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Installing Graphics Drivers and creating a Symmlink. Help? - Page 2

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Korlus View Post
Well, it's either symmlink, or I extend my Linux partition. I assume it's possible, but the only guides I found on how were a bit over my head. Can anyone else help a little with telling me how to extend a partition in Linux and get it to "steal" from my regular NTFS partition. I've deleted some things on it to free up enough space to move over a few games at a time, but without the extra space, it just isn't going to work.
Any ideas?
(i'm assuming your windows partition is the first on disk, reverse what i say if it isn't, and if you are in 7 ignore the "hidden" partition, the first real partition should be your installation partition.)

well first thing you want to do is be in windows, and run either windows defrag or a defrag program of your choice (if you use a third party defragger, see if it has an option to consolidate as much of it can to the first of the partition as we will be stealing space from the end.)

now it is possible to do this in windows, but since windows doesn't like other file systems, i'm going to tell you how to do it in linux (this will work in all debian variants such as ubuntu and mint.)

after you have defragged your windows partition, use a livecd/usb of ubuntu/mint. (as you can't resize a active partition in linux, nor can you unmount a system partition such as / or /home to resize it.)

choose "try ubuntu", so it takes you to the live environment.

once loaded (do not mount any of the drives.)

click on system->administration->gparted-partion editor

(now if this is not installed by default, as it might not be in mint, open up a terminal and install it:

sudo apt-get install gparted

it should be in the same location as before.)

once it is started, in the right hand corner, there is a selection box, find the drive the partition is on that you want to resize (if they are both on the primary harddrive, it will be /dev/sda)

locate the windows partition, more than likely if it is win7, it will be /dev/sda2, filesystem will say ntfs. right click on it, and choose "resize/move".

pull out your trusty calculator multiply 1024xNum Of gigs you want to steal, and enter that in the "free space following(MiB)", click resize/move (note: you might have to click in one of the other windows, for gparted to register you have entered a value into the free space field and to activate the resize/move button.)

now you will see a new entry called "unallocated" with the amount of space you stole from the windows partition.

now depending on how you setup you linux partition, depends on how tricky this next section will be.

if the swap partition is before the / partition, follow the red text, if not, skip red text.
if swap is first, right click on the swap partition and choose "swapoff" this unmounts the swap, as the livecd will mount it if it detects it.

next right click on it and choose delete, we will rebuild the swap later, cause we can't extend any partitions that exist after it to use the new space, cause the placement they are on the HDD.


if it is a extended/logical setup for /, right click on the extended partition in the table and choose "resize/move", at the top, just grab the slider and move it towards the end of the gray area. we will need to absorb the raw space into the extended partition to allow the logicals to be able to us it.

if it is not an extended partition, but primary, right click on it, if it is mounted unmount, then click move/resize, in the new window grab the arrow on the left hand side and move it to the end of the gray area.

if you had to remove the swap partition cause it was before the / partition, while in the resize/move, add whatever value you want for swap space to Free space following (MiB). click resize/move, and then setup up a swap partition in the new "unallocated" space.

once done click the green check mark, this is applying the new shema and shifting data, so depending on how fast the HDD and how much space is being shifted, this could be lengthy so set back, flip on the tube and grab a beer.

it is not needed to apply changes immediately after making them, but if you are cautious you can do this to avoid any potential muckups, i've never had large amounts of changes get mucked up before, but use which ever method you feel comfortable with, apply changes (by clicking the green check mark) after each "step" in this guide, or applying them all at once, after making the "psuedo" changes.

if you have any question, ask, as i'm not always noob friendly or even clear
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Bazinga Punk
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ooh shiny!
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon 3440 AsRock P55 extreme Evga 8800 GT 512 MB Gskill Ripjaws 
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Western Digital Blue Antec Khuler 620 Ubuntu 11.10 Asus vw264H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
GIGABYTE KM7600 CORSAIR TX 650 Cooler Master 590 GIGABYTE GM-M6800 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
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250gb Samsung Evo 850 Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 
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post #12 of 13
Just use FAT32 for your games partition if you don't want to copy over. Wine + NTFS has problems with segfaults, various scenarios apparently (edit: apparently old, fixed?). It should work, but if a problem happens you can't complain.

Edit: Oh, and some features won't work on FAT32/NTFS I guess. You might get away with soft linking to the game directory. Note: You'll have to set this up for each game individually.
Edited by mushroomboy - 3/5/11 at 12:29pm
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post #13 of 13
In any RPM based linux like fedora/suse/redhat you can use the following procedure.

Open a terminal, CD to the directory where you have the . run file. make the .run file executable by using the following in the console
#sudo chmod 777 <name of .run file>

Then execute using
#sudo ./<name of .run file> --help
This will give you a list of options to use with the command, Use the one to list packages

Then use the options that you get from that and use the option to build package from the help print out and generate the rpm package.

Now follow these steps carefully
#./<name of .run file>
Install completely. Do not restart. Then
#rpm -ivh ./<generated rpm file>
After installation is done. run
#aticonfig --initial
reboot
You should be okay.
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