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[NS] Anti-Laser Built For First Time. - Page 4

post #31 of 54
And third place goes too...

Quote:
Originally Posted by runeazn View Post
lol wireless energy it would be awesome..
"sup dawg, wait how the hell are you using that chainsaw without benzine.
yo dawg, we have wireless energy now" as its almost impossible to use batteries.
XD
Our Runner Up is....
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dronac View Post
Hurry, before Watson moved beyond Jeopardy and becomes sentient!
And the Geek of the Day Award belongs to...!

*drum roll* (firing for effect)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xzeara View Post
Now to make this into body armor so we may resist our computer overlords which are armed with high powered laser rifles!
Congrats!

leave it to lazers to bring out the geek in the Geek
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post #32 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonindeBeatrice View Post
No, heat is energy.
I agree. Heat is energy, but not an energy that we can use to power everyday things. You dont run your cars and cell phones off of heat.
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post #33 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poppinj View Post
I agree. Heat is energy, but not an energy that we can use to power everyday things. You dont run your cars and cell phones off of heat.
Please learn thermodynamics, then come back here. You can harness localized heat to generate localized potential energy (which can be used to do work), but at the expense of greater ambient heat (waste heat).
post #34 of 54
Mirror anyone?
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post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by runeazn View Post
lol wireless energy it would be awesome..
"sup dawg, wait how the hell are you using that chainsaw without benzine.
yo dawg, we have wireless energy now" as its almost impossible to use batteries.
XD
Its called lightning
post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
Could it be used for wireless power transfer?
Ideal for static objects. Moving targets would be overly complex and dangerous in a consumer enviroment, but great for space travel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chunky_Chimp View Post
Steam turbine.
Thermocouple.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ace Telekinesis View Post
Remember tho air as a medium causes refraction and distortion. Perhaps if they created a vacuum and tried it they'd have 99.999999999999999999%
The experiment may have been in a vacuum. 99.4% was turned into heat, some could have been defracted by the silicon itself. Add in a medium in an uncontrolled enviroment with dust, water vapor, and temperature fluctuations, that efficiency will drop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
Solar, nuclear, oil, gas, coal.... all generate heat which is then converted to electrical energy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poppinj View Post
No. Heat is a byproduct of the energy creation, and is in fact waste. We dont burn gasoline so that we can create heat so that we can then turn that heat into usable energy. The heat is energy wasted. The more effective a technology is the less heat it creates. While I have read of technology that can turn heat into usable energy it is terrible inefficient.
1. Heat is a form of energy...

2. Heat is only considered as waste if you do not use that energy.
Edited by Seeing Red - 2/17/11 at 1:55pm
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post #37 of 54
Im not trying to cause arguments Im just trying to understand the how it would be practical use this technology to power electronics. People are citing things like solar, nuclear, gasoline ect as producing heat, which we then use as an energy source. As I understand it, this is not the case.

Gasoline/oil/coal = chemical energy
Nuclear energy = fusion
Photovoltaic panels = Sunlight (UV) photo = light , voltaic = electrical


Heat is typically an unintended byproduct of the conversion of energy from one form to another. Heat is simply kinetic energy, I get that. I know that we can in fact harness heat to create electricity through uses such geothermal power plants. I'm not a science major but from what I know of producing electricity from heat alone is that it is typically terrible inefficient. I may be wrong. I'm just curious as to a pocket sized application which would change the kinetic energy of heat into electricity to wirelessly power our mobile devices. Im not saying that it wouldn't work as we can generally change one form of energy (heat) into almost any other (electricity), I'm just wondering how feasible it would be.
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post #38 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonindeBeatrice View Post
No, heat is energy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seeing Red View Post
-snip-
Clearly, Poppinj understands what you're saying, but you're still partially wrong. As he's saying, in some cases, heat is energy going to waste. I don't see why you guys are disagreeing with him. Internal combustion engines, for example- a lot of energy in the form of heats goes to waste. The same happens with solar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Poppinj View Post
Im not trying to cause arguments Im just trying to understand the how it would be practical use this technology to power electronics. People are citing things like solar, nuclear, gasoline ect as producing heat, which we then use as an energy source. As I understand it, this is not the case.

