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What is Motherboard Power Phase?

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
Hey all,

I apologize for being a noob here, but my question lies in with motherboard power phases.

1) What are motherboard power phases? All I know is the bigger the number, the better.
2) How can you tell a motherboard's power phase type? I can't seem to find it in the spec on Newegg, or when going to a manufacturer's website.

And yes, I tried googling. I think I kinda understand it. I guess the higher the power phase the more amount of power the motherboard can support.

Again, I apologize. blushsmiley.gif
post #2 of 3
What I know Is that the more power phases is in your MOBO

The more You can Over Clock Your CPU With a less Voltage & less Power Consumption & less Heat Produced
post #3 of 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Invzn;12035276 
Hey all,

I apologize for being a noob here, but my question lies in with motherboard power phases.

1) What are motherboard power phases? All I know is the bigger the number, the better.
2) How can you tell a motherboard's power phase type? I can't seem to find it in the spec on Newegg, or when going to a manufacturer's website.

And yes, I tried googling. I think I kinda understand it. I guess the higher the power phase the more amount of power the motherboard can support.

Again, I apologize. blushsmiley.gif

As I understand it (I am not an Electrical Engineer) the VRM section ususally to the left of the socket is the power supply area that feeds voltage to the CPU. It is usually powered by either a 4 pin or 8 pin power connector. The 24 pin power connector powers everything else on the mobo with perhaps the exception of system RAM. Two of my boards are 8+2 phase meaning that there are 8 separate voltage levels depending on how much the CPU is being used. If you had Cool N Quiet enabled then the VRM would supply voltage at the lowest power level and visa versa if your CPU is running at 100% then the VRM would supply max voltage. Higher energy requiring CPU's like an X6 can be supplied just fine by a good 4+1 phase VRM but generally speaking if a board has 8+2 you can be more confident the VRM is of higher quality and therefore more stable. The +1 and +2 are separate power supplies for the system memory as I understand it. Also, part of the VRM area has what are called MOSFET's which is an acronym for an electronic part that gets quite hot converting the PSU current to what the CPU needs. It's important with a high powered CPU to have a MOSFET cooler to maintain stability and prevent failure from burning out. Whew, I hope that's right. tongue.gif
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD FX 8120 ASUS M5A99X EVO (Beta BIOS 0810) Powercolor HD6970 (2 gig) Factory OC'd to 940 MHz Mushkin DDR3 1600 1.35v (2X4) 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Crucial RealSSD C300 (RAID 0 64 gig x2) Lite-On SATA Windows 7 Pro X64 ASUS MS226 22" 
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Gaming Rig
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD FX 8120 ASUS M5A99X EVO (Beta BIOS 0810) Powercolor HD6970 (2 gig) Factory OC'd to 940 MHz Mushkin DDR3 1600 1.35v (2X4) 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Crucial RealSSD C300 (RAID 0 64 gig x2) Lite-On SATA Windows 7 Pro X64 ASUS MS226 22" 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech Cooler Master Real Power Pro 850 Watts Cooler Master Storm Enforcer Red LED's Logitech MX 518 
Mouse Pad
Allsop 
  hide details  
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