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Help me with Fedora - Page 6

post #51 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rookie1337 View Post
Wait...why are you using Fedora 12? 14 came out a month ago I thought.

And now I'm trying to figure out how I got flash working because I did nothing besides install chromium.

We're here for you though Bass.

PS: Slackware has cake. Though you do have to make it yourself.
No, I just grabbed that off the net. lol. I am using 14.
I'll try some more stuff in the terminal. I haven't gone into my Fedora partition today, I've been playing the Crysis 2 demo. It's... disappointing.. :/

Yeah, I can tell. You guys have stuck with me through 3 distros.
post #52 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassdoken View Post
1) Yes, I am definitely not buying AMD/ATI, at least for non-gaming rigs.
2) When I installed the 11.2 drivers (fgrlx), when booting, it gets stuck on this screen:
3) Okay, thanks. It says it does, but in previous installs, flash only worked a few times. So how would I go about doing that?
4) I only like chocolate chip cookies, and only when they're fresh out of the oven, warm and oozy. Yum.
2) I suppose you can try the vesa driver. If you want to try it out, you'll have to boot in runlevel 3 and edit your xorg.conf. If you want to do that I'll explain in another post.

3) I had to install it and symlink it from the firefox folder. What channel are you using? -stable, -beta, or -unstable

First, set up your repos. Do you have rpmfusion set up?
Code:
su -c 'rpm -ivh http://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-stable.noarch.rpm'
su -c 'rpm -ivh http://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/rpmfusion-nonfree-release-stable.noarch.rpm'
su -c 'yum update'
If it says something about needing keys:
Code:
su -c 'rpm --import /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-rpmfusion-*'
Next, you might have the plugin installed. Fedora includes nothing proprietary, so certain codecs (lame/mp3), DVD playback, flash, etc. you need to install. Check your /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/ or /usr/lib64/mozilla/plugins-wrapped folder for libflashplayer.so
If it's there,
Code:
su -c 'mkdir /opt/google/chrome/plugins'
su -c 'ln -s /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libflashplayer.so /opt/google/chrome/plugins/libflashplayer.so'
If the plugin is not there, set up a repo for flash.

Code:
su -c 'rpm -ivh http://linuxdownload.adobe.com/linux/i386/adobe-release-i386-1.0-1.noarch.rpm'
su -c 'rpm --import /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-adobe-linux'
su -c 'yum install alsa-plugins-pulseaudio flash-plugin'
Again, do the above step for symlinking the plugin.

Code:
su -c 'mkdir /opt/google/chrome/plugins'
su -c 'ln -s /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libflashplayer.so /opt/google/chrome/plugins/libflashplayer.so'
You also have an option to try the 64-bit version, or the open source version, called gnash.

After restarting Chrome, type aboutlugins in the address bar to check it's there. If it isn't, you'll need to try forcing a --enable-plugins flag.

Code:
google-chrome –enable-plugins
in console.

Phew. Hope that works.
Edited by esocid - 3/1/11 at 9:37pm
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post #53 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by esocid View Post
2) I suppose you can try the vesa driver. If you want to try it out, you'll have to boot in runlevel 3 and edit your xorg.conf. If you want to do that I'll explain in another post.

3) I had to install it and symlink it from the firefox folder. What channel are you using? -stable, -beta, or -unstable

First, set up your repos. Do you have rpmfusion set up?
Code:
su -c 'rpm -ivh http://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-stable.noarch.rpm'
su -c 'rpm -ivh http://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/rpmfusion-nonfree-release-stable.noarch.rpm'
su -c 'yum update'
If it says something about needing keys:
Code:
su -c 'rpm --import /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-rpmfusion-*'
Next, you might have the plugin installed. Fedora includes nothing proprietary, so certain codecs (lame/mp3), DVD playback, flash, etc. you need to install. Check your /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/ or /usr/lib64/mozilla/plugins-wrapped folder for libflashplayer.so
If it's there,
Code:
su -c 'mkdir /opt/google/chrome/plugins'
su -c 'ln -s /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libflashplayer.so /opt/google/chrome/plugins/libflashplayer.so'
If the plugin is not there, set up a repo for flash.

Code:
su -c 'rpm -ivh http://linuxdownload.adobe.com/linux/i386/adobe-release-i386-1.0-1.noarch.rpm'
su -c 'rpm --import /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-adobe-linux'
su -c 'yum install alsa-plugins-pulseaudio flash-plugin'
Again, do the above step for symlinking the plugin.

Code:
su -c 'mkdir /opt/google/chrome/plugins'
su -c 'ln -s /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libflashplayer.so /opt/google/chrome/plugins/libflashplayer.so'
You also have an option to try the 64-bit version, or the open source version, called gnash.

After restarting Chrome, type aboutlugins in the address bar to check it's there. If it isn't, you'll need to try forcing a --enable-plugins flag.

Code:
google-chrome –enable-plugins
in console.

Phew. Hope that works.
My brain just exploded. Let me read the post, and I'll edit this one.

