or if your board's Mosfets are cheap) you may end up frying one or more of them. If this happens your board becomes a very expensive paperweight and will require complete replacement.

When considering a CPU overclock, do research to see if your board can handle it. Does your board have cheap Mosfets? If so, you should probably replace the board before taking any risks. Are the Mosfets on your board exposed? If so, you will want to seriously consider putting some heatsinks on them, or at least get a fan blowing on them....both would be better.

Case cooling:
Case cooling is also important. This may be a no brainer, but the longer heat lingers in the case, the harder it is to cool your CPU and components. Consider some of these options to improve your case cooling: 1) Buy some high performance fans to replace the stock ones, 2) modify your case to add additional fans, or 3) buy an entirely new case with better airflow (if your budget allows). I have upgraded my relatively old and cheap Centurion 5 case from two moderate fans (a 120mm and an 80mm) to six high cfm fans (three 120mm and three 80mm, not including my four 40mm hdd cooling or dual HSF tower 120s in push/pull). Good case cooling makes a huge difference, trust me!

Memory cooling:
Memory cooling is not especially important so long as they have decent heatsinks on them. You may consider adding a memory fan cooler or upgrading your heatsinks, though I would consult your peers on the forums before making a purchase. However, if you want to upgrade your memory cooling solution for looks....go right ahead, some memory coolers out there look pretty fancy.


Chapter 4: Know Your Stuff

It is almost time to overclock your system, but first lets talk about how your system works, how different components are linked together and how the system communicates with itself.

A gaming computer is like an athlete of a competitive sport. The CPU is its brain, the hypertransport link is its nervous system, the internal memory controller is its heart, the RAM are its lungs, and the video card is its muscles. Only if these components are tuned equally well to work with each other will you see a significant (and cost effective) increase in performance.

Now to be more technical:

CPU: The Central Processing Unit performs the basic arithmetical, logical, and input/output operations of the system. Every CPU has a clock rate which is the fixed number of clock ticks (or clock cycles) that it uses to execute instructions. Clock rates are measured in hertz (Hz), one tick per hertz (1000 ticks per megahertz, 1000000 ticks per gigahertz, etc). Thus the higher the set clock cycle rate, the more instructions executed per second.

Reference Clock: Often called FSB in the bios, Front Side Bus is actually a thing of the past in AMD systems. Since the Early Athlons, it has been replaced by a Hypertransport Link (see HT link below). On modern systems, the reference clock is a variable that determines the CPU and chipset speeds when combined with their multipliers/ratios.

The reference clock in modern AMD systems is usually 200mhz. Increasing the CPU multiplier while keeping the reference clock the same will increase the CPU clock speed but will not increase the speed in which the CPU communicates with other chipsets and the RAM.

Example: If a CPU is stock clocked at 3400mhz and the FSB (reference clock) runs a bandwidth of 200mhz, then they are running at a ratio of 17:1. Most modern bios would call this a CPU Multiplier or Ratio of 17. Increasing this multiplier to 17.5 (17.5:1) would result in a CPU clock of 3500mhz (200x17.5).

The reference clock speed also affects the speed of the Internal Memory Controller (usually listed as CPU-NB - see below) and RAM through their ratios (or multipliers). Increasing the reference clock while maintaining stock ratios will increase the RAM bandwidth and CPU-NB frequency.

Example: Say little Jimmy overclocks his reference clock to 220mhz over its stock speed of 200mhz without changing any of his ratios. His stock RAM ratio is 3:1, thus his Dual channel RAM speed which was 1333mhz (ref-clock*3:1*dual channel, or 200mhz*3.33*2=1333) is now running at 1465mhz (220*3.33*2). Likewise, the Internal Memory Controller was running a stock ratio of 11:1 (or CPU-NB Multiplier 11) and thus running a clock speed of 2200mhz (200x11) will now run at 2420mhz (220x11).

Increasing reference clock speed can cause instability due to the fact it affects so many other parts of your system. Since it is the system reference clock, increasing it will increase everything in your system (except peripherals that have their own buses off the north or south bridges, like AGP, PCIe and I/O devices).

HT Link: On modern AMD platforms the Hypertransport Link is the replacement for the front side bus. It is the bandwidth through which information travels between the Processor/IMC and the Northbridge chipsets. It should be noted that increasing the HT link bandwidth does not make information travel faster between the CPU and the rest of your system, instead it will increase the amount of information that can travel between the two chips.

