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Unstroke factory short-stroked HDD? - Page 2

post #11 of 14
^ You can ignore a lot of the above. Many HDDs are factory short stroked - an obvious example are the 80GB and 160GB Velociraptors that were just short stroked 150 and 300GB units. This is done for 2 reasons - to increase the drive speeds for random accesses, to minimise the numbers of different platters and actuator types the factories have to make, and to allow the HDD manufacturers to re-use platters that are otherwise damaged.

However it isn't always possible to 'un-short-stroke' them. Using SeaTools (or similar depending on the manufacturer) it *may* be possible to adjust the capacity available, however if you get this wrong you could screw up the drive, so be careful (and be aware of the risks). If the platters are short stroked because of manufacturer defects then you could end up with a useless drive also.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
First, I don't know of any company that short strokes the HDD, so that seems unlikely.
Err...happens all the time. The Samsung F4 320 is a short stoked 700GB platter, for example. Flashing the firmware is a pretty clever idea, but can you be sure that they've low-level formatted the entire platter instead of just half of it?
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by thefreeaccount View Post
Err...happens all the time. The Samsung F4 320 is a short stoked 700GB platter, for example.
Actually it's not (or not really) - it's one side of a 667GB platter.

The slight short stroke is only really to give a round number for the capacity.
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
HDD is currently loaned out to a friend. I'll see what I can do with it.
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