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post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomaskir View Post
Its just useless when routers and switches for for 20$ have auto MDI/MDX these days...

Also, reedited the post above...
professional grade routers do not use MDI/MDX
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post #42 of 59
Draw a diagram, I can't make heads or tales of this thread..
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post #43 of 59
Thread Starter 


Static route on router A: dest 192.168.1.0/24 next hop 10.15.168.4
Static route on router B: dest 10.15.168.0/24 next hop 192.168.1.2

DHCP server on router A assigns into 10.15.168.0/24 with gateway 10.15.168.1
DHCP server on router B assigns into 192.168.1.0/24 with gateway 192.168.1.1

I want to communicate with hosts in 10.15.168/24 from hosts in 192.168.1.0/24 and vice-versa.

Will this work? Is there any configuration needed on Router C?
Edited by tomaskir - 2/15/11 at 7:43am
post #44 of 59
Nice diagram..

You shouldn't need any static routes on your router, just some proper 'route' commands injected into windows routing table should send any traffic for the 192.168.1.0 & 10.15.168.0 network to the proper default gateway. I use these commands all the time to route traffic to my Cisco Pod.

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/d....mspx?mfr=true

Don't worry about screwing up your routing table, you can remove them or just reboot. Once you get the right syntax down append the 'add route' command with the -d flag to make it permanent.

I use these routes all the time for my home network. Windows doesn't play nice with more then one default gateway.

EDIT:

Try these

APT1 machines:
-route add 10.15.168.0 mask 255.255.255.0 10.15.168.4 metric 1
APT2 machines:
-route add 192.168.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.2 metric 1

Should get you setup..
Edited by scottsee - 2/14/11 at 5:15pm
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post #45 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottsee View Post
Nice diagram..

You shouldn't need any static routes on your router, just some proper 'route' commands injected into windows routing table should send any traffic for the 192.168.1.0 & 10.15.168.0 network to the proper default gateway. I use these commands all the time to route traffic to my Cisco Pod.

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/d....mspx?mfr=true

Don't worry about screwing up your routing table, you can remove them or just reboot. Once you get the right syntax down append the 'add route' command with the -d flag to make it permanent.

I use these routes all the time for my home network. Windows doesn't play nice with more then one default gateway.

EDIT:

Try these

APT1 machines:
-route add 10.15.168.0 mask 255.255.255.0 10.15.168.4 metric 1
APT2 machines:
-route add 192.168.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.2 metric 1

Should get you setup..
Doing routing in windows would require reconfiguring each device separately, and also reconfiguring each new device added to the network. Why would I do that if I can just create static routes on the routers.

Not to mention I have other devices in these networks besides the windows machines, which I cant do this on.

Thanks for the tip, but I need to do the routing on the routers themselves.

Also, if I were to config routing tables in windows, it would be like this

APT1 machines:
-route add 192.168.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 10.15.168.4 metric 1
APT2 machines:
-route add 10.15.168.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.2 metric 1
Edited by tomaskir - 2/15/11 at 1:18am
post #46 of 59
I still don't see what's so terribly wrong with my solution.
Machines on router C will broadcast for an IP address, RouterC will pick it up and answer, placing the machine onto that subnet. Being a router, it won't pass on the broadcast request to the bridging router. Router A will do the same for subnet A.
Remember, no home router is configured by default to allow TCP/IP broadcasts of any kind to pass beyond its' own network.
Allowing the two subnets to talk to each other is a security issue, but it's the one you wanted. Any other solution that involves access control and security on the bridge is going to need more hardware, like an old PC with 2 NICs and linux/BSD.
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post #47 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by allikat View Post
I still don't see what's so terribly wrong with my solution.
Machines on router C will broadcast for an IP address, RouterC will pick it up and answer, placing the machine onto that subnet. Being a router, it won't pass on the broadcast request to the bridging router. Router A will do the same for subnet A.
Remember, no home router is configured by default to allow TCP/IP broadcasts of any kind to pass beyond its' own network.
Allowing the two subnets to talk to each other is a security issue, but it's the one you wanted. Any other solution that involves access control and security on the bridge is going to need more hardware, like an old PC with 2 NICs and linux/BSD.
This one?

Quote:
Originally Posted by allikat View Post
The other method, is to change the IP setup for one of the houses and set routerB into simple switch mode (IE no DHCP etc).

What you do:
Set router A to IP 192.168.0.1 with the IP scope of 192.168.0.x and netmask of 255.255.0.0, with default gateway of 192.168.0.1
Set router C to IP 192.168.1.1 with the IP scope of 192.168.1.x and the same netmask. with default gateway of 192.168.1.1
Basicly i would be using Router C as a switch only using your configuration correct?
Edited by tomaskir - 2/15/11 at 7:32am
post #48 of 59
There would still need to be routes added on both routers in the last. As neither router would know how to communicate with the other subnet. The problem with many of the home routers out there is they will only allow 2 subnets. 1 out the WAN interface and all the rest of the ports with the subnet of your choosing.

Some routers have a firewall built-in which will allow the use of DMZ moving 1 or 2 ports into that DMZ, which can then have another subnet added. Linksys and Netgear used to have this.

Tomaskir what hardware are you utilizing now? That is really the only way we can determine if your current hardware will do what you need.
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post #49 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bratas View Post
There would still need to be routes added on both routers in the last. As neither router would know how to communicate with the other subnet. The problem with many of the home routers out there is they will only allow 2 subnets. 1 out the WAN interface and all the rest of the ports with the subnet of your choosing.

Some routers have a firewall built-in which will allow the use of DMZ moving 1 or 2 ports into that DMZ, which can then have another subnet added. Linksys and Netgear used to have this.

Tomaskir what hardware are you utilizing now? That is really the only way we can determine if your current hardware will do what you need.
Routers A and B are Vigor 2700 VGST routers. Router C Im going to buy once i have all this figured out.

I can add the neccesary static routes into A and B, already looked through the Vigors, they support this. I think I will need a better Router C, something that can have NAT and firewall turned off.
post #50 of 59
I'd suggest a DD-WRT-capable unit for router C. Massive amount of configuration options compared to most SOHO routers. You'll be able to turn of NAT and the firewall no problem.
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