In layman terms: Think of the CPU and Northbridge as two different cities and the Hypertransport Link as a highway that connects them. Lets pretend 1000mhz of HT bandwidth is equivalent to two lanes, one traveling in each direction. If your HT runs stock at 2000mhz, then you have a four-lane highway connecting the cities, with two lanes traveling in each direction. If you were to overclock your HT link to 3000mhz, then you have essentially increased the highway to six lanes, with three lanes traveling in each direction. Each car on this highway represents a bit of information traveling between the two chips. Depending on how much traffic on the highway (how much information is traveling on the HT bandwidth) you may or may not experience a performance gain by overclocking the HT link.

Generally, increasing the HT Link yields no benefit whatsoever. In fact, most of the time the increase leads to instability and a performance decrease. Only mess with your HT Link if you are an experienced overclocker and know what you are doing. Otherwise, leave it at stock or as close to stock as possible.

Internal Memory Controller: The Internal Memory Controller (usually called CPU-NB in bios) is often overlooked by new overclockers. It is the hub from which the CPU connects to the Hypertransport Link, and thus the rest of your system. It also connects directly with your memory bank. Overclocking the CPU-NB yields a significant real-world performance gain. However, overclocking the IMC usually requires a voltage increase that will inevitably translate to higher CPU temps.

Note: IMC temps are linked with your CPU temps and have nothing to do with your Northbridge chipset.

RAM: Random Access Memory is where all information is temporarily stored when being used by a program. Due to the slow access times of most hard drives (SSD is the only true exception), information that is currently in high demand by programs or you OS is plugged into the RAM for near instantaneous access times. The beauty of RAM is that nothing stored in it is permanent. Once the information isn't needed (say you close the program you were using), it is cleared to make room for new information that is needed.

Memory affects system performance in two ways: its bandwidth speed (how fast it communicates with the IMC) and its latency timings (how fast it accesses information internally, usually expressed as four numbers [x-x-x-xx], the lower the numbers the faster the access times). Different theories place more or less importance on these two determinants (see chapter 6 for more details).
stonedzenDiagramOCN-1.png?t=1295770563


Chapter 5: Methods of Overclocking, Multipliers vs. Ref-Clock

There are two general methods you can use to overclock your system: Multipliers and Reference Clock.

Multipliers: Overclocking using multipliers is the easiest method. Most bios have multipliers unlocked these days. Therefore, achieving a higher clock rate is simply a matter of increasing the CPU Multiplier and increasing voltage if there is instability. The CPU-NB can easily be overclocked the same way, increasing the CPU-NB Multiplier to achieve a higher clock rate on the chip, again, increasing voltage for stability.

Pros - Easy, very few factors to take into account when dealing with overclock-related crashes, doesn't affect RAM speed
Cons - Generally limited to 100mhz increments on CPU (and 200mhz increments on CPU-NB) thus not allowing you to squeeze that extra little bit of speed out of your system, does not allow as much customization of overall system speed, only an option on Black Edition chips

Ref-Clock: Overclocking using the Reference Clock can be pretty tricky, especially if you are new to overclocking. As mentioned before, increasing the Reference Clock will proportionally increase the bandwidth of all components in the computer. This is beneficial in that overall system communication increases equally. However, it is also confusing because you may find your system unstable and not know which chip or component is causing the crash. BSOD codes can often help you isolate the problem, but they are usually vague and unspecific. Using very small increases to the Reference Clock (and the occasional minor adjustment to your multipliers or RAM ratios for the sake of stability) is best when using this method.

Pros - Allows RAM overclock/underclock, increases whole system equally and proportionally (if multipliers are left untouched), allows small increases to clock speed that can lead to a slightly higher clock than using multipliers alone
Cons - Complicated, time consuming, difficult to stabilize


Chapter 6: Using Caution and Testing Often

Whatever your chosen method of overclocking, monitoring temperatures is an absolute must. First off, download Prime95 (32bit or 64bit). Then download 3DMark06, HWmonitor (or CoreTemp), CPU-Z, and GPU-Z. These programs will be your best friends when comparing your personal benchmarks and measuring success of an overclock attempt.

