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Linux Server Motherboard Replacement

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
My father's company uses a server based on Linux as a server for a MySQL database. It was presenting issues with the video card and was low on memory so he bought another motherboard with onboard video and 2x2GB DDR3 RAM.

I substituted the motherboard, but I didn't know I'd have to install drivers for the two network cards (I think that's what they are, both have one internet port on it) to have it available.

I need help with possibly recompiling the Linux version (it's using Debian right now) without loosing the database.

Can anyone help me? I know little about Linux, but I want to fix the server and have it available to his offices ASAP.
post #2 of 22
That's really going to be a lot of work, not doing the work but explaining the work. First off, you don't re-compile linux, but that really doesn't matter as you just need the fix. What you should do is export the database, the entire database, and save that somewhere safe. I'd say export it to the HDD as a file and then transfer it somewhere safe for now, such as another HDD/flash drive/whatever can store it safely. Then you want to scrap everything and re-install linux on it, whatever flavor, and follow a tutorial. What was the SQL DB for? Was it running a http/php server, a LAMP setup? If it was just for SQL then you just follow a tutorial installing Debian/Fedora and mySQL. To install linux, just insert disc and follow instructions. If you get confused, well if you get confused you probably shouldn't be trying this. It's seriously extremely simple and well explained on most installers, you shouldn't get lost. As far as SQL?

http://ariejan.net/2007/12/12/how-to...-ubuntudebian/

I prefer Debian (not ubuntu) for servers, and honestly you can use the internet for finding any tutorial.

Don't take offense to this, but if you are uncomfortable without a GUI you might not want to do this. While you can do a lot of SQL work without a GUI, most tutorials are going to explain it in ways that make you use CLI. That's just how a lot of server work goes, you don't use a GUI, this isn't the task for the weak hearted. Even more so since this is something where data loss is not an option, you really should be comfortable with the tools you will be using.

[edit] I say debian/fedora because those are the most stable server settings around. Well, RedHat, but that is fedora. CentOS is used for companies a lot but it isn't as solid for server work like Debian/Fedora. That is just my opinion.
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post #3 of 22
Greetz
If all you are needing to do at this point is get the nics working you may not have to do much at all. The very first thing to do is run "lspci" as root to find out what brand and model the nics are. It may be as simple as a modprobe or downloading and installing a driver module.

If you don't know what I mean by "run as root" you may need some realtime help. But first post here either the model(s) nics or the entire output of "lspci". Regardless though, mushroomboy gave you good advice re: backing up such important data as it is a must no matter what else you attempt.

However, mushroomboy, if you think Debian is a more stable platform for servers than Slackware, you really need to install it yourself and actually "have the lights go on".
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post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post
Greetz
If all you are needing to do at this point is get the nics working you may not have to do much at all. The very first thing to do is run "lspci" as root to find out what brand and model the nics are. It may be as simple as a modprobe or downloading and installing a driver module.

If you don't know what I mean by "run as root" you may need some realtime help. But first post here either the model(s) nics or the entire output of "lspci". Regardless though, mushroomboy gave you good advice re: backing up such important data as it is a must no matter what else you attempt.

However, mushroomboy, if you think Debian is a more stable platform for servers than Slackware, you really need to install it yourself and actually "have the lights go on".
Debian and Fedora were built for server maintenance and stability. I'm not saying slackware isn't, but if an update comes out and breaks he will have much more work as opposed to a system that's built not to break. That's why Debian/Fedora are used, because they are well tested and easy to maintain. This isn't a situation where we have the time to set up a slackware system. I respect slackware, but it's not server material, not in the sense that you need something easily maintained and reliable. That's what a server should be, to minimize downtime.

To the OP: He is right, if it is just getting network cards up and running. But I'm guessing you haven't gotten the database transferred either? Nor have you set up the database for the new machine? If you have gotten Debian installed you should have both cards automatically working, if not you will have to find out what they are and what drivers they need. Just skip the installing linux part. =P As for finding out what cards they are: lspci
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post #5 of 22
You most likely need to reassign labels too so that the new NICs match their intended configurations.

In Gentoo this is in
Code:
/etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules
Where you can set what NICs get what label by their MAC address.

I don't really know how Debian handles it.

All of this doesn't sound like a good idea to me at all to be honest. Working on a business oriented server without knowing very much about it or the OS that it runs on...No offense but I would not touch it if I were you.
post #6 of 22
I would mysqldump the database and get a backup before ANYTHING is done with the hardware at all. You will find out, you can blow any server up all day without a problem if you have a reliable backup. Without a backup, you are up the creek.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/mysqldump.html

or any other means of backup that may be in place.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mushroomboy;11965721 
Debian and Fedora were built for server maintenance and stability. I'm not saying slackware isn't, but if an update comes out and breaks he will have much more work as opposed to a system that's built not to break. That's why Debian/Fedora are used, because they are well tested and easy to maintain. This isn't a situation where we have the time to set up a slackware system. I respect slackware, but it's not server material, not in the sense that you need something easily maintained and reliable. That's what a server should be, to minimize downtime.

