Overclock.net › Forums › Consumer Electronics › Photography › Beginner DSLR
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Beginner DSLR

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I plan on start learning photography, at the moment I know very little about it.

So, what camera/glass would you recommend for someone in my position?

I don't have a fixed budget, I just would like something that would allow me to learn and not limit me very much for the new few years, no need for much more than that.

I've been thinking about getting the Nikon D90, I know the d7000 is out and its a overall improved version, but I suppose it will take some time(years?) for me to actually start noticing those differences.

About the lens, I'm between those two:
AF-S VR DX 18-105mm 3.5-5.6G
AF-S DX VR 18-55mm 3.5-5.6g

Plz advise me.
post #2 of 13
I'd focus on the lenses first, not the body. Buying a cheaper body would leave you more money for your lenses, which add better image quality and flexibility to your photography.

Any particular reason why you're going Nikon?

I'd recommend a D3100 if you're going Nikon with the 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 VR first, then from there add on lenses as you see fit through your own personal experience with photography. It's hard to get a gauge of what lenses you'll need first before taking photos.
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by r31ncarnat3d View Post
I'd focus on the lenses first, not the body. Buying a cheaper body would leave you more money for your lenses, which add better image quality and flexibility to your photography.

Any particular reason why you're going Nikon?

I'd recommend a D3100 if you're going Nikon with the 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 VR first, then from there add on lenses as you see fit through your own personal experience with photography. It's hard to get a gauge of what lenses you'll need first before taking photos.
Agreed. Except for things like build quality, amount of menu diving, and the built-in focus motor, I'd take the D3100 over the D90 when first starting out.

With the difference in price, you could easily pick up the 35 f/1.8 or 55-200 VR (or 55-300 VR...) in addition to the basic kit.
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Wont the lens be more expensive for the d3100?
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firanford View Post
Wont the lens be more expensive for the d3100?
Not necessarily. The D3100 lacks the in-body autofocus motor so it can't autofocus with AF lenses and only can autofocus with AF-S lenses, but even then AF-S lenses are pretty cheap.

If you want to check it out, the two most often bought beginner lenses for Nikon are the AF-S 35mm f/1.8 and AF-S 55-200mm VR, which are still relatively cheap prices.

Most new lenses are AF-S anyways, and AF is generally for either very cheap or old lenses (not to say that old=bad, since a lot of old glass is still superb, but I don't think you'd be interested in the older lens models )
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks, very helpful. One thing I forgot to mention is that I'm from Brazil and I'm going to buy the camera in Europe, which is about 50% cheaper than in Brazil, so I don't know when will be my next opportunity to buy another camera.

The option to buy used/older lenses is something I think might make it considerably easier to buy lenses here.

1080p is good, but 720p is enough for what I will use it for.

Ok, I take the D90 has better picture quality, am I right?
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firanford View Post
Thanks, very helpful. One thing I forgot to mention is that I'm from Brazil and I'm going to buy the camera in Europe, which is about 50% cheaper than in Brazil, so I don't know when will be my next opportunity to buy another camera.

The option to buy used/older lenses is something I think might make it considerably easier to buy lenses here.

1080p is good, but 720p is enough for what I will use it for.

Ok, I take the D90 has better picture quality, am I right?
Nope, the same picture quality. Truth be told, Any of the cropped cameras (Canon 1000D, 500D, 550D, Nikon D3100, D7000, D90) have very similar picture quality. This is because they all use the same sized sensor within the cameras. The only differences are extremely minute, and have to do with high ISO noise (which only affects ISO1600+ really). Even then, like I said, it's a small difference.

If you'd notice, I left the D3000 out because unlike those other cameras that use CMOS sensors, it uses a CCD sensor so it's more prone to image noise than the others. That's pretty much the only exception.

So unless you're planning to blow up your pictures to large proportions or you're OCD enough to be bothered by small differences in noise while magnifying your image, I'm very certain that you won't notice any differences in picture quality.

And as far as I know, all video cameras from Canon and Nikon are capable of both 1080p and 720p. I can't think of any camera that doesn't have 1080p, really. Consider it a bonus add-on
post #8 of 13
The older Nikons only do 720p -D90, D5000, and the D3S. Only the D3100 and D7000 do 1080p currently.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Ok here are the prices:
d90 + AF-S DX VR 18-55mm 3.5-5.6g €798
d3100 + AF-S DX VR 18-55mm 3.5-5.6g €528

If I go with the d3100, I'll take the money from the difference and get a second lenses. I'm thinking about the following:

AF-S VR DX 55-200mm (€182)
Nikon AF-S DX 35 milÃ*metros 1.8G 172 (for €172)
AF-S 50mm 1.4G (for €319)

I could squeeze a AF 50mm 1.8D (for €121) if I chose the D90.
Edited by Firanford - 1/9/11 at 6:00pm
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firanford View Post
Ok here are the prices:
d90 + AF-S DX VR 18-55mm 3.5-5.6g €798
d3100 + AF-S DX VR 18-55mm 3.5-5.6g €528

If I go with the d3100, I'll take the money from the difference and get a second lenses. I'm thinking about the following:

Nikon AF-S DX 35 milÃ*metros 1.8G 172 (for €172)
AF-S 50mm 1.4G (for €319)

I could squeeze a AF 50mm 1.8D (for €121) if I chose the D90.
Out of curiosity, what are your plans for the 50mm f/1.4?

In my experience, 50mm f/1.4 is great for portraits because of how nice the bokeh and depth of field is, but I find it to be a bit tight for indoor shots in small rooms (think your typical dorm room). However, in the streets of San Francisco it serves me very well, giving me a nice focal length for city photography.

Between those two lenses, I'd grab one based on your focal length needs.

On a side note, what's with the "G"? Is it how f-stops are denoted in a different language (all I can tell is that it's a Romantic language)?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Photography
Overclock.net › Forums › Consumer Electronics › Photography › Beginner DSLR