Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Sound Cards and Computer Audio › 2.1 vs. 2.0 PC Speakers Comparison
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

2.1 vs. 2.0 PC Speakers Comparison

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Ok, guys a new topic. I think we had "Five 2.1 Speaker Comparison" from Tom'sharware recently. Now they have come up with "Four 2.0 Speaker Comparison".

Tom'sHardware Link : Four 2.0 Speaker Comparison

The contenders are:
1) Altec Lansing Expressionist Bass FX3022 ($105)
2) Bowers & Wilkins MM-1 ($500)
3) Creative Gigaworks T40 Series II ($150)
4) M-Audio ($180)

Altec Lansing Expressionist Bass FX3022


Bowers & Wilkins MM-1


Creative Gigaworks T40 Series II


M-Audio


Tom'sHarware subjective quotes:

Altec Lansing Expressionist Bass FX3022: "My first impression of the Expressionist Bass FX3022 speakers is that they sound very good. Careful listening suggests that the high end of the spectrum is probably overemphasized. The frequency response suggests a sharp peak at 15 kHz, but these speakers sound like they’re enhancing the upper range more than the chart suggests. People tend to like this sort of sound, since it sounds less muddled to many folks. While audio enthusiasts might not appreciate this effect, I admit I like FX3022's output. Despite an unquestionable emphasis on the highs, music and games have a surprisingly notable bass presence, too.

On the negative side, these speakers lack a feeling of strong, sub-bass power. Because of this, game explosions and noises don’t have the punch I’d like to feel. Aside from this there’s not much to complain about, except for those '+' and '-' volume button controls. Our biggest concern here doesn't involve the FX3022's sound, but the set's lack of headphone output. Nevertheless, for the $105 purchase price (the lowest in our two-channel speaker roundup), there’s undeniable value here. We have no problem recommending the Altec Lansing Expressionist Bass FX3022 to people who want great sound reproduction on a $100 budget."

Bowers & Wilkins MM-1: "The Bowers & Wilkins MM-1s have good depth, great presence, and impeccable highs. The frequency is the flattest of the four speaker systems we’ve tried overall, when you consider the sub-bass range.

There’s only one thing missing, and that’s a dip in the audible bass spectrum. As a result, important bass and rhythm notes are noticeably muted in music, and game explosions don’t deliver a solid punch. Yes, the MM-1s boast amazing build quality, a full-function remote, and an integrated DAC. The USB audio functionality is unique in our roundup and certainly offers advantages, especially for folks who want to use the speakers on a system with lesser-quality audio hardware. But the $499.95 price tag demands solid fundamentals, and without them, the MM-1s are a hard sell, even to elitist audiophiles who might otherwise swear by the Bowers & Wilkins brand."

Creative Gigaworks T40 Series II: "Creative’s Gigaworks T40 Series II has a good, even sound. It tends to perform well with hard-hitting rock and dance music, and is a great gaming companion with good bass and detail. What’s great is that you can trim treble and bass to taste with the best controls available in the test group.

Our only complaint is the speakers’ lack of real sub-bass punch—probably due to the plentiful but relatively small 2.5†drivers—and because of this some music will feel stronger than other selections. But the result isn't bad, and on the whole these speakers sound quite good. They look great, especially with the speaker grilles removed and the orange drivers shown off in all of their 2.5" glory. The $149.99 price tag is high compared to the Altec Lansing FX3022 speakers and quite close to the M-Audio AV 40s, so you should take a close look at the competition before making a decision. Creative’s Gigaworks T40 Series II speakers are certain to appeal to some tastes, though."

M-Audio Studiophile AV 40: "The M-Audio Studiophile AV 40s do what reference speakers should: they sound rich and solid, without too much bass or much high-end boost. According to our ears, they offer the flattest and most accurate response in our test group, even if the MM-1s show a flatter sub-bass curve in frequency response tests. Put simply, the AV 40 is the best-sounding system in our test group and probably the best two-channel system we’ve ever heard.

What’s the downside? I suppose some people might not find the traditional look appealing, but that’s subjective at best. Our main concern is the size and price. The AV 40s are quite large and heavy, and one of the strengths of a two-channel PC speaker system should be how easily it fits on a desk. For the $179.99 price tag, you could purchase a 2.1-channel config with smaller satellites for the desktop and a nice bass-emphasizing subwoofer hidden inconspicuously. To be fair, professionals would likely put the AV 40s on speaker stands behind the desk where they belong, so this might not be a fair complaint. But this is a consumer-level review and it has to be mentioned. Aside from this, the AV 40s offer indisputable sound quality and pro-level connectivity options that make them an attractive product for enthusiasts."

