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[W8] Windows 8 to have restore to factory setting option and other features - Page 8

post #71 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokkan View Post
fake & gay

an old idea already implemented since windows vista LOL
every laptop in the market that have been through my hands have a recovery partition. usualy F8 or F10 or F12. i usualy press all 3 and wish they work lol
what is a recovery partition? factory reset... puts your computer to your factory values...
how can i do a recovery partition? there are programs that will do that for you and if your skilled enough you can do it in c++
oh and the windows vista and 7 already does a backup image of it which you can copy it to a different partition if you wish :O zomg

*reads a feature for windows 7* OH OH DIRECTX 11 IS FOR WINDOWS 7 ONLY
*turns on laptop with windows vista installed press's the windows button and types dxdiag*
OH OH MY PC MUST BE A WINDOWS 7 IN DISGUISE CUZ ME HAZ DIRECTX 11
features.... they just fooling ya

i seriously cant understand. most of the features that were brought by windows 7 or for this new windows already existed in the so hated windows vista...
Uh, that dx11 is on vista is common knowledge, they arn't hiding or faking anything...

and a reset partion is really only for OEMs, if I wanted to do something similar on my pc, I can't from within windows, or downloading thirdparty ghosting apps, so its not really already implemented.

Windows 7 was a relevantly pointless release, but people were also pointlessly hating vista, and it seems 2 wrongs do make a right because suddenly everyone loves 7
Edited by .:hybrid:. - 3/8/11 at 1:01pm
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post #72 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by r34p3rex View Post
With the rumors of Windows 8 supporting ARM chipsets, wouldn't a new kernel be in order?
Microsoft have been compiling NT 6.1 assemblies since Windows 7 hit RTM in July 2009 (76xx) Most of these post-Windows 7 RTM builds were focused on kernel work only in preparation for Windows 8 Milestone 1 development, which was also under the current 6.1 kernel. From the very start of Milestone 2 - present Milestone 3 they have made the decision to increment to NT kernel version to 6.2 and are now at the stages of early UI and feature-set design/development, therefore all work being done from now until RTM will be based off kernel 6.2

It's highly unlikely for Microsoft to go through two Milestone phases of development and then decide to change the NT kernel version afterwards, this change has to be put in place early on as so many other system components and applications depend upon it. Especially whilst the entire OS is being developed, and also for backward and furure compatibility.

As for your question, Windows wouldn't necessarily need an entirely new kernel for things such as ARM support. The current kernel can be adapted to these types of hardware devices without having to sit and re-design a new kernel model from scratch. Microsoft demonstrated this at CES 2011 earlier this year.

To fully understand exactly how this works you need to know the way in which future versions Windows are developed internally in the Microsoft build labs. It can seem very confusing otherwise. It’s also worth noting that since post-Vista the approach to overall Windows development has changed entirely since being in the hands of Steven Sinofsky as opposed to Jim Allchin who led the development from Windows XP to Windows Vista. Part of this new approach involved kernel versioning; where rather than jumping to the next whole number they'd increment the version number by 0.1. I believe that this has helped with overall system compatibility and has proved to be much less problematic than what was done previously.
Edited by Mitchell7 - 3/8/11 at 2:04pm
post #73 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitchell7 View Post
Microsoft have been compiling NT 6.1 assemblies since Windows 7 hit RTM in July 2009 (76xx) Most of these post-Windows 7 RTM builds were focused on kernel work only in preparation for Windows 8 Milestone 1 development, which was also under the current 6.1 kernel. From the very start of Milestone 2 - present Milestone 3 they have made the decision to increment to NT kernel version to 6.2 and are now at the stages of early UI and feature-set design/development, therefore all work being done from now until RTM will be based off kernel 6.2

It's highly unlikely for Microsoft to go through two Milestone phases of development and then decide to change the NT kernel version afterwards, this change has to be put in place early on as so many other system components and applications depend upon it. Especially whilst the entire OS is being developed, and also for backward and furure compatibility.

As for your question, Windows wouldn't necessarily need an entirely new kernel for things such as ARM support. The current kernel can be adapted to these types of hardware devices without having to sit and re-design a new kernel model from scratch. Microsoft demonstrated this at CES 2011 earlier this year.

To fully understand exactly how this works you need to know the way in which future versions Windows are developed internally in the Microsoft build labs. It can seem very confusing otherwise. It’s also worth noting that since post-Vista the approach to overall Windows development has changed entirely since being in the hands of Steven Sinofsky as opposed to Jim Allchin who led the development from Windows XP to Windows Vista. Part of this new approach involved kernel versioning; where rather than jumping to the next whole number they'd increment the version number by 0.1. I believe that this has helped with overall system compatibility and has proved to be much less problematic than what was done previously.
Interesting.. +rep
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