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post #21 of 30
In response to your vreg-PWM question:
Neither of the terms vreg or PWM refer to actual components. Vreg(voltage regulation/regulator) refers to a group of components on the board responsible for taking the 12V power from your power supply and regulating it to the proper voltage for your CPU. PWM(pulse width modulation) is a technique of performing this regulation. Essentially what is happening is the MOSFETs pulse the 12V input through the inductors such that you get something like 1.2V out of the inductors(whatever voltage you set in the BIOS).

On this motherboard, the MOSFETs are the little black chips between the capacitors near the CPU socket. Look at the picture you posted- start at the 12V atx 4-pin socket and so straight down. You'll see cap-cap-mosfet-cap-mosfet-mosfet-cap. The four gray squares just to the left of all that are the inductors which will probably need a little extra cooling if you overclock. There's a fourth MOSFET above the line of inductors. Also, there are more MOSFETs on the back of the motherboard( at least on the A-E revision I have, which like yours did not come with the extra heatsinks on the voltage regulation components). I also just noticed there is another inductor and MOSFET between the southbridge and CPU socket.

The tiny little Zotac heatsink on the southbridge shouldn't get too warm (as others have said) and you definitely should not have to replace that.

The issue with the MOSFETs isn't that they get too hot(supposedly they do get toasty if you run a quad with this board), but rather that they tend to explode when you surpass their rated current. You can cool the MOSFET all you like, but I don't think that will prevent it from blowing when you draw too much current.

You should be warned that when MOSFETs fail, they tend to short internally. This means you'll be feeding 12V to your CPU and you'll be out a motherboard and a processor. Possibly more.

The reviews I read of the A-E said they couldn't push past 160 bclk, and the motherboard was only stable up to 150 bclk. You're also missing a lot of voltage control in the BIOS. I'm surprised you were even able to get to 3.6ghz.

If you're serious about overclocking, I think you're either going to have to get a soldering iron and perform some serious hard mods(i.e. replace all the vreg components and figure out some volt mods), or find a mini-itx board that can actually overclock. Since I'm guessing you're not an electrical engineer, you'll probably want to take the second option.
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post #22 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpz View Post
In response to your vreg-PWM question:
Neither of the terms vreg or PWM refer to actual components. Vreg(voltage regulation/regulator) refers to a group of components on the board responsible for taking the 12V power from your power supply and regulating it to the proper voltage for your CPU. PWM(pulse width modulation) is a technique of performing this regulation. Essentially what is happening is the MOSFETs pulse the 12V input through the inductors such that you get something like 1.2V out of the inductors(whatever voltage you set in the BIOS).

On this motherboard, the MOSFETs are the little black chips between the capacitors near the CPU socket. Look at the picture you posted- start at the 12V atx 4-pin socket and so straight down. You'll see cap-cap-mosfet-cap-mosfet-mosfet-cap. The four gray squares just to the left of all that are the inductors which will probably need a little extra cooling if you overclock. There's a fourth MOSFET above the line of inductors. Also, there are more MOSFETs on the back of the motherboard( at least on the A-E revision I have, which like yours did not come with the extra heatsinks on the voltage regulation components). I also just noticed there is another inductor and MOSFET between the southbridge and CPU socket.

The tiny little Zotac heatsink on the southbridge shouldn't get too warm (as others have said) and you definitely should not have to replace that.

The issue with the MOSFETs isn't that they get too hot(supposedly they do get toasty if you run a quad with this board), but rather that they tend to explode when you surpass their rated current. You can cool the MOSFET all you like, but I don't think that will prevent it from blowing when you draw too much current.

You should be warned that when MOSFETs fail, they tend to short internally. This means you'll be feeding 12V to your CPU and you'll be out a motherboard and a processor. Possibly more.

The reviews I read of the A-E said they couldn't push past 160 bclk, and the motherboard was only stable up to 150 bclk. You're also missing a lot of voltage control in the BIOS. I'm surprised you were even able to get to 3.6ghz.

If you're serious about overclocking, I think you're either going to have to get a soldering iron and perform some serious hard mods(i.e. replace all the vreg components and figure out some volt mods), or find a mini-itx board that can actually overclock. Since I'm guessing you're not an electrical engineer, you'll probably want to take the second option.
jpz, that totally answered my questions about this board. Now i'm simply afraid to give it more volts even IF it can take it temp wise!

You are correct my field is mechanical and although it does sound fun to do the modding and i think i could do it with a lot of help, trial, error and board burning i'd be better off finding a solid overclocker itx board.

i'll have the extra cooling in place on the mosfets and hopefully that will help a little bit at least - not sure how to get those little heat sinks installed under the board though. I should be able to report max oc resluts on air with stock cooler and if it gets way to hot but can easily reach solid clocks then i'll order the water cooling kit, but from what you guys told me its just not the right board and wont be temp limited anyway. damn, i'm glad i consulted here first. pics coming by Friday with clocks and benches.. maybe i'll have the fastest h55 3dmark 11 score? hahaha
Edited by twistedneck - 1/3/11 at 12:55am
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post #23 of 30
Thread Starter 
The new H55 sandy bridge pics just came out and you can see they have added heat sinc's around the vrm areas. See below pic new sandy board is on the right, i circled the parts on the current A-E board (left) in green that i believe have been covered by a heat sinc in the new design.

Can you guys comment on what these little components are, and if you think i will help this board remain cool by placing heat sinc's on this instead of the mosfets? I wonder why they added this heat sinc to the new board?



Thank you
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post #24 of 30
Those are the mofsets! The voltage regulator portion of the motherboard is a combination of those capacitors and the actual VRM chips.
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post #25 of 30
As charliehorse55 said, those are MOSFETs circled in the picture. The new 1155 board still has three MOSFETs on the back which have no cooling according to the pictures on Zotac's website.
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post #26 of 30
devil can you link to some pics of your build or a worklog if you have one. Im gonna put my mini itx under water and am using different components but i would love to see yours
    
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post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by cj3waker View Post
devil can you link to some pics of your build or a worklog if you have one. Im gonna put my mini itx under water and am using different components but i would love to see yours
Lost my camera ATM but I'm waiting on a shipment from Performance-PCs with a bunch of odds and ends I need to finish my build which should be here on Monday, and everything should be finished soon afterwards; I'll borrow a mate's cam if I don't end up finding mine.

But with the behemoth 140 x 3 radiator (with shrouds on both sides and push-pull fan configuration), it definitely isn't going to be some awesome internal-mounted Q08 or SG05 setup. I was mostly after semi-portability and extreme silence. And extreme performance I guess.
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post #28 of 30
aha i see, thats pretty cool. im going to be all internal but to each his own. a few quick disconnects wouldnt be too bad though
    
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post #29 of 30
Thread Starter 
FYI - here is the board w/o water. As made clear by everyone here this board does not overheat at all even on air and there is no way to clock the h55 itx zotac beyond qpi of 3.9 or 4.0 ghz at peak voltage - turning ram down does not seem to help.

the mosfets are not overheating at 4.0ghz, 3.8qpi, 1750 ram, oh and the 6950 unlocked shader board is just hanging on by the pci slot and a stick of metal i put on the front bracket since this spider mini itx board does not have any way to mount a video card. the power supply is also way to huge its a 700w cougar and combed with the heavy video board the legs are collapsing.

its fast as hell though, and if you can come up w/ any overclocking ideas i'll try em. so far cpu is under 45C even during burn tests and encoding videos.





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post #30 of 30
I love how awkward yet awesome that bench is.
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