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Choose some new distros for me

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Boxing week sale SSD will arrive soon and so this Intel will migrate to my laptop, so they will both be cleared out.

So basically I will be tri-booting 2 linux distros with Win 7. Ubuntu is too easy to get away from using terminal and I need to learn more. Choose a couple for me that will be a little more hands on that will kind of force me to learn more bash, yet still be reasonable to operate. Large support community is a must as lots of things are still c/p for me.

Thinking of Fedora, SUSE or whatever. No specific requirements, as long as I can get on the net easy and there is flash video and codec support for movies. Just looking for something new to play around with.

I like GRUB so I will need something similar to handle the boot loader for me.

If you recommend a distro, please specify some recommended partitions like swap, / , home that may be needed if the installer does not make it easy. Have already downloaded a bunch that are 64 bit, so let me know if 32 bit is better for your distro recommendation (not worried about a buggy distro, unless it is really bad with reboots and crashes)

TLDR: sick of Ubuntu, want to try a couple of others that are similar but more hands on.

Thanks.
post #2 of 24
Arch Linux. Fedora and SUSE aren't that different from Debian, and Debian is just Ubuntu sans-bull****, so you aren't going to learn much more from it.

Arch is the next logical step from Ubuntu. If you don't like Ubuntu, and Arch still looks scary, then you probably aren't ready to move on. Maybe try switching to Linux Mint.

It works best if you have access to another computer. Just have the Arch wiki open at all times and you can't go wrong.

If it helps though you can choose a preconfigured Arch-based distro, like ArchBang or Chakra



Oh, and InB4 Greetz
    
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post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I will try Mint and Arch. I guess I did not rally need that much crap in the OP.

Basically just looking for the gradual stepping stones in going from Ubuntu to full terminal use. Now I kind of like the idea of having one hard to learn distro in the mix as it will help me see where my knowledge gaps are.
post #4 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathris View Post
Arch Linux. Fedora and SUSE aren't that different from Debian, and Debian is just Ubuntu sans-bull****, so you aren't going to learn much more from it.

Arch is the next logical step from Ubuntu. If you don't like Ubuntu, and Arch still looks scary, then you probably aren't ready to move on. Maybe try switching to Linux Mint.

It works best if you have access to another computer. Just have the Arch wiki open at all times and you can't go wrong.

If it helps though you can choose a preconfigured Arch-based distro, like ArchBang or Chakra



Oh, and InB4 Greetz
Ummm Debian is not Ubuntu crap it's what Ubuntu came from. It's one of the longest running distributions out there. No offense but you can't even begin to compare Debian with Ubuntu. Arch is good, but it's far from "advanced", it's just a little more specific on dependencies and that's it.

[edit] OP: No offense, but no matter what dependency based distro you choose it's going to be virtually the same. You use some form of cli to install your packages (or GUI) and do minor configuration editing. If you want to do things a more advanced way you need to branch into something more like gentoo/slack, but then your just spending too much time in compile. If you really want new experiences stop using your package manager and start compiling things yourself. Arch won't bring you any "closer" unless you start modifying AUR packages, but then you might as well just download the original source and compile it yourself, you'll learn much more.

[edit] Also, doing things like moving files, renaming them, learning the different cli commands will also help you be more "comfortable"
Edited by mushroomboy - 1/1/11 at 9:57pm
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post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mushroomboy View Post
Ummm Debian is not Ubuntu crap it's what Ubuntu came from. It's one of the longest running distributions out there. No offense but you can't even begin to compare Debian with Ubuntu. Arch is good, but it's far from "advanced", it's just a little more specific on dependencies and that's it.



Basically, if you want to learn Linux, stay away from Ubuntu. They've messed up so much stuff that I hesitate to even call it Linux anymore. It would be like saying "I want to learn FreeBSD, so I'm going to go check out OSX"
    
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post #6 of 24
fedora is very clean cut and awsome. Definitely what your looking for.
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post #7 of 24
Greetz
While I wholeheartedly agree that Debian is more serious than Ubuntu and is an apples and oranges comparison, I have some contention regarding Slackware statements/concerns. It is rather easy to run Slackware and never have to compile from source. Numerous programs like Slackpack can strip a deb or rpm and create a Slack package as well as create a package from source. The community is so big and so supportive (and also so expert in general) that SlackBuilds are available from the community for almost everything.

