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post #11 of 13
Well it depends really. The best way IMO is to look at what kind of overclocks people are getting with your card, bearing in mind that not all are the same.

The you can increases the core speed to something that you think is reasonable, based on comparison to others and if it fails bump up the voltage a little. That way you should have an idea of what is causing artifacts, you'll be able to see if you are setting the core speed too high

You could always just cheat though if you want the maximum overclock at the maximum safe voltage. Just turn the voltage up and work from there. Although I would advise against that as its better to turn the core speed up and then bring the voltage up to match it if you need.

EDIT:

This thread has examples of overclocks that you can use as a basis

http://www.overclock.net/nvidia/8919...ng-thread.html
Edited by mib2347 - 3/18/11 at 1:47am
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post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks i'll take a look at that. So if you get artefacts it doesn't mean necessarily that your Overclock is too high?

It may also mean that your card isn't getting enough voltage?

But what if you give too much voltage would you also get artefacts? or will it simply crash.

I think it's important to know this to recognise, and adjust.
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post #13 of 13
Well you won't get artifacts from too high voltage, at least I've never heard of that happening. But yes, you will if the core is set too high, or the voltage is too low.

You'll get to a point where you need to increase the voltage a lot more just for a little gain. For example, my gtx 480 runs at 700mhz with 1050mv, and it will do 800mhz with 1063mv (which is the smallest increment I can increase it by) But it takes 1137mv (or around that much) to do 849mhz.

So there will be a point when you can't get much more out of it by increasing the voltage. I advise that you document all the successful attempts though, because you may decide that you want to run it with a more modest overclock rather than the absolute maximum, because the lower voltage overclock is still decent and uses a lot less power which = less noise and heat but still more powerful than stock clocks
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