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[ZDNet] Forget Intel's Thunderbolt, Wireless USB is the game-changer - Page 5

post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpops91 View Post
5Gbit/s is only going to be enough for low resolution and low color depth screens
That's funny, single link DVI is (including 8b/10b overhead is 4.95 Gbit/s) or with the 8b/10b overhead removed, 3.96 Gbit/s which supports enough bandwidth for a 1920x1200, in other words, enough for the majority of users today who will probably have a 1080p screen.

And who says that no-one will just use two USB ports?
    
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post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Domino View Post
Thunderbolt should replace SATA if anything.
What ever for?
    
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post #43 of 48
Majority of users today... but we need standards for the future, we have stuff that works for today. We should be going past 2560x1600 soon (I hope to God)... but what cable offerings are there besides dual-link DVI at the moment? I think Display Port might support it?

As far as 5Gb/s USB supporting 1920x1200, I doubt it as effective bandwidth with overhead of USB 3 is 3.2Gb/s, which is not enough for 32-bit 60hz. But this is moot because *** does 5Gbs USB have to do with this thread? WUSB is no where near that as I understand???
Edited by rudypoochris - 3/7/11 at 12:20am
post #44 of 48
Im convinced that in 20 years time we'll start seeing mutations as a side effect to constant exposure to wifi signals.

But im just paranoid, while some people say wireless is more then adequate. the truth is that it isnt.

Those who say "I have wireless and it runs fine" have either A: Spent a fortune on getting it runnnig perfectly, buying (relatively) expensive components to ensure they get a great signal 100% of the time.

Or B: Only use the internet for web-browsing.

By relatively expensive, I mean compared to running a cable: £20-£100 for a half-decent wireless adapter or £1.50 for a 20m cable.....
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post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by flamingoyster View Post
Light Peak was the codename, Thunderbolt is going to be the name used in marketing, regarldess of whether it uses optics or copper wires.
That's what they say, as a sop to cover up the failure of Light Peak. Light Peak is destined to be vapour, because no manufacturers wil be offering devices that use it, and consumers will simply use USB because it will remain the lowest cost interface.

I don't think that Thunderbolt will be accepted in the long term, for video interfacing. Intel has been trying to shove VGA off the cliff, simply because they don't control it, and any manufacturer can support VGA without costly license fees. HDMI is an industry wide standard that most manufacturers can easily support, and are now deploying. Thunderbolt, on the other hand, is entirely proprietary, Intel only, and has been brought out only to try to create some kind of monopoly situation. This is exactly what killed FireWire, that even though it had some advantages - manufacturers didn't want to be locked into licenses, and the performance of USB was adequate for the consumer and for enterprise environments.

Quote:
Also, "zero devices that use it" is misleading, since adapters are certainly going to be available for thunderbolt -> usb etc etc.
I am not sure of what advantage Thunderbolt would have if you need a pile of adapters to connect to USB - when one can just go USB without the muss and fuss. I have no idea why someone would want to replace conventional video cables that are dedicated to the task, with a daisy chain of devices that will introduce stuttering and low performance. I do not see Thunderbolt being some kind of next great thing that would be the ideal replacement for current topologies. Nor can I envision any decrease in cost, since Intel will obviously want large fees for licensing. It is nothing more than some shabby monopoly building scheme.

Zero devices still use Thunderbolt - for Apple, it might be the same kind of garbage that the Mezzanine bus was. People are not going to replace their printer with a Thunderbolt version, since current USB is entirely fast enough. And USB remains good enough for external drives, and those that want more speed can still go FireWire, eSATA or NAS. NAS may have other major advantages, being lashed on a network, and accessible from any machine on that network.

Wireless USB will be an evolution, and I can see that being adopted quickly - because it isn't some specious proprietary vapour, but something that all manufacturers will be able to use. And unlike WiFi, it will be approprate for bit oriented devices, like keyboards and mice.
post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mach 5 View Post
Those who say "I have wireless and it runs fine" have either A: Spent a fortune on getting it runnnig perfectly, buying (relatively) expensive components to ensure they get a great signal 100% of the time.

Or B: Only use the internet for web-browsing.

By relatively expensive, I mean compared to running a cable: £20-£100 for a half-decent wireless adapter or £1.50 for a 20m cable.....
There are some fallacies in play. First, no one needs to spend a "fortune" to get a WiFi system up and working. Most WiFi adapters do not require very much configuration, and are almost plug in and go. Sure, you have to set up security, a process not much more complex these days than say, creating and account on OCN. Even on my WiFi, it took me perhaps an hour and a half - mostly because I went directly to dd-wrt, and did some more advanced settings.

WiFi does not require 100% perfect signal - in fact, I think driving too much signal can impede throughput because the receivers become over-saturated with signal. The only impediment is for those trying to drive signals too far, because WiFi is not WiMax. People do have problems with constant connections - but then, people are too lazy to use WiFi scanning software to see that their problem is caused not by WiFi, but because they are on the same default Channel 6 that fifteen of their neighbours are also using.

Most people have WiFi for web browsing, and online things in general. It may not be ideal for something like HTPC or trying to stream high resolution video.

The notion of pricing does not factor in the fact that if you are wired, you will probably be purchasing a hub, router or switch anyways - so the price difference between wired and wireless is not that great. Wired does introduce some potential problems, like computers will have to be in fixed locations, and it is a hassle to connect your friend's machine on an ad hoc basis. Where I work, WiFi is a hassle because it is not just putting up a DLink - we use access points run off of managed switches, and we spend a great deal of time tuning the antenna systems in order to accomplish the telemetry and connectivity we need. Wired is easier and cheaper - but you can't move anything around, and are dependent upon equipment being in entirely fixed locations, and can not grant access to visitors. With WiFi - this is all possible, even if it is more expensive, because of the convenience and flexibility that it brings.

This is similar to home users, where WiFi is not about pushing gigs of data per second, but being able to Google something on a netbook, or having friends over for some gaming.
post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mach 5 View Post
Those who say "I have wireless and it runs fine" have either A: Spent a fortune on getting it runnnig perfectly, buying (relatively) expensive components to ensure they get a great signal 100% of the time.

Or B: Only use the internet for web-browsing.

By relatively expensive, I mean compared to running a cable: £20-£100 for a half-decent wireless adapter or £1.50 for a 20m cable.....
AU$100 on a router, AU$50 for a USB router for my mothers computer, AU$40 for a PCIe one for my computer.

And there's no issues at all, my GTX 275 cost more and I got that second hand, usually get around ~53ms ping on servers I got ~48ms ping with Ethernet.

You need to update how WiFi is, it was really horrid until WiFiG came out and even then they still needed to get the hang of it.
    
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post #48 of 48
Wifi does need to start speeding up. I have been stuck at 3MB/s for the past 5 years. Maybe I just don't know how to do it but I have DD-WRT on all my routers and N speed routers with 40Mhz channels and my 6200AGN still isn't getting over 3MB/s which is about 54g speed - even when it says the link is 144Mbps (which is half of the 300Mbps it should be). Lame.

Correction I get 5MB/s over 144Mbps link. =/
Edited by rudypoochris - 3/8/11 at 12:08am
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