You will use Prime95 to test for system stability. The "Blend test" is my favorite since it tests both CPU and RAM though the "In-Place Large FFTs test" is good for testing your max CPU load temps. For all tests, I recommend a minimum of 20 minutes to an hour when testing a new overclock. However, once you have found the clock speed you want to keep 24/7, test it in the blender for at least 8 to 12 hours. If it reports no errors and does not lose a worker or BSOD after 12 hours then consider your rig stable.

You will want to find your chip's max safe temperature. The manufacturer will recommend a max safe temp, but do some research on your own and with your peers at OCN to find the max temp you are comfortable with. Generally with AMD, your fellow overclockers will tell you to stay considerably lower than the manufacturer recommends. I like to keep my 955 BE under 55c, even though it is technically safe up to 62c. Use HWmonitor or CoreTemp to watch your temps. Remember, temps "under load" refer to a full stress test, not your temps while gaming. Gaming temps will almost always be less then those under a true stress test.

Once you have found a stable overclock with safe temps, run a 3DMark06 benchmark (this is a free benchmark to try, but you can get 3DMarkVantage basic for $6.95, or advanced for $19.95). Take note of your score and run it again. After you run it two or three times, average the scores (score1+score2+score3)/3. Then, as you experiment with other methods of overclocking, repeat this process and compare the scores. Ask yourself, how much did my temps jump with the last increase? Is the performance gain worth it? Do I have more headroom to push further?

With time and practice, you will find that sweet spot that balances temps with overall clock speed and stability!


Chapter 7: RAM, Bandwidth vs. Timings

This chapter will be short as there is no real scientific answer for this question. Basically, there are two philosophies with overclocking RAM on an AMD platform. The first says that looser timings with a higher bandwidth yields better performance (ie 1600mhz and 8-8-8-24). The other says that slower bandwidth with tighter timings brings a better performance (ie 1333mhz and 6-6-6-21).

I have heard arguments for both sides and I refuse to say which is correct. However, I encourage you to experiment with both. If you have found a stable CPU and CPU-NB clock speed, then try pushing your bandwidth high and loosen your timings...then run a benchmark. Then slow your bandwidth and tighten your timings with another benchmark. See if you notice any difference and choose which method works best for your system.


Chapter 8: My Experiences with the 955 BE C2

Let me share my experiences with you via a slide show. Using the methods and knowledge mapped out in this guide I increased my CPU clock speed from 3.2ghz to 3.8ghz (a clock speed I have often been told is often impossible with the C2 revision of this chip). It is stable, never exceeds 58c in prime95, and games like I never imagined!


This is my computer at all stock settings.

3DMark06 score = 16,626

200x1616626.png


This is my system at stock speeds but with the video card overclocked to 800mhz core, 1600mhz shader, 2000mhz memory (which the card will stay at for the remaining tests).

3DMark06 score = 16,788

200x1616788vidoc.png


This one is an overclock of 3.8ghz on the CPU and 2600mhz CPU-NB using only multipliers, Reference Clock is at stock 200mhz and RAM is running stock 1600mhz 7-8-7-24.

3DMark06 score = 19,553

200x1919553.png


This one is an overclock of 3.8ghz on CPU and 2760mhz on the CPU-NB using a Reference Clock of 230mhz. RAM is underclocked due to instability over 1600mhz, but the timings are tightened to 6-6-6-21. Saw a small jump over the alternative 3.8ghz overclock shown above.

3DMark06 score = 19,635

230x16519635.png


This last one shows a 3.84ghz overclock with a 2796mhz CPU-NB, Reference Clock at 233mhz and RAM at 1242mhz 6-6-6-21. Temps were a little high for me.

3DMark06 score = 19,803

233x16519803.png

As of the fourth revision of this guide I have watercooled my system with the XSPC Rasa 240 kit and increased my overclock to 3.8ghz cpu, 2800mhz cpu-nb, and 1600mhz ram with 7-8-7-24 timings. Teamed with my video card (with Rasa GPU block) overclocked to 850 core, 1700 shader and 2000 memory, my score is a record high.

3DMark06 score = 20,365


Chapter 9: Conclusions


In my first revision of this guide I stated that I was in favor of overclocking via the Reference Clock because I was under the impression that the Front Side Bus was still the bus connecting the CPU and Northbridge, though I have since learned that the Hypertransport Link has taken its place. I still am in favor of an overclock based on the Reference Clock rather than multipliers alone, due to the fact it is more customizable and I was able to pull an extra 44mhz (and and additional 80 points in 3Dmark06) while still remaining stable. This is only my personal preference however and I encourage you to find which method fits your needs.