To the OP: He is right, if it is just getting network cards up and running. But I'm guessing you haven't gotten the database transferred either? Nor have you set up the database for the new machine? If you have gotten Debian installed you should have both cards automatically working, if not you will have to find out what they are and what drivers they need. Just skip the installing linux part. =P As for finding out what cards they are: lspci

This was not just built, I simply exchanged the motherboard. The database should be untouched and so I just need to get the NIC's up. I'm not exactly sure how to install the drivers either. Should I just navigate to the file and "execute" it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by evermooingcow;11965838 
You most likely need to reassign labels too so that the new NICs match their intended configurations.

In Gentoo this is in
Code:
/etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules
Where you can set what NICs get what label by their MAC address.

I don't really know how Debian handles it.

All of this doesn't sound like a good idea to me at all to be honest. Working on a business oriented server without knowing very much about it or the OS that it runs on...No offense but I would not touch it if I were you.

Thanks for the tip, I'll try this tomorrow morning. I know it isn't a good idea, but my father needs this server up ASAP and we don't know any technicians who know their way around Linux. He brought the server from one office to another for it to be closer to us in case there are any problems. The previous technician in charge was crap and charged way too much.

First of all I'll do the MySQL dump then get the drivers for the NIC's and go from there.
post #8 of 22
@mushroomboy There is no way an update can break a Slackware system because it does not resolve dependencies and because it doesn't it is considerably simpler and cleaner. That's the admin's job.

This is in no way intended to be any kind of distro war on my part but I simply could not let

" I respect slackware, but it's not server material, not in the sense that you need something easily maintained and reliable. "

just slide. I used Debian Lenny for more than a year regularly, so I know Debian is capable as a server. However I can tell you've never used Slackware because in that area you don't know what you're talking about.

This matters little to this thread so I'll stop defending Slackware now and reaffirm that Debian will do just fine. Open a terminal, even if you have to run a LiveCD to boot a system, and login as root and run the command we both mentioned, lspci.
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post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolonger View Post
This was not just built, I simply exchanged the motherboard. The database should be untouched and so I just need to get the NIC's up. I'm not exactly sure how to install the drivers either. Should I just navigate to the file and "execute" it?

Thanks for the tip, I'll try this tomorrow morning. I know it isn't a good idea, but my father needs this server up ASAP and we don't know any technicians who know their way around Linux. He brought the server from one office to another for it to be closer to us in case there are any problems. The previous technician in charge was crap and charged way too much.

First of all I'll do the MySQL dump then get the drivers for the NIC's and go from there.
Again. The backup is always first on any critical machine so it's a good thing you are doing that.

It is entirely possible, now that I am seeing that the system is a just a subbed motherboard and how little you know about Linux that you may not need drivers at all. If I am reading this and you right, they may already have a driver module loaded but not configured So here's what you do, again from command line terminal as root.

Type "ifconfig" (without the quotation marks) and it will list what, if any nics have been recognized and they will be listed as "eth0" and "eth1" most likely. If all you see reported is "lo" (which stands for "loopback") then drivers are not loaded.

Before I complicate things with configuration just first

1) get us the info on what brand/model nics
or the "lspci" output, and

2) the output for "ifconfig"

Then we can go from there. It won't take long at all if eth0 and eth1 are listed. but you will need to have some information about the network addresses used on the job at that time.
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post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post
@mushroomboy There is no way an update can break a Slackware system because it does not resolve dependencies and because it doesn't it is considerably simpler and cleaner. That's the admin's job.
That says it all. I'm not saying it will not work, but to minimize downtime for a major upgrade it is nice to have something do the dependencies. If it worked so well and easy you would think it would have a high market share for servers? Not to mention major known companies would use it. I'm not saying it's inferior as a distro, but it's not automatic enough to be used as a mainstream server. When something goes down you need it back up and running now, fast and clean. Now you could do disc images, and that will work, I'm pretty sure upgrading the entire network when the new version comes out will be a bit more of a hastle. No offense but configuring and maintaining something like Fedora/Debian vs Slackware is a completely different ballgame.

I mean you could use slackware, but then the problem becomes this: You will need to pay your admins more money, because they require more learning/experience. That will cost the company time and money now, which makes it even that much worse. So what do you do? You cut things in half and use something that can be set up in minutes as a server. That's the realistic view, it's not a distro war but corporate politics.

OP: lol I was under the impression for some reason you had two completely different computers and needed to set up the sever from scratch. Idk why I thought that, you also shouldn't have to dump the DB to a backup. Though dumping the DB is always a good idea from time to time. =P It's probably that the mac addresses were manually set up.

File:
/etc/network/interfaces

or:
https://www.debian-administration.org/articles/463

One of those solutions might help, I'm not sure.

[edit] I also forgot to mention major upgrades without doing a full distro upgrade. That could be a problem too as I'm sure an admin doesn't want to spend the time working on a cluster of servers updating the machines. Again you could just do one, make an image, and image the rest. You can do a build server, and run packages to the rest of them, but you still waste time on that build server. That's the advantage, updates are clean and easy. Especially when security is the #1 goal.
Edited by mushroomboy - 1/11/11 at 1:08pm
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