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So, what's the big deal with FakeRAID?

post #1 of 4
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So yeah, I've read a bunch of stuff on OCN about how onboard raid controllers have the task performed by the CPU and how that's bad etc.

But for most gamers that's fine, the game is loaded in to the RAM / VRAM and there's very little disc activity after that...so why does it matter?
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post #2 of 4
I dont think it matters much for the typical gaming work-load, though more and more games are streaming (Crysis and WoW do it), where you have disk activity as you move around.

I use fakeRaid™ myself, and it doesnt use that much CPU, and is just as stable as any dedicated board. The only thing dedicated boards give you is battery backup of the cache, and larger caches, which dont matter much for loading game levels or watching a movie. If you had a typical server workload, it may be worth it.
post #3 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by justarealguy;12512783 
So yeah, I've read a bunch of stuff on OCN about how onboard raid controllers have the task performed by the CPU and how that's bad etc.

But for most gamers that's fine, the game is loaded in to the RAM / VRAM and there's very little disc activity after that...so why does it matter?


Well. a whole level of a modern game does not fit into the RAm and VRAM alone. Just like the previous user said, Crysis loads/streams stuff as we move around, and if the CPU has to do both gaming and HDD loading, your fps will drop a bit, especially if you have a Dual Core.

A game like Half-Life 2 (2004), for example uses certain places in the game to temporarily halt the game and load another chunk of data, so you won't have delays mid-game. Since HDD's have gotten faster, this is no longer required.

Of course, the more ram and vram you have, the better. And to compensate for Raid Software, the more cores, the better.
 
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post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by justarealguy;12512783 
So yeah, I've read a bunch of stuff on OCN about how onboard raid controllers have the task performed by the CPU and how that's bad etc.

But for most gamers that's fine, the game is loaded in to the RAM / VRAM and there's very little disc activity after that...so why does it matter?

The fact that fakeRAID has the parity calculations performed by the CPU isn't inherently bad, because software RAID (which is controlled by the operating system) does exactly the same. What is bad is the implementation of the parity RAID levels (RAID 4, 5 and 6) in the fakeRAID controller's firmware.

The implementations are nowhere near as robust or high performing as those found in hardware RAID cards or in software RAID. For non-parity RAID levels (RAID 0, 1, 10 and 0+1), it doesn't matter, but for parity RAID levels it matters very much.
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