Remember, a good overclock can be frustrating to achieve and you may not be able to reach the clock speeds you want no matter what you do. Work within your systems limitations and mind your temps and volts. You should be able to pull a reasonable overclock out of any modern AMD chip. And who knows, you may get lucky and receive a chip that clocks way beyond its price point.

I could not stabilize more than 3.6ghz when I first started overclocking. I figured it was due to my chip being a C2 revision 955. Now with everything I've learned, I am running 3.8ghz stable 24/7 with safe temps and lightning fast performance, and all on a my rather tight budget.

Take your time, be patient, and move in small increments and always, always test as you go.

Hope you enjoyed this guide and thanks for reading. Please be kind and give Rep if this guide helped you...positive recognition teamed with constructive feedback and input keeps me coming back to make the guide even better. Thanks again and know that I am always willing to answer your PMs.

A guide by Ryan Horn

4th Revision updated on April 27th, 2011 for system overclock update and grammatical fixes, as well as some re-writing for the ease of understanding
Edited by stonedzen - 4/27/11 at 4:13pm
The Monolith
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II x4 955 BE C2 @ 3.84ghz (240x16, 1.47v) MSI GD70-790FX, IMC @ 2640mhz (240x16, 1.3v) Gigabyte GTX460 OC 1GB GDDR5 850-1700-2000 1.025v 8gb G.Skill Ripjaw DDR3-1600 cl 7-8-7-24-1t, 1.65v 
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(2) 1TB Samsung F3 Sony DVD/DVR/CDR Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit Viewsonic 22" widescreen 5ms 
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The Monolith
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(2) 1TB Samsung F3 Sony DVD/DVR/CDR Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit Viewsonic 22" widescreen 5ms 
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post #2 of 32
Very nice guide! It should help a lot of beginners out there.
1155 POWER
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i5 2500k 4,6Ghz Asus Maximus IV Extreme Palit GTX 560 Ti Sonic Gigabyte GTX 560 Ti Overclocked 
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8GB G.Skill Sniper 1886MHz Seagate 500GB and Samsung 500GB Samsung 840 SSD Corsair H50 
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AMD 955 BE Asus Crosshair Formula II nVidia GTX 260 Core 216 55nm Kingston DDR2 4GB 800Mhz 
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Western Digital 500GB Some cheap thing (at least it's black) Modded AMD Stock Cooler Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit 
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Some Samsung. Corsair CX600 NZXT Tempest A4Tech X7 
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Bundled Black Ops Mousepad lol 
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i5 2500k 4,6Ghz Asus Maximus IV Extreme Palit GTX 560 Ti Sonic Gigabyte GTX 560 Ti Overclocked 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveCooling
8GB G.Skill Sniper 1886MHz Seagate 500GB and Samsung 500GB Samsung 840 SSD Corsair H50 
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Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit BenQ XL2411Z Steelseries Merc Stealth Nox Apex 800w 
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Western Digital 500GB Some cheap thing (at least it's black) Modded AMD Stock Cooler Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit 
MonitorPowerCaseMouse
Some Samsung. Corsair CX600 NZXT Tempest A4Tech X7 
Mouse Pad
Bundled Black Ops Mousepad lol 
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Intel i5-4210H MSI MS-16GF GTX 850M 8GB DDR3 
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post #3 of 32
Nice guide
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post #4 of 32
Very nice guide. I recently just got my 4 GHz 955 C3 overclock stable; might need a bit of tweaking to increase some speeds and such but so far it is awesome. thumb.gif
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post #5 of 32
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the feedback so far guys, please feel free to point new members towards this guide. smile.gif
The Monolith
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Phenom II x4 955 BE C2 @ 3.84ghz (240x16, 1.47v) MSI GD70-790FX, IMC @ 2640mhz (240x16, 1.3v) Gigabyte GTX460 OC 1GB GDDR5 850-1700-2000 1.025v 8gb G.Skill Ripjaw DDR3-1600 cl 7-8-7-24-1t, 1.65v 
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The Monolith
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II x4 955 BE C2 @ 3.84ghz (240x16, 1.47v) MSI GD70-790FX, IMC @ 2640mhz (240x16, 1.3v) Gigabyte GTX460 OC 1GB GDDR5 850-1700-2000 1.025v 8gb G.Skill Ripjaw DDR3-1600 cl 7-8-7-24-1t, 1.65v 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
(2) 1TB Samsung F3 Sony DVD/DVR/CDR Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit Viewsonic 22" widescreen 5ms 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Belkin n52te and xGene Mini Cooler Master RS-500 Cooler Master 690 II Advanced Logitech G5 with Setpoint 
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RevolTec Precision Advanced Onboard 
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post #6 of 32
Thread Starter 
Bump for new revision of the guide.