Alright, so I understood most of what you were saying. I would just like to know what the commands are, and what they do. Such as
Code:
su -c (what does the c stand for? I have been dropping down to root with su -l)
ln -s (I have no idea what this one does, other than copy or move files >.<)
And just to make it clear, repos/rpms are repositories? What are those, exactly?
Edited by Bassdoken - 3/1/11 at 10:19pm
post #54 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassdoken View Post
My brain just exploded. Let me read the post, and I'll edit this one.

Alright, so I understood most of what you were saying. I would just like to know what the commands are, and what they do. Such as
Code:
su -c (what does the c stand for? I have been dropping down to root with su -l)
ln -s (I have no idea what this one does, other than copy or move files >.<)
And just to make it clear, repos/rpms are repositories? What are those, exactly?
su -c will run whatever command is within the single quotes 'like this' and then return to normal user. So you can stack all your commands in there if you want, rather than logging in as root, and logging out when you're done.

ln is the command to make a link. the -s argument is to create a symbolic link (symlink). So basically it's sort of like a shortcut, or a pointer, telling a program to look in this other folder for the file. You could also just copy the file over, but I prefer making symlinks if I don't have to copy it.

Yes, repos are software repositories tailored to your OS. Fedora already has some default ones, but rpmfusion -free and -nonfree are the two pretty essential ones. Yum is fedora's package manager, and the yum install, and yum remove commands will do what they sound like they will. rpm is the RedHat Package Manager, which Red Hat based distros like RHEL, Fedora, CentOS, and OpenSUSE use, possibly some more. Sort of like how Debian based distros use .deb file format.
Edited by esocid - 3/1/11 at 10:41pm
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post #55 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by esocid View Post
su -c will run whatever command is within the single quotes 'like this' and then return to normal user. So you can stack all your commands in there if you want, rather than logging in as root, and logging out when you're done.

ln is the command to make a link. the -s argument is to create a symbolic link (symlink). So basically it's sort of like a shortcut, or a pointer, telling a program to look in this other folder for the file. You could also just copy the file over, but I prefer making symlinks if I don't have to copy it.

Yes, repos are software repositories tailored to your OS. Fedora already has some default ones, but rpmfusion -free and -nonfree are the two pretty essential ones. Yum is fedora's package manager, and the yum install, and yum remove commands will do what they sound like they will. rpm is the RedHat Package Manager, which Red Hat based distros like RHEL, Fedora, CentOS, and OpenSUSE use, possibly some more. Sort of like how Debian based distros use .deb file format.
Ah that makes much more sense now. I really like that ln command.
Alright, I figured su -c was the equivelant of sudo, but I like knowing everything about it. What does the -c argument stand for? lol

I see now. Thanks for clarifying a lot of things for me.
post #56 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassdoken View Post
Ah that makes much more sense now. I really like that ln command.
Alright, I figured su -c was the equivelant of sudo, but I like knowing everything about it. What does the -c argument stand for? lol

I see now. Thanks for clarifying a lot of things for me.
-c just means command. I've never used sudo, and doesn't come enabled in Fedora, so I never bother with it. If you want to use it see the post-installation guide in my sig. I just saw they updated with one for 14.
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post #57 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by esocid View Post
-c just means command. I've never used sudo, and doesn't come enabled in Fedora, so I never bother with it. If you want to use it see the post-installation guide in my sig. I just saw they updated with one for 14.
Like i posted some time ago, he could just use su -
then you stay as root until you log out or close out the terminal window.
That is what i always use for fedora.... Fedora is real nice and i did load it on my laptop for a while but since i use Ubuntu on my desktop exclusively.... i just went back to Ubuntu on the laptop too. I do like Fedora on the laptop.... may have to go back to it again...
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post #58 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAMD_Fan View Post
Like i posted some time ago, he could just use su -
then you stay as root until you log out or close out the terminal window.
That is what i always use for fedora.... Fedora is real nice and i did load it on my laptop for a while but since i use Ubuntu on my desktop exclusively.... i just went back to Ubuntu on the laptop too. I do like Fedora on the laptop.... may have to go back to it again...
That's why I prefer the other way. With su -/su you log in as root and stay root until you logout. su -c is sort of safer, in that you don't accidentally do something as root, or forget to log out of root. Then sudo takes it a little further to set up permission groups.
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post #59 of 72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by esocid View Post
That's why I prefer the other way. With su -/su you log in as root and stay root until you logout. su -c is sort of safer, in that you don't accidentally do something as root, or forget to log out of root. Then sudo takes it a little further to set up permission groups.
Good to know. I'll use su -c instead of getting root.
post #60 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassdoken;12578643 
And just to make it clear, repos/rpms are repositories? What are those, exactly?

Repos/repositories are the... I guess you can call them "master lists" of packages. When you download a package to install through your package manager, the package manager gets it from the repo.

An RPM is a Redhat Package Manager file. If I recall correctly, it's like the Redhat/Fedora equivalent to the .exe installer in windows. It contains the info for the package manager to install the program. In Debian (and its derivatives), the file is a .deb.

I've got Fedora 14 installed in a VM, and it seems pretty sweet. I don't have the time nor an available computer, but I'd like to see if I can run it as my main OS on a desktop. It's well-polished and doesn't seem like it has the quirks it used to that kept me from running it full time way back then (if you look at one of the computers in my profile, it was running F7 at the time eek.gif)
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