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post #741 of 976
Quote:
Originally Posted by deees View Post

Please critique my lighting, not my cabling.

In preparation for shooting my 800D, I’m using this 650D to learn how to handle the lighting/exposure settings. I can’t seem to find a balance between enough light to see the interior and not having excessive glare from the vertical surfaces. I’m not trying for dramatic, high contrast images. I’m trying for a more clinical, illustrative approach.

I spent some holiday gift cards and purchased some cheap soft boxes and adjustable reflectors. While the light kit is capable of ~22Kw, I’ve swap two of the bulbs with 15w ones in order to try to keep the light manageable. Even so, I’ve had to use the reflectors try to defuse the light. I also figured out how to position black panel in line-of-sight of the “mirror” surfaces, like the top of the HSF to reduce glare. (A skill I’m definitely going to need with the Silver Arrow cooler.)

At this point, I’ve gone as far as I think I can. Adjusting the shutter for longer exposures is just getting me washed out images and increased glare. Anyone have any suggestions?

Here is probably the “best” one I’ve managed to date, (out of ~300):



As a control, the same setup with “automatic settings”:



As criteria for success, these are the areas that I using to determine correct exposure:


For some reason, the pictures are too small, looks like you uploaded the thumbnails instead of the picture.
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Yep, Aeris died
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post #742 of 976
Quote:
Originally Posted by deees View Post

Please critique my lighting, not my cabling.

In preparation for shooting my 800D, I’m using this 650D to learn how to handle the lighting/exposure settings. I can’t seem to find a balance between enough light to see the interior and not having excessive glare from the vertical surfaces. I’m not trying for dramatic, high contrast images. I’m trying for a more clinical, illustrative approach.

I spent some holiday gift cards and purchased some cheap soft boxes and adjustable reflectors. While the light kit is capable of ~22Kw, I’ve swap two of the bulbs with 15w ones in order to try to keep the light manageable. Even so, I’ve had to use the reflectors try to defuse the light. I also figured out how to position black panel in line-of-sight of the “mirror” surfaces, like the top of the HSF to reduce glare. (A skill I’m definitely going to need with the Silver Arrow cooler.)

At this point, I’ve gone as far as I think I can. Adjusting the shutter for longer exposures is just getting me washed out images and increased glare. Anyone have any suggestions?

Here is probably the “best” one I’ve managed to date, (out of ~300):



As a control, the same setup with “automatic settings”:



As criteria for success, these are the areas that I using to determine correct exposure:


That picture looked better as an MMS wink.gif
post #743 of 976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nethermir View Post

For some reason, the pictures are too small, looks like you uploaded the thumbnails instead of the picture.

Thanks for pointing that out. I missed how the forum defaults to "import images" after preview. I didn't want to down-sample for the forum, but I also didn't want to post the full images. Should work now.
post #744 of 976
Quote:
Originally Posted by deees View Post

Please critique my lighting, not my cabling.

In preparation for shooting my 800D, I’m using this 650D to learn how to handle the lighting/exposure settings. I can’t seem to find a balance between enough light to see the interior and not having excessive glare from the vertical surfaces. I’m not trying for dramatic, high contrast images. I’m trying for a more clinical, illustrative approach.

I spent some holiday gift cards and purchased some cheap soft boxes and adjustable reflectors. While the light kit is capable of ~22Kw, I’ve swap two of the bulbs with 15w ones in order to try to keep the light manageable. Even so, I’ve had to use the reflectors try to defuse the light. I also figured out how to position black panel in line-of-sight of the “mirror” surfaces, like the top of the HSF to reduce glare. (A skill I’m definitely going to need with the Silver Arrow cooler.)

At this point, I’ve gone as far as I think I can. Adjusting the shutter for longer exposures is just getting me washed out images and increased glare. Anyone have any suggestions?

Here is probably the “best” one I’ve managed to date, (out of ~300):

capture00325.th.jpg

As a control, the same setup with “automatic settings”:

capture00326.th.jpg

As criteria for success, these are the areas that I using to determine correct exposure:

capture00285.th.jpg

I don't see any glare problem in these shots to be honest. Shiny stuff is supposed to look shiny wink.gif

I agree the darker area looks better at the brighter exposure, but the light stuff is overexposed at that level, especially the fan housings. There's basically two ways to approach that, either in-camera by tweaking the lighting, or in post via photoshop etc.

I'm not sure what instruments you're using but if there's an area where you want to bring up the exposure, try making a small rectangle of aluminum foil to reflect some light where you want it. If that's too harsh then try something white instead. You can make the card precisely the size you want to control how big an area it influences. It may take some creative thinking to get the card to stay exactly where you want it, assuming you don't have any grip equipment at hand. Similarly, you can place some black or otherwise opaque material (tape or black cards etc) in front of your light source to knock down a specific area. You've probably already noticed too, but sometimes changing the camera or subject angle relative to the light source by a very tiny amount can make a big difference in how the subject appears.

The other way to go is to do some photoshopping to adjust the levels in specific areas of the image, or do HDR or other combined bracketing.

Overall though those are very nice photos and the lighting looks good thumb.gif Can you post a wide shot of the entire setup?
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post #745 of 976
I agree with Threepi, keep up the good work, loving the intense commitment to perfection but the photos are good enough and the glare is something not even I would consider glare and I don't like any of my own work I get paid for I'm that critical of it.

