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What's the point of mechanical actuation? - Page 4

post #31 of 37
If you type lightly they are fine and preferred by some.
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post #32 of 37
So what is the point of cherry blacks then if you cannot feel the point of actuation???
They are noisy if you bottom them out so don't say silent. Maybe they were made for Bottom Outters?......headscratch.gif
Edited by ice_owl - 2/26/11 at 4:36pm
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post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ice_owl;12536554 
So what is the point of cherry blacks then if you cannot feel the point of actuation???
They are noisy if you bottom them out so don't say silent. Maybe they were made for Bottom Outters?......headscratch.gif
I believe they're aimed more towards gamers, while people who will be using their keyboard more for typing should look at Browns and Blues.
post #34 of 37
Are there any mechanical keyboards out there with an extended travel distance? Say 2mm actuation, 10mm travel?

Assuming they could avoid rigidity problems, it seems like that would be much easier on your fingers as you would never bottom out on the keys.


And I'm amazed that you like the Apple keyboards, Ripster. I'm primarily a Mac user and can't stand them. The older Powerbook keyboards weren't quite so bad, but the flat chiclet keyboards are just awful. Noisy to type on, easy to lose your place (I can touch-type, but not brilliantly) and hard on your fingers. The backlighting looks awful on them compared to the older keyboards as well.
post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ice_owl;12536554 
So what is the point of cherry blacks then if you cannot feel the point of actuation???
They are noisy if you bottom them out so don't say silent. Maybe they were made for Bottom Outters?......headscratch.gif

Linear switches used to be ubiquitous back in the 70s and 80s because they are simple and reliable (introducing tactility often complicates the switch and introduces points of failure - just look at the Blue Cherry). Black switches often get used for keyboards used on things that need reliability like industrial equipment etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NotAgain;12540675 
Are there any mechanical keyboards out there with an extended travel distance? Say 2mm actuation, 10mm travel?

Assuming they could avoid rigidity problems, it seems like that would be much easier on your fingers as you would never bottom out on the keys.

They'd also have to be bigger to make space for the extra travel, which given the tendency towards low profile keys is unideal
Quote:
And I'm amazed that you like the Apple keyboards, Ripster. I'm primarily a Mac user and can't stand them. The older Powerbook keyboards weren't quite so bad, but the flat chiclet keyboards are just awful. Noisy to type on, easy to lose your place (I can touch-type, but not brilliantly) and hard on your fingers. The backlighting looks awful on them compared to the older keyboards as well.

I find the desktop Apple Aluminium keyboard to be superior to the Macbook Pro keyboard, which is in turn superior to the regular Macbook keyboard (I suspect that the rigidity of the Macbook Pro's case may account for the better feel of its keyboard)
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post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ch_123;12541600 
They'd also have to be bigger to make space for the extra travel, which given the tendency towards low profile keys is unideal
I suppose, but I thought people buying mechanical keyboards were the kind of person that realise that spending more money on something can bring tangible benefits, and that going with thinner, lighter, newer models of something are not necessarily better. (see also: flat panels vs CRTs, thin Edge LED LCDs vs thicker CCFL or Backlit LED LCDs)

And if you think about it, most mice are quite a bit higher than keyboards, I'm sure it would not be a bad thing to have them at the same level, providing there is sufficient wrist support.

Just a thought anyway, it seemed like it would be nice to have a keyboard that is mechanical with a short actuation point (perhaps even reduce it further) and a long enough travel distance that you are never going to bottom out on the keys.

You'd think someone would have tried it with all the various other attempts at improving the 'ergonomics' of using a keyboard. Most of the force on my fingers when typing seems to be when the keys bottom out rather than actuating the keys.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ch_123;12541600 
I find the desktop Apple Aluminium keyboard to be superior to the Macbook Pro keyboard, which is in turn superior to the regular Macbook keyboard (I suspect that the rigidity of the Macbook Pro's case may account for the better feel of its keyboard)
Hm, I will have to check it, that's surprising to hear. The only thing I've really noticed between them is that the MacBooks we have here are older than the Pros and thus the membrane isn't quite as stiff. I absolutely hate the flat keycaps on them and the chiclet style though, it's not just the mechanism I don't like.

I do wonder what it would be like to go back to an old silver Powerbook/MacBook Pro keyboard though. I seemed to like them much more, but I wonder if it's just the keycaps or if there were other changes made as well.
post #37 of 37
The premise is wrong. The question should be, what is the point of rubber dome keyboards? The answer would be, to provide a cheaper keyboard (at the expense of quality), so the complete product (such as a desktop PC) can compete with sets from competitors who also buy the cheapest keyboards. Which is what happened in the early nineties when the PCs started really selling.
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0EKF/is_n1891_v37/ai_11677212/?tag=content;col1
It killed most mechanical keyboard makers, and this makes keyboards one of the few technologies which became worse over the years.
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