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Koolance TMS-200

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I was just looking at the TMS-200 fan controller and couldn't help but notice that it doesn't have a very high amperage with a total board capacity of 6.5A, is that enough?

Also, the temperature sensors it comes with, how easy are those to integrate into a liquid loop?

The optional flowmetre was interesting too.


Finally, any thoughts on running this in conjunction with say a micro ITX board and double drive bay LCD as a separate system so I can monitor temps without having windows actually booted.
    
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post #2 of 9
6.5A is a decent amount, as long as you aren't running any fans above 3000 RPM you probably won't have a problem with power.

The temperature sensors can be integrated quite easily, just screw them into an empty port on your reservoir. Keep in mind that Koolance uses their own proprietary system so only temperature senors sold by Koolance will work with the board.
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post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by charliehorse55;12209087 
6.5A is a decent amount, as long as you aren't running any fans above 3000 RPM you probably won't have a problem with power.

The temperature sensors can be integrated quite easily, just screw them into an empty port on your reservoir. Keep in mind that Koolance uses their own proprietary system so only temperature senors sold by Koolance will work with the board.


Is there anything you don't seem to know vast amounts about?!

The temperature sensors may be a bit tricky, I was considering using inline sensors to get temp readings at different points in the loop.

That said, the koolance fan controller is probably the best I've seen.

Don't want to put you on the spot, but are there any products you would recommend?

I'll probably be using it to control 6 to 9 fans, the 6 being 2 sets of 3 on my radiator and then 3 separate case fans.

It's in the sig 800D case so the only fan I would really need to control would be the rear air intake (I reversed the fan).

Then of course the pump control.




Hmmm, the TMS-200 does fill that rather well.
    
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post #4 of 9
Yes, the only problem I can see with that controller would be the software to drive it. Usually devices like this do not have a public API and the included software is crap. While they can be reverse-engineered it takes time and it's isn't exactly a high profile thing.

No need to measure water temperature throughout the loop as even with your loop it's barely going to change more than a single C.

Really, my personal favorite way to do this is to wire it all up yourself with some phidgets electronic boards, as then you will have complete control over control of everything. Of course you also have to write the software in C, so if you aren't up to this level of customization the Koolance board is a better option.
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post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by charliehorse55;12237595 
Yes, the only problem I can see with that controller would be the software to drive it. Usually devices like this do not have a public API and the included software is crap. While they can be reverse-engineered it takes time and it's isn't exactly a high profile thing.

No need to measure water temperature throughout the loop as even with your loop it's barely going to change more than a single C.

Really, my personal favorite way to do this is to wire it all up yourself with some phidgets electronic boards, as then you will have complete control over control of everything. Of course you also have to write the software in C, so if you aren't up to this level of customization the Koolance board is a better option.

That's a very interesting possibility. I'm not totally unfamiliar with C, I did a course in C++ when I was back at uni. But that's several years ago now so I would essentially be learning from scratch.

It doesn't look too terrible though, having a glimpse at some of their example code.

At a basic level I assume you'd get an if statement to run every second or so and adjust voltages accordingly. And that just happens to be very compatible with a nice little mini-ITX.

Ideally, I would quite like to be able to set up a PID controller for my PC (though utterly pointless I know) it would be an interesting exercise. I may be getting ahead of myself by a mile, in fact I almost certainly am, however I would assume programming a rudimentary P controller in C would be quite simple... Making it work on the other hand...

There'd probably be quite a long delay in fan-speed change and temperature change which would cause problems...


Sorry, ramblings...

You've pretty much introduced me to a dream come true, sitting around looking at new computers I could build when a full project and a half was sitting just around the corner...

There's a fair few developers I know at work I'm sure wouldn't mind giving me a hand, and tomorrow I should be able to grab a dev who plays around with breadboards as a hobby.

Thanks again, you're impossibly amazing!
    
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post #6 of 9
Yeah that's what I have setup for my rig. You can strip the code down a LOT from what they recommend. For example, here is the code to turn my LEDs ON/OFF:
Code:
#include <phidget21.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int interfacekit_simple()
{
//Declare an InterfaceKit handle
CPhidgetInterfaceKitHandle ifKit = 0;

//create the InterfaceKit object
CPhidgetInterfaceKit_create(&ifKit);

//open the interfacekit for device connections
CPhidget_open((CPhidgetHandle)ifKit, -1);

//get the program to wait for an interface kit device to be attached
if((result = CPhidget_waitForAttachment((CPhidgetHandle)ifKit, 10000)))
{
printf("No Phidget Unit Attached\n");
exit(1);
}

//Get the current status of the LED
int currentStatus = 0;
CPhidgetInterfaceKit_getOutputState(ifKit, 6, &currentStatus);

//Inverse it, we want to toggle the state
if(currentStatus == 0)
currentStatus = 1;
else
currentStatus = 0;

//Set the new status
CPhidgetInterfaceKit_setOutputState(ifKit, 6, currentStatus);

//all done, exit
CPhidget_close((CPhidgetHandle)ifKit);
CPhidget_delete((CPhidgetHandle)ifKit);
return 0;
}

int main ()
{
interfacekit_simple();
return 0;
}


The only problem with the Phidgets setup is that they don't have a unit for linearly scaling the voltage. I use the SSR relay board to switch my fans between 5V and 12V. If you really needed linear voltage control the board can output a signal that can switch up to 60 times per second between 0 and 5V, which with some DIY electronics should be able to be turned into a fan controller.
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post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Could you not use a motor controller like this:

http://www.phidgets.com/products.php?category=13&product_id=1062
    
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post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crabid;12239782 
Could you not use a motor controller like this:

http://www.phidgets.com/products.php?category=13&product_id=1062

I'm not sure, that board was for controlling stepper motors. Possibly, you should probably email their staff to be sure.

http://www.phidgets.com/products.php?category=12&product_id=1064

^^

That one would work for sure, although it costs a little more. It would regulate the fans through PWM (but not their PWM wire, the whole fan). The only problem with that is that you would not be able to get accurate RPM readings.
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post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
It's a pity they don't have a smaller version of it, funnily coming back to amperages, but 32A max is much more than's needed, something tells me the unit would be quite cheap if it didn't have such a high capacity.

I'll ask some of the guys at work and see what they think on it, it is quite an investment after all. It may end up as a preparation project to tide me over to ivybridge.
    
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