Still, if it doesn't sit well with you then try post production or you may be in danger of not producing anything smile.gif - keep it up, looks great. is that a 650D? damn I need a new case.thumb.gif
post #746 of 976
Great advice man, just bummed about how I could've thought of this before :/ lol great work thumb.gif
post #747 of 976
Quote:
Originally Posted by threephi View Post

I don't see any glare problem in these shots to be honest. Shiny stuff is supposed to look shiny wink.gif

I agree the darker area looks better at the brighter exposure, but the light stuff is overexposed at that level, especially the fan housings. There's basically two ways to approach that, either in-camera by tweaking the lighting, or in post via photoshop etc.

I'm not sure what instruments you're using but if there's an area where you want to bring up the exposure, try making a small rectangle of aluminum foil to reflect some light where you want it. If that's too harsh then try something white instead. You can make the card precisely the size you want to control how big an area it influences. It may take some creative thinking to get the card to stay exactly where you want it, assuming you don't have any grip equipment at hand. Similarly, you can place some black or otherwise opaque material (tape or black cards etc) in front of your light source to knock down a specific area. You've probably already noticed too, but sometimes changing the camera or subject angle relative to the light source by a very tiny amount can make a big difference in how the subject appears.

The other way to go is to do some photoshopping to adjust the levels in specific areas of the image, or do HDR or other combined bracketing.

Overall though those are very nice photos and the lighting looks good thumb.gif Can you post a wide shot of the entire setup?

Thanks for the encouragement. I was concerned that I'd missed some obvious, (for a photographer), setting that would allow me to have more light with less glare.
I actually bought some 5-in-1 reflectors with stands that I been using to bounce the light from the softboxes. I clamped some black foam-core, strategically located, to try to cut some of the glare. I might try a small foil reflector, to see if I can bring out the dark spots.
Quote:
Originally Posted by threephi View Post

The other way to go is to do some photoshopping to adjust the levels in specific areas of the image, or do HDR or other combined bracketing.

Any chance of a tutorial on the latter two options? Especially, if it can be done with open source tools.
Quote:
Originally Posted by threephi View Post

Can you post a wide shot of the entire setup?

If you mean the aspect ratio, that’s as wide as it gets. The camera is an old Canon A85 in beautiful 4x3. It also has asymmetrical distortion that developed after the defective ccd was replaced, (part of that bad batch from 2005.)
If you mean around the computer, that’s just the work table, (with all the normal crap hidden), I put it on to take these pictures. The 800D in the background is an Esxi server I use for evaluation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhughesuk View Post

is that a 650D? damn I need a new case.thumb.gif

Yes. The 650D is a great little case. It’ll fit a GTX690 or a HD5970. You can install an EATX motherboard if you’re not too anal about which cable grommets you use.
post #748 of 976
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Mach
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post #749 of 976
Quote:
Originally Posted by deees View Post

Thanks for the encouragement. I was concerned that I'd missed some obvious, (for a photographer), setting that would allow me to have more light with less glare.
Glare is highly dependent on the subject, but also relative to exposure, which is itself relative to the amount of light hitting the subject, so it's more about balance within the frame than absolute levels, if you follow me. Glare is usually only a problem if you are getting a distracting bright kick off something that is very reflective or glossy eg. chrome or glass, or it's so bright that it's flaring the lens. Most of the time I control glare by fine adjustments of the positions of the subject, light source, and camera, or use very specific flagging/diffusing to try and knock down only that area as I mentioned before.

Another technique if all else fails would be to (carefully!!!) apply dulling spray to something very reflective, but that's not really appropriate for a personal home setup, since it leaves gunk on your rig and requires a very steady hand to apply it evenly and make sure it goes where you want it, and doesn't go where you don't want it. It's also not the best solution for what is essentially a beauty shot of a product since it fundamentally alters the appearance of the subject, but I thought I'd mention that since it exists.

But the first and last rule is simply to make sure it looks good to your eye. If glare looks good, leave it wink.gif
Quote:
I actually bought some 5-in-1 reflectors with stands that I been using to bounce the light from the softboxes. I clamped some black foam-core, strategically located, to try to cut some of the glare. I might try a small foil reflector, to see if I can bring out the dark spots.
Ah, those flexible reflectors are great tools, and you can tell from your photos you were using a really broad soft source. The softness really shows in the beautiful smooth mid-tones and how diffused the shadows are. thumb.gif
Quote:
Any chance of a tutorial on the latter two options? Especially, if it can be done with open source tools.
GIMP is probably the most powerful open-source photoshop alternative, but there are plenty others with smaller feature sets. HDR might be an in-camera option if your camera supports it, or you can get other software to do it, or it can also be done with gimp if you set it up with the right plugins etc. As far as tutorials go, a little googling will give you enough links to last several lifetimes tongue.gif
Quote:
If you mean the aspect ratio, that’s as wide as it gets. The camera is an old Canon A85 in beautiful 4x3. It also has asymmetrical distortion that developed after the defective ccd was replaced, (part of that bad batch from 2005.)
If you mean around the computer, that’s just the work table, (with all the normal crap hidden), I put it on to take these pictures. The 800D in the background is an Esxi server I use for evaluation.
I meant a wide shot of the entire setup including your lighting equipment. For example this shows the extremely ghetto setup I did when I took these photos of my red BP fittings about a year ago.
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post #750 of 976
Quote:
Originally Posted by hakz View Post

thumb.gifthumb.gif very sexy but what is that?
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