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Which Linux for playing with Networking?

post #1 of 34
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I'm really interested in playing with networking on Linux, and I want to maybe play around with a web server and some other stuff on it. A lot of people on here say Ubuntu is bloated and not a good choice, I'm not totally new to Linux, but I definitely don't understand the inner working of it, so I'm not really up for compiling my own OS or anything like that. But yeah any help would be appreciated.
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Pride and Joy
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post #2 of 34
Any.
Ubuntu/Debian are probably the easiest ones to get going.

"sudo apt-get install apache2"
Bam, webserver installed, etc.
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post #3 of 34
Depends on what you plan to do with it.

BackTrack is great if you're trying to learn about networks and network security stuff.
    
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post #4 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by W4LNUT5 View Post
Depends on what you plan to do with it.

BackTrack is great if you're trying to learn about networks and network security stuff.
Backtrack is possibly the worst distribution of Linux to start out with. It's built on top of Ubuntu but an absolute nightmare for entry level Linux users, it doesn't even have networking enabled by default. I'd stick with beer's suggestion. Ubuntu is heavily supported, and a nice distribution to get acquainted with Linux.
post #5 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by seekrit View Post
Backtrack is possibly the worst distribution of Linux to start out with. It's built on top of Ubuntu but an absolute nightmare for entry level Linux users, it doesn't even have networking enabled by default. I'd stick with beer's suggestion. Ubuntu is heavily supported, and a nice distribution to get acquainted with Linux.
I said it depends on what he's going to do with it. If he wants to run packet sniffers and such and learn about networking and security, Backtrack is a great choice out of the box.

I specifically said "if you plan to learn about..." I did not run out and say it was the best to get a newbie started as an every day distro.

If he only wants to play with a LAMP, then anything else will do. I didn't bother stating this, because I expected the OP to comment and clarify what exactly it is he plans to do with it.
    
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post #6 of 34
I read clearly what you wrote. Backtrack is not a beginners distribution, in fact it's often expressed not to be used by novice level Linux users. There is no community support outside of the OSCP fourms which is locked and only for enrolled members.

I don't see why you need to get defensive. Everything Backtrack has can be ran on Ubuntu.
post #7 of 34
I started playing with Unix around 3 years ago, and I can tell you I still have a ton to learn about it. After playing with Ubunt, BSD, Reahat, and Suse, Ubuntu is the easiest to get started with. You deffently don't want something that is to difficult because you don't want to get discuraged, and turn away from it all together like I did years ago.

I have read Ubuntu is the fastest growing version of Linux out there. This is good for a beginner because you are going to be spending a good deal of your time with google trying to find out how to do things. There will be other people that have already posted on how to do something you are currently trying to do.

I also found installing applications is the easist in Ubuntu. Use their package system so it will also download all the dependancies you will need.
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post #8 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by seekrit View Post
Backtrack is possibly the worst distribution of Linux to start out with. It's built on top of Ubuntu but an absolute nightmare for entry level Linux users, it doesn't even have networking enabled by default. I'd stick with beer's suggestion. Ubuntu is heavily supported, and a nice distribution to get acquainted with Linux.
First distro i ever installed was BT. Your statement is false. Clicking "start network" in start menu is absolutely not nightmarish.
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post #9 of 34
Ubuntu is easy, and the things that are not needed/wanted are so easy to get rid of.
Just click on the "Remove" button in the software center, type in your password, and it will remove all of it including dependencies.
Like previously posted, to get Apache...easy stuff.
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post #10 of 34
I'd say the best way to get started with networking in Linux is to play with two or more Linux boxes that you can try to get talking to each other. Since that isn't always an option I'd say run Linux VMs. Try to get VMs to talk to the host. Try to get VMs to talk to other VMs. Expand to multiple subnets and so on..
I don't really have a distro recommendation. They should all get the job done. You just need a clear goal of your design.
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