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[Book] RSI - The Complete Guide.pdf

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
rsibook.jpg

rsiclaims.jpg

Since there's a lot of typists here, this book of Dr. Pascarelli about RSI - Repetitive Strain Injury is quite helpful and food for thought.

The faster you type, the higher risk you will be suffer from RSI.
(quoted from this book)

Download RSI - The Complete Guide.


Some excerpts

Computer keyboards

No other piece of computer equipment has had more design research and gone through more style changes than the computer keyboard. Research has focused on key placement, size, adjustability, touch, key pressure, and technical design. Still, the keyboard that suits everyone has not yet appeared.

What kind of keyboard should you buy? Choosing a keyboard can be confusing, as there are so many available at a wide range of prices. When you buy a new computer, it comes with a standard keyboard, and if it is not comfortable or is causing you pain, you will want to get one that suits your needs better. As mentioned in chapter 2, the elbow carrying angle, which varies from person to person, will affect the way you place your handsas you hit the keys. The greater your carrying angle, the greater the likelihood that you will need a split keyboard. In any case, I believe a split keyboard is generally a good choice for everyone.

ergokbd1.jpg

Virtually all keyboards now on the market have the cheaper-to-manufacture membrane cushioning for keys, rather than the more desirable individual spring loading for each key, which is best for good touch feedback. Basically, three types of keyboards are available: traditional, fixed split, and adjustable split.

The traditional keyboard is supplied with most home computers and is usually what you will find at your workstation. Some are available with a number pad on the right side, while others are alphanumeric or have a separate number keyboard.

The fixed split keyboard has a split at an angle of about twenty-four degrees and a slight downward taper on each end, which takes the hand slightly out of the palms-down position. The number pad, on the right side, is flat. The palm apron along the front edge of these keyboards is not ergonomically sound—don’t rely on it to support your palms. Small legs that prop up the far end of the keyboard should not be used, since they encourage extending your wrist, as when pushing a door open, a harmful posture. If you purchase this type of keyboard, make sure you have the right size of pullout tray.

ergokbd2a.jpg

There are several varieties of adjustable keyboards. These keyboards can be placed in the traditional position, angled, and even tented so the hands are no longer in the palms-down position but are held somewhere between palms up and palms down.

According to Dr. Alan Hedge, an ergonomics researcher at Cornell University, keying with the palms in a vertical position, as in playing an accordion, allows the forearm tendons, which move the fingers, to work more easily. Since you cannot see the keys in this position, it is difficult or impossible for a nontouch typist to use one, so vertical mirrors are installed on each side.

Many of the people who feel uncomfortable in the palms-down position at the keyboard have tight forearm pronator and supinator muscles, which need to be stretched. By placing the adjustable keyboard at a tented angle of approximately thirty degrees they might feel more comfortable during their retraining. See chapter 6 for details on exercises.
post #2 of 7
I hate split keyboards, I find they slow me down a lot. Any decent mechanical keyboard will help more than a split one IMO.

Welcome to OCN though.
Edited by james_ant - 1/24/11 at 4:54am
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Windows 7 Pro 64bit Samsung XL2370 Cooler Master Quick Fire (cherry blues) Corsair TX850M 
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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Touch and Tactile Feedback

Dr. David Rempel at UCLA and Dr. Thomas Armstrong at the University of Michigan have done extensive research on the amount of work spent in activating keys. Basically, this research has shown that most of us press the keys with far greater force than we need to. Most keyboards no longer have spring-loaded keys, which are more costly to manufacture. Now a plastic or rubber membrane cushions the keys, so that the sense of contact is lost, as is the “click” that told you that you made contact. The effort required to be sure you’ve struck the key increases your workload and potential for injury.

wristrest1.jpg

Wrist Rests
The use of wrist rests is controversial. I prefer to call them wrist guides and ask my patients to use them only as guides, because resting the forearms on a wrist support while keying can be harmful for several reasons. First, they take the upper arms out of the process of keying, so you are overloading the forearm and hand muscles and increasing your chances of injury.

Moreover, the wrist support tends to encourage potentially harmful positioning, particularly wrist extension (bending your wrist up, as in pushing a door open). With the wrist fixed on the wrist rest, there is a tendency to use a windshield-wiperlike wrist motion, which is extra work and harmful. Finally, the wrist rest places pressure over the carpal tunnel area, which is not a good idea.
Edited by Tony_VN - 1/24/11 at 5:03am
post #4 of 7
Dr. Pascarelli's
Complete Guide to
Milking RSI

How To Make Money
Using Soft Science

800px-Jan_Steen_-_De_kwakzalver.jpg
post #5 of 7
Can I have a Doctorate if I tell people to buy MS 'shmergonomic' keyboards?
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post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
This book was downloaded 40 times in 2 weeks. Hopefully it is useful.
post #7 of 7
Is the Copyright Page included?
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