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How to test for dead motherboard - Page 2

post #11 of 14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mongoloid;12424806 
any blinking lights (or any red lights) on the motherboard?

I'm not at it right now, but I did not notice anything abnormal with the mobo lights or any sort of burns. Will double check if I see any.
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post #12 of 14
There's a few things I generally check for.

1. Are any of the CPU pins bent and or damaged?
2. Are all of my power cables connected properly?
3. Are all of my memory sticks correctly seated and fully functional?
4. Is my CPU in working condition?
5. Is my power supply in working condition?
6. What does my LED post read as?
7. Is my BIOS chip loose and or possibly damaged?

1) I generally check the pins are all straight. If it is not, I generally attempt to reposition it in the correct direction by gently using tweasers or a mechanical pencil (do not pull on the pins).

2) Some motherboards only use a 4-pin motherboard power connection instead of an 8-pin. If the plug is pushed in the wrong direction, the motherboard will generally not power on. Align the connection accordingly.

3) I generally seat one stick of RAM on a functioning PC one at a time to make sure they aren't causing any issues, or I take a pair that I can guarantee is in 100 percent working condition and use those to test my motherboard.

4) For socket 775, I keep a few spare -working- Pentium 4 Processors in my house so that I can test whether my dominant CPU is causing any malfunctions with my motherboard booting up. If this is not an option, finding someone who can let you test their CPU on your motherboard would also work.

5) I keep multiple working PSUs around to verify whether my dominant power supply may have malfunctioned at some point. If extras are not at hand, borrowing someones open computer and simply switching the plugs to test for power issues would work just as well.

6) Generally, the post LED monitor will flip through a series of digits to indicate that all components of a motherboard are fully functional (FF). However, if the FF command is immediate without any prior indication of letters or numbers, this generally indicates that there is a problem with the motherboard. It may or may not have to do with the BIOs chip.

7) If the motherboard is still failing after everything else is checked and in working condition, I generally try to reset my CMOS. If this fails, there is probably a decent chance that the BIOS chip got corrupted at some point and is no longer in working condition.

Hmmm, these are the methods I used to test my broken 780i Motherboard.
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post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jivenjune View Post
There's a few things I generally check for.

1. Are any of the CPU pins bent and or damaged?
2. Are all of my power cables connected properly?
3. Are all of my memory sticks correctly seated and fully functional?
4. Is my CPU in working condition?
5. Is my power supply in working condition?
6. What does my LED post read as?
7. Is my BIOS chip loose and or possibly damaged?

1) I generally check the pins are all straight. If it is not, I generally attempt to reposition it in the correct direction by gently using tweasers or a mechanical pencil (do not pull on the pins).

2) Some motherboards only use a 4-pin motherboard power connection instead of an 8-pin. If the plug is pushed in the wrong direction, the motherboard will generally not power on. Align the connection accordingly.

3) I generally seat one stick of RAM on a functioning PC one at a time to make sure they aren't causing any issues, or I take a pair that I can guarantee is in 100 percent working condition and use those to test my motherboard.

4) For socket 775, I keep a few spare -working- Pentium 4 Processors in my house so that I can test whether my dominant CPU is causing any malfunctions with my motherboard booting up. If this is not an option, finding someone who can let you test their CPU on your motherboard would also work.

5) I keep multiple working PSUs around to verify whether my dominant power supply may have malfunctioned at some point. If extras are not at hand, borrowing someones open computer and simply switching the plugs to test for power issues would work just as well.

6) Generally, the post LED monitor will flip through a series of digits to indicate that all components of a motherboard are fully functional (FF). However, if the FF command is immediate without any prior indication of letters or numbers, this generally indicates that there is a problem with the motherboard. It may or may not have to do with the BIOs chip.

7) If the motherboard is still failing after everything else is checked and in working condition, I generally try to reset my CMOS. If this fails, there is probably a decent chance that the BIOS chip got corrupted at some point and is no longer in working condition.

Hmmm, these are the methods I used to test my broken 780i Motherboard.
I went ahead and changed out the PSU as suggested. I was having a problem with the fans turning on as well so i agreed with it being a shot PSU.

The new PSU did turn the fans on, however the computer never posted. Every looks like it's running, however nothing pops up on the screen or post.

I am going to check out the numbers on the Mobo that I saw last night to see what they mean. Maybe an error code.

Other than that, only thing it could be is the cpu chip went bad or mobo is out...Will be changing those out tonight.

One thing that might make a difference, the PSU to mobo power pin is only a 4 pin while my mobo has an 8 pin....It has never been a problem before but possibly could be now?
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post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
- Post Error Code 88 - Looks bad from what I can find out on the web. Mobo is DFI Lanparty P35. Seems like a defective mobo. Only two options are reset cmos (Which I have) or RMA....

How is DFI on RMA's? How long is the warranty?...I feel I am no longer under warranty as I have had the mobo for over 2 years :-/
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