It seems from their review M-Audio AV 40 is the clear winner.

But after reading the final note of the review below:

"A Final Note

The price spread between premium two-channel and 2.1-channel products is not much at all, yet a subwoofer can add a lot of bass presence. With very good 2.1-channel PC speaker systems starting in the $150 range, you really need to define your PC audio goals to understand which product is right for you. Are size and convenience your primary concerns, or can you you can spare the space and love your bass? Whatever you choose, you should try these options out at a local electronics outlet before you commit to a purchase."

Considering the price of some good 2.1 PC speakers:
1) Corsair SP2500 ($260)
2) Klipsch Promedia 2.1 ($120)
3) Logitech Z623 ($140)
4) Logitech Z2300 ($110)

The question generally arises that if a person have $200 to spend on PC speakers which way will he/ she go. Buy 2.0 or 2.1? Performance wise which one will be better?

Looking at the audio frequency graphs of below:

2.0 Speakers



2.1 Speakers



In terms of performance I do not see a hell a heaven difference between the 2.0 & 2.1 in midrange & high frequencies. Though 2.1 with dedicated subwoofer seems to excel in the bass department. But maybe I am omitting something.

I would love if some light is shown on this subject.

Also this invitation goes to all other members.

RishiGuru.
post #2 of 4
if you work in a law office or your pc setup doubles as a receptionist's counter, then i would get a 2.0 system. there is no reason to omit buying a subwoofer unless there are serious space contraints - If youre going for the zen ultra-mininalist look, use the lcd speakers.

good post rishi!
Edited by cozmo5050 - 1/30/11 at 6:20am
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD x6 1055t @ 3.7ghz MSI 790fx-gd70 Gigabyte 5870 (4x4gb)Gskill ripjaw ddr3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Crucial M4 512gb SSD, 2x2TB green 2x Asus 24x sata dvdrw Windows7 64 ultimate dual 24" Dell 2407wfp 1920x1200 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Corsair K90 Antec TruePower blue 750w CoolerMaster HAF932 w/ usb3.0! Logitech g500 
Mouse Pad
Allsop 12''x14'' 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD x6 1055t @ 3.7ghz MSI 790fx-gd70 Gigabyte 5870 (4x4gb)Gskill ripjaw ddr3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Crucial M4 512gb SSD, 2x2TB green 2x Asus 24x sata dvdrw Windows7 64 ultimate dual 24" Dell 2407wfp 1920x1200 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Corsair K90 Antec TruePower blue 750w CoolerMaster HAF932 w/ usb3.0! Logitech g500 
Mouse Pad
Allsop 12''x14'' 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cozmo5050 View Post
if you work in a law office or your pc setup doubles as a receptionist's counter, then i would get a 2.0 system. there is no reason to omit buying a subwoofer unless there are serious space contraints - If youre going for the zen ultra-mininalist look, use the lcd speakers.

good post rishi!
Thanks cozmo5050.
post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by cozmo5050 View Post
if you work in a law office or your pc setup doubles as a receptionist's counter, then i would get a 2.0 system. there is no reason to omit buying a subwoofer unless there are serious space contraints - If youre going for the zen ultra-mininalist look, use the lcd speakers.

good post rishi!
Good subwoofers are rather expensive though. If you get into the real high end 2.0 you might find that you don't even need a sub unless you're a bass head. Of course, none of those speakers tested have big woofers so of course bass response will not be that great. Obviously that's not true for all sets though.
SFF Goodness
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 4770k ASRock z87m OC formula MSI GTX 780 GAMING 8GB G Skill Ripjaw DDR3 2400MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
SanDisk Extreme II 480 GB Seagate 2TB Noctua NH-D14 Windows 8.1 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Dell U2312HM x3 Das Model S Professional Silverstone Strider Gold Evolution 750w Silverstone SG10 
MouseAudioAudioAudio
Logitech G500 Xfi Titanium HD Audioengine 5+ Velodyne Impact 12 
  hide details  
Reply
SFF Goodness
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 4770k ASRock z87m OC formula MSI GTX 780 GAMING 8GB G Skill Ripjaw DDR3 2400MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
SanDisk Extreme II 480 GB Seagate 2TB Noctua NH-D14 Windows 8.1 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Dell U2312HM x3 Das Model S Professional Silverstone Strider Gold Evolution 750w Silverstone SG10 
MouseAudioAudioAudio
Logitech G500 Xfi Titanium HD Audioengine 5+ Velodyne Impact 12 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Sound Cards and Computer Audio
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Sound Cards and Computer Audio › 2.1 vs. 2.0 PC Speakers Comparison