post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by XNine View Post
Antec doesn't care.
Whether they care or not is a moot issue in such a short period of time. There are two reasons for this. One is the time it takes to develop a great case (especially if the factory and head office are separated by Earth's biggest ocean). Most companies just announce cases around when they are going into production, but to give an example, how long did we know about Silverstone's original Raven case before it was actually available to buy? I could be wrong, but I think it was shown off at the same trade show (CES?) for two years before it was actually available to buy. I was also involved with the BFG Phobos chassis, and it took a long time too. Now, most cases don't quite take as long because they are recycled designs. How many times have you guys seen two cases (sometimes with different brand names on them and looking totally different from the outside) and look inside at the chassis and think, "gosh, that must have come out of the same factory in China."

The other thing is that once a case is out, the company has to sell it for years to recoup the development costs, molds and tooling. Most steel cases have custom tooling made to quickly stamp pieces out of a sheet. That tooling can be pretty expensive. Also, the molds for plastic can be very expensive too. I'm talking about thousands of dollars. Want a whole new face plate? That can run TENS of thousands of dollars, just for the plastic mold. With a few bucks profit per case, you got to sell a LOT of cases before you break even.

Quote:
Originally Posted by slickwilly View Post
I have two Antec 300's, I found they had decent wire management, better then most not as good as some (high end mostly)

Since both of the 300's house low budget gaming rigs for my grandsons they have severed me well and at a very good price point, paid 50 each vs. the 200 I paid for my 700D
Right, compare a $50 product against a $200 product.

Quote:
Originally Posted by slickwilly View Post
I could careless about tool-less design, I have $10,000 worth of hand tools and I know how to use them
"B-b-b-b-but, using tools is hard."

I'm with you on this, except an order of magnitude lower on the value of my tools. Real men own tools.

A #2 Philips screwdriver is all that is needed to build most cases. Sometimes a nutdriver (or pliers) is handy to snug down motherboard standoffs, and if cable/zip ties are used instead of twist ties, then something to cut them is handy.

Also, I have not liked most attempts at "toolless." Some aren't universal enough (for instance many "toolless" expansion card retentions can't deal with dual slot graphics cards) and some aren't secure enough. For instance if it was a system that was moved regularly (like my LAN party rig) I would want hard drives screwed in securely.

With all that being said, I have to admit that I did find one "toolless" bit that actually worked really well, and that is the optical drive bays in the Lian Li Lancool PC-K7B. It uses these little flaps of plastic with two pins. really simple and surprisingly secure. Note that Lian Li uses a different system in other cases (like PC-60FN) that isn't as easy to use, nor as secure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by linkin93 View Post
+1, But I prefer the CoolerMaster method of mounting hard drives. slap two rails on each side of the HDD and slide it into the case. They have rubber bits around them to stop vibrations too
This is one thing that Antec has gotten right that other companies still can't compare. Antec uses some really soft grommets that are also thicker than usual. They really are better than the rubber grommets used by pretty much all other manufacturers.
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Main home rig
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5-3570K ASRock Z77E-ITX GeForce GTX 670 8GB Samsung DDR3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Intel 330 240GB SSD, Crucial M4 256GB mSATA SSD... Samsung DVDRW CoolIt Eco Windows 7 Home Premium x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Samsung 305T Plus, Dell 2005FPW Cooler Master QuickFire Pro mechanical keyboard Rosewill Capstone 450W Lian Li PC-Q11B 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech MX518 Allsop Metal Onkyo TX-SR505 receiver, Polk bookshelf speaker... 
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