That said compiling from source is only viewed as a hassle by people hobbled by auto dependency resolving systems. I say hobbled because in order to support automatic dependency resolving the system has to become more complex and so altered that you become tied to repositories if you want to stay safe and not break your system. If you stray too far from official repositories or desire to install even one program from source it can upset the applecart and cause a breakdown and it gets worse with every one you install from source.

Conversely with Slack there is no waiting on anyone else to build a package when something new or from a really small niche comes out. You get to install whatever you want, whenever you want with no fear of ever breaking anything. It's a privilege not a burden.

For example I am presently trying to install E17 (which went fine a few months ago on Slack v13.1) but having some trouble on the bleeding edge Slackware Current which is essentially a beta/testing release. I am quite certain that if I chose to install it all individually from source it would be no big deal. However I chose to use the total install script, "easy-e17.sh" from SVN which changes from day to day. So what doesn't work today may well work tomorrow. It happens with SVN all the time. It is a bit of a hassle but the payoff is I will have the absolute latest code when it finishes and all I had to do was run a single script and go eat lunch and see if it went in or where it stopped. If it stops I just re-run tomorrow at lunchtime.

Her's the kicker. Even with an unattended install script like this it is impossible to break the system either now or as a consequence down the road when some dependency resolver rings alarm bells and tries to alter things. It just cannot happen. That is priceless and the effort to have it is trivial.
Edited by enorbet2 - 1/2/11 at 12:33am
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post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Ummm Debian is not Ubuntu crap it's what Ubuntu came from.
That is what got out of what he said. That they are the same family but Ubuntu adds all the extra "easy to use extras".

Quote:
[edit] OP: No offense, but no matter what dependency based distro you choose it's going to be virtually the same.
I did do some X vs Y vs Z for myself and also found this distro timeline chart (56K Warning) and it basically sums up (from what I get out of it anyway) that the main families of Linux are Debian, Slack/ SuSE, and Red Hat. But after that it gets quite overwhelming once it branches out. Even if they happen to be similar minus the differences they may have, I would like to try out some others before getting too accustomed to anything in particular in case I end up liking something else better. I do have a bunch downloaded already that I could just install, but was just looking for what you guys recommend, that may save some time/hassle.

Quote:
[edit] Also, doing things like moving files, renaming them, learning the different cli commands will also help you be more "comfortable"
Every time I think about learning more cli bash, it seems to come back that this is what I need to be doing more of. I like tweaking but don't even know enough programming to even fail at doing it (I guess it is possible to fail at failing, or does a double fail=a win, ah never mind).

So far I learn the most from getting a new distro installed and set up because it is what gets me the most motivated to learn. Going to have to look into some course directive because my Linux knowledge gaps tend to sidetrack my progress.

Thanks for the info and insight so far.
post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zelix View Post
fedora is very clean cut and awsome. Definitely what your looking for.
thank you. I need to start with something more clean so that I can focus more on the things that I need to learn and not learning the extras that take that away, just not so much taken away that I get lost. I have read about Fedora and it does sound like one of the ways to go from where I am at.

Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post
Greetz

That said compiling from source is only viewed as a hassle by people hobbled by auto dependency resolving systems. I say hobbled because in order to support automatic dependency resolving the system has to become more complex and so altered that you become tied to repositories if you want to stay safe and not break your system. If you stray too far from official repositories or desire to install even one program from source it can upset the applecart and cause a breakdown and it gets worse with every one you install from source.
I liked this whole post, but this is the part I am going to make a goal for. It sounds still far off from where I am at, but it sounds like where I would like to be.
post #10 of 24
I think enorbet must have had some really traumatic experience with repositories in the past.

While there is some truth to what he said, the problem is very rare. Saying that auto-dependency based distros have such problems is like saying Windows gets viruses. The only distro that has issues is Ubuntu, because they like to rename everything and modify core packages, but like I said before, I don't really consider it Linux anymore.

The amount of time it takes to fix any dependency issues is around 1/100th the time it takes to manually manage every last dependency a piece of software has.
    
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