Gasoline/oil/coal = chemical energy
Nuclear energy = fusion
Photovoltaic panels = Sunlight (UV) photo = light , voltaic = electrical


Heat is typically an unintended byproduct of the conversion of energy from one form to another. Heat is simply kinetic energy, I get that. I know that we can in fact harness heat to create electricity through uses such geothermal power plants. I'm not a science major but from what I know of producing electricity from heat alone is that it is typically terrible inefficient. I may be wrong. I'm just curious as to a pocket sized application which would change the kinetic energy of heat into electricity to wirelessly power our mobile devices. Im not saying that it wouldn't work as we can generally change one form of energy (heat) into almost any other (electricity), I'm just wondering how feasible it would be.
Nuclear energy creates heat, which we use to spin steam turbines. On a microscopic scale, yes, it is very inefficient to turn heat directly to electricity, but on the large scale, it works well.

Edit: Well, actually, fossil fuel combustion uses heat as an intermediate method of energy transfer, because those use boilers and turbines just like nuclear does. Also, the solar power that DuckieHo was referring to the use of mirrors to concentrate light to boil water, so the same happens with that as well. He wasn't talking about photovoltaic cells as using heat energy.
Edited by aroc91 - 2/17/11 at 2:15pm
    
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post #39 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poppinj View Post
Heat is typically an unintended byproduct of the conversion of energy from one form to another. Heat is simply kinetic energy, I get that.
But it's defined as the energy that flows from one body to another on account of the temperature difference between them. And it isn't useless by any stretch of imagination:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ca...t_engine_2.svg

Quote:
I know that we can in fact harness heat to create electricity through uses such geothermal power plants. I'm not a science major but from what I know of producing electricity from heat alone is that it is typically terrible inefficient.
I think it holds for the processes you outlined above, with the exception of solar panels.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_turbine

The point of efficiency:
Quote:
Because the turbine generates rotary motion, it is particularly suited to be used to drive an electrical generator – about 80% of all electricity generation in the world is by use of steam turbines. <b>The steam turbine is a form of heat engine</B> that derives much of its improvement in thermodynamic efficiency through the use of multiple stages in the expansion of the steam, which results in a closer approach to the ideal reversible process.
    
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post #40 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poppinj View Post
Im not trying to cause arguments Im just trying to understand the how it would be practical use this technology to power electronics. People are citing things like solar, nuclear, gasoline ect as producing heat, which we then use as an energy source. As I understand it, this is not the case.

Gasoline/oil/coal = chemical energy
Nuclear energy = fusion
Photovoltaic panels = Sunlight (UV) photo = light , voltaic = electrical


Heat is typically an unintended byproduct of the conversion of energy from one form to another. Heat is simply kinetic energy, I get that. I know that we can in fact harness heat to create electricity through uses such geothermal power plants. I'm not a science major but from what I know of producing electricity from heat alone is that it is typically terrible inefficient. I may be wrong. I'm just curious as to a pocket sized application which would change the kinetic energy of heat into electricity to wirelessly power our mobile devices. Im not saying that it wouldn't work as we can generally change one form of energy (heat) into almost any other (electricity), I'm just wondering how feasible it would be.
You were right about internal combustion engines (my bad) where the chemical reaction itself creates the work. The heat is a byproduct but is still needed in order for the gases to exert enough pressure.

Gasoline, oil, and coal could be used in a engine or used to heat water for a steam turbine which turns a generator. It's the same with nuclear power. He mentions solar, but not in the sense of photovoltaic. Solar could also be used to heat a fluid in order to create work.

I'm not sure what the researchers intention was when using this in micro chips but on a larger scale where large amounts of energy are needed there are obviously more applications.
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