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[MSNBC] Verizon challenges FCC's net neutrality rules - Page 3  

post #21 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdvanSuper View Post
How would you feel if you were on Verizon and they felt like charging you extra for you to go to your favorite websites? Or better yet what if they blocked certain sites because they deem them unfit? Let's say you use netflix a lot and they want to charge you a fee for using another companies service?

This is what they are fighting about. ISP's are dreaming of a subscription that works like Television, where if you want certain channels you pay X amount.
I'd simply switch ISP's.

And since I know this is coming next, if every ISP implemented a pay for x series of website I'd comply. Like I said earlier, it's their network, not mine.
Edited by r3v3r3nd - 1/20/11 at 5:39pm
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post #22 of 53
That's sad to know. And you think you'll be getting the same prices as now? We're going to be beaten over the head if they ever get their way.

And it's people like you that reinforce their facts that they know people will pay for is because internet is more than a want, it's become a necessity.
Edited by AdvanSuper - 1/20/11 at 5:47pm
post #23 of 53
I hope they win. I don't want the government to be regulating the internet(which will soon lead to censorship of things they don't want us to see)
     
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post #24 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3v3r3nd View Post
That logic is somewhat flawed. Let's say I own a toll road and I charge 5$ for one car to pass. If someone wanted to bring large semi truck carrying tons of hazardous material I should have the right to charge him more than I would an average car. With the laws of net neutrality I have no right to charge him extra and he is entitled to pass for the simple 5$ fee as well, even though his load taxes my road much more heavily and carries with it significantly higher risk.

It's the exact same scenario with net neutrality really. Substitute Verizon's network for the road. You don't own Verizon's network. They do. They allow you to use it for a fee. You use it on their terms. If you don't agree to their terms no one is preventing you from finding a different network.
Except that verizon has the technology, power and influence to build easy to maintain, 1000-lane roads but instead they would rather stick with the single lane roads they have now that were in place since the 90's and make 80% profit margins instead 20% and cash in for the time being while this industry is on a hot rise. And what better way to extend this is to complain to the fed and pretend to be the victims.

There's a reason why places like in Japan, Korea and Germany don't have to deal with this type of nonsense and still get 100 megabit internet for everyone while not having to deal with the politics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALiShaikh View Post
I hope they win. I don't want the government to be regulating the internet(which will soon lead to censorship of things they don't want us to see)
Cool, I'd much rather having a company regulate our direct usage instead and charge me extra whenever they feel like it. Not like the government is suppose to prevent unethical business practices
Edited by darksideleader - 1/20/11 at 5:50pm
post #25 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by darksideleader View Post
Cool, I'd much rather having a company regulate our direct usage instead and charge me extra whenever they feel like it. Not like the government is suppose to prevent unethical business practices
I'd go through the hastle of switching providers then having the government censoring Internet content for everyone. This is the same government that fined CBS like $10 million for Janet Jacksons nipple slip at the Superbowl, and had GTA: San Andreas pulled from store shelves over the Hot Coffee mod. With the net neutraility rules what's to prevent the FCC from regulating Internet content like they do content on television or video games?
post #26 of 53
I would like to see a TV service company try and get away with only allowing access to a fraction of the channels that the subscriber pays for "during peek TV viewing hours", to prevent the signal distribution medium from being overloaded.

ISP's will keep fighting endlessly until they have reached their biggest wet dream scenario come to life:

Package 1:.......... Package 2: etc,etc
Facebook ........... Youtube
Boring Site.......... Boring Site
Boring Site .......... Boring Site
Boring Site.......... Boring Site
Boring Site.......... Boring Site

I would support a new ISP that offered discounted prices as a trade for not being able to provide full bandwidth all the time due to the need for upgrade revenue (that they would actually use for upgrades). In a way the tiered packages of today are like this in that people that do not need excessive bandwidth can get Internet access cheaper, but the difference is that we do not see these ISP's then turning around and upgrading to provide service to those that do require it.

For these multi-Billion dollar companies that are more than capable of these upgrades, but would rather bully to change the rules instead of offering a service, I do not support any of this.

It is unfortunate that there is not more competition towards offering more bandwidth that people have access to so that they could quit these throttle junkies to show how they feel.
Edited by K3VL4R - 1/20/11 at 6:38pm
post #27 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3v3r3nd View Post
That logic is somewhat flawed. Let's say I own a toll road and I charge 5$ for one car to pass. If someone wanted to bring large semi truck carrying tons of hazardous material I should have the right to charge him more than I would an average car. With the laws of net neutrality I have no right to charge him extra and he is entitled to pass for the simple 5$ fee as well, even though his load taxes my road much more heavily and carries with it significantly higher risk.

It's the exact same scenario with net neutrality really. Substitute Verizon's network for the road. You don't own Verizon's network. They do. They allow you to use it for a fee. You use it on their terms. If you don't agree to their terms no one is preventing you from finding a different network.
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3v3r3nd View Post
The toll road isn't the internet, it's their network. They OWN the network. They built and invested in it. They have the right to determine what passes through it.


What exactly do you disagree with? Do you think we have the right to determine what Verizon allows to pass through their networks? Is that the way you think it should work?
So, you pay for a 50 Mbit internet connection and get penalized for using it?

You ought to let Ivan Seidenberg's rod get some air.
post #28 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3v3r3nd View Post
That logic is somewhat flawed. Let's say I own a toll road and I charge 5$ for one car to pass. If someone wanted to bring large semi truck carrying tons of hazardous material I should have the right to charge him more than I would an average car. With the laws of net neutrality I have no right to charge him extra and he is entitled to pass for the simple 5$ fee as well, even though his load taxes my road much more heavily and carries with it significantly higher risk.

It's the exact same scenario with net neutrality really. Substitute Verizon's network for the road. You don't own Verizon's network. They do. They allow you to use it for a fee. You use it on their terms. If you don't agree to their terms no one is preventing you from finding a different network.
ahhh, i will challenge this.
everyone should get the same charge to go through the toll because the truck is 2% of the traffic, and if it is an issue, the owner of the toll should invest in more durable road (larger pipe). and in many cases ( like mine) my only choice of fast road is Comcast, and if i am a truck driver i would not want to take the slow curvy back road because i would not deliver the shipment on time.

but the issue here is every road i (and many others) have the choice of will toll the same way, one is just faster then the other.
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post #29 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3v3r3nd View Post
This analogy doesn't work. The ISP would be the waitress that delivers the food to the customers. The food (internet content) is the product, the customer is the still the customer and the waitress (the ISP's network) is the means by which the food is delivered to the customer. A customer ordering more food places a larger burden on the waitress thus she is compensated to a greater degree with a higher tip.
this does not work either.....
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post #30 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3v3r3nd View Post
Fair to a point, but bandwidth is not an unlimited resource. It costs money.

The brands argument is also quite valid. But as I stated earlier, it's Verizon's own damn network and they should be able to do with it as they please. I don't understand how you can justify the FCC telling a private entity what it can do with it's network.
Two reasons:

1) Verizon (almost certainly) does not own the site that the user is attempting to connect to. Eliminating or throttling access to that site will destroy the site's business, even though it (through its ISP) has paid for equal accessibility by all networks, Verizon's and all others.
2) Verizon's network was built through its existence as a local-monopoly telco. As long as the wires that carry Internet communications also carry monopoly-protected phone service, they're subject to FCC regulation.

If you want the FCC to turn a blind eye to net neutrality, you must also end the local phone and cable monopolies that have allowed Verizon (and Comcast, and AT&T, and Time Warner, and so on) to build their massive networks. Verizon can't have it both ways.
    
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