As usual please provide feedback on this thread or PM me with questions. The more feedback I receive the better and more complete the next revision will be. Though it goes without saying, +rep is appreciated if you find this guide useful in your overclocking ventures.

Lastly, please link new AMD overclockers to this guide. I made it to help them and I want it to reach as many new OCN members as possible.

Thanks for the support and my best wishes to the OCN community! biggrin.gif


2nd Revision updated on January 19th, 2011 after additional research. Supplementary information added and some original information corrected. Some grammatical errors fixed as well.
The Monolith
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II x4 955 BE C2 @ 3.84ghz (240x16, 1.47v) MSI GD70-790FX, IMC @ 2640mhz (240x16, 1.3v) Gigabyte GTX460 OC 1GB GDDR5 850-1700-2000 1.025v 8gb G.Skill Ripjaw DDR3-1600 cl 7-8-7-24-1t, 1.65v 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
(2) 1TB Samsung F3 Sony DVD/DVR/CDR Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit Viewsonic 22" widescreen 5ms 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Belkin n52te and xGene Mini Cooler Master RS-500 Cooler Master 690 II Advanced Logitech G5 with Setpoint 
Mouse PadAudio
RevolTec Precision Advanced Onboard 
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Reply
The Monolith
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II x4 955 BE C2 @ 3.84ghz (240x16, 1.47v) MSI GD70-790FX, IMC @ 2640mhz (240x16, 1.3v) Gigabyte GTX460 OC 1GB GDDR5 850-1700-2000 1.025v 8gb G.Skill Ripjaw DDR3-1600 cl 7-8-7-24-1t, 1.65v 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
(2) 1TB Samsung F3 Sony DVD/DVR/CDR Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit Viewsonic 22" widescreen 5ms 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Belkin n52te and xGene Mini Cooler Master RS-500 Cooler Master 690 II Advanced Logitech G5 with Setpoint 
Mouse PadAudio
RevolTec Precision Advanced Onboard 
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post #7 of 32
Hi, just wanted to thank you for all the work you put into this guide!

I overclocked my cpu and searched all of the internet to find the best methods, but in your post I learned lots of new stuff that should help me get way better results.

Great post!!!
Pantoffeltower
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Pantoffeltower
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post #8 of 32
Great job writing this! +rep
    
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7-5820K Haswell-E Asus ROG Rampage V Extreme Intel X99 EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 FTW Corsair Vengeance Red LED 32GB (4x8GB) DDR4-300... 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Samsung 840 500GB SSD (SATA-6Gbps) Western Digital Black 1TB 64MB Cache HDD (SATA-... Western Digital Black 4TB 64MB Cache HDD (SATA-... NZXT Kraken X52 & 2x Corsair SP120 RGB 120mm Fa... 
CoolingCoolingCoolingOS
EVGA ACX 3.0 (Graphics Card) 4x Corsair SP120 RGB 120mm Case Fans IC Diamond 7 Carat Thermal Compound Microsoft Windows 10 Home 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
LG Flatron 34UM95-P 34" 3440x1440 21:9 IPS SteelSeries Apex 350 Low Profile RGB EVGA SuperNova G2 1000W Modular Corsair Crystal 570X RGB 
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Logitech G502 Proteus Core ModMyMachine SlamePad Aluminium Magnum Champagne Creative Labs Sound Blaster ZxR 2x Acoustic Energy Aego M 2.1 Speakers & 1 Cent... 
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post #9 of 32
nice tutorial. si have the c3 and i am still at stock speeds waiting on my Corsair A70 cooler to arrive
)-(4v0c
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)-(4v0c
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post #10 of 32
Great guide, but you're going to want to add in a write-up about the importance of pairing 125W processors with a reliable power phase & mosfet cooling, especially for overclocking.
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