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Tips for a crappy point and shoot.

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm looking for tips on how to get the best possible quality from my crappy camera: A Kodak M873 Easyshare.

These are my settings for the camera:

Exposure Compensation: 0.0
Picture Size: 8MP (4:3)
Long Time Exposure: None
Colour Mode: High Colour (can use black/white, low colour, natural colour)
AF Control: Continuous

White Balance: Daylight (vs auto and a bunch of others)
Exposure Metering: Multi-Pattern (Centre weight/Centre spot)
Focus Zone: Multi-Zone
ISO Speed: ISO 64 (lowest possible)
Sharpness: High

Here's a photo with those settings (resized of course)



I'm no photographer but I can tell it looks "wrong" - photo was done without flash and I had my lamp and light on for the photo, no or little natural light. I don't have photoshop or anything to edit either.

Any tips? I don't have a tripod... Not worth it for this piece of junk camera.
post #2 of 16
Basically, to get a sharp picture inside, you'll need a super low ISO, which means you'll need a long exposure time, which means you'll need a tripod, or something to keep the camera still.
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post #3 of 16
the camera is metering off the monitor, so try something like +1/3EV. shutter speed is also kind of slow, so you might want to tripod it or leave it on something (dont hand hold the camera). set your white balance to tungsten and change the framing a bit.
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post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mz-n10 View Post
the camera is metering off the monitor, so try something like +1/3EV. shutter speed is also kind of slow, so you might want to tripod it or leave it on something (dont hand hold the camera). set your white balance to tungsten and change the framing a bit.
Better yet, turn your monitor off.
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post #5 of 16
well if he turned his monitor off he would lose that element of the picture (maybe its important to him). of course he can turn off the monitor and meter then AEL then shoot.....
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post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mz-n10 View Post
the camera is metering off the monitor, so try something like +1/3EV. shutter speed is also kind of slow, so you might want to tripod it or leave it on something (dont hand hold the camera). set your white balance to tungsten and change the framing a bit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mz-n10 View Post
well if he turned his monitor off he would lose that element of the picture (maybe its important to him). of course he can turn off the monitor and meter then AEL then shoot.....
I figure because of how dark it is in his room that in order to get proper metering on the rest of the room, the monitor will end up being extremely overblown. Like it already is, and it's a few stops behind what it should be.
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post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shane1244 View Post
Basically, to get a sharp picture inside, you'll need a super low ISO, which means you'll need a long exposure time, which means you'll need a tripod, or something to keep the camera still.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mz-n10 View Post
the camera is metering off the monitor, so try something like +1/3EV. shutter speed is also kind of slow, so you might want to tripod it or leave it on something (dont hand hold the camera). set your white balance to tungsten and change the framing a bit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shane1244 View Post
Better yet, turn your monitor off.
Thanks for the tips... Going off that advice, but without a tripod, here's what I get:



I have halogen lights against those crappy energy saving ones, and I opened my curtains this time (although it's cloudy outside)
post #8 of 16
a silly little trick some people do about focusing and exposures is to pre-click (???) your shutter in a different area of the room with different lighting and then move the camera to your intended area. you'll have to move forward and back for focusing the area you want. and generally when you press the shutter halfway it'll lock those settings no matter where it's moved to. that may help compensate for the monitor while it's on. not sure if this works on all point and shoots though but it's a neat thing for getting around focus and junk.
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post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
I might try that and see how it goes. thanks.
post #10 of 16
Definitely an improvement, but 1/4 second is WAY to long of an exposure to be handheld.
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