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Color Calibrator Suggestions - Page 3

post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booty Warrior View Post
Hmm, is the difference big enough to warrant the extra cost? That's about as much as a LaCie.
On an IPS monitor what CEDPro does for shadows is amazing and I think that CEDPro with the Sypder3 is worth the $300. You will pay $200 for an i1D2 with X-Rite's software and I do think that CEDPro is worth the extra $100. You are really paying the extra $100 for the software, not for the Sypder3.
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post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by IEATFISH View Post
On another note, I hear it recommended to recalibrate often, even as much as weekly. IN this way, it would be advantageous to own one.

Does anyone know what the 'future-proofing' of these tools are? How long will they be relevant if I were to buy one?
As long as computers have USB ports they will always be relevant. You'll have to send it in for calibration about once a year (yes, you do need to calibrate the calibrator), but other than that they don't become obsolete or anything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Booty Warrior View Post
Anyone have any experience with HCFR?

It's apparently a freeware program designed and updated by other professional graphic artists. Some people on a photography-enthusiasts board I found swear by it.
That software is absolutely amazing, definitely worth it. But there's a catch, which is that you really have to spend the time to learn how to take advantage of all the information it gives you.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Booty Warrior View Post
Edit: In researching the X-rite I came across this review left on Amazon:

...

If that's true, that makes it a no-go for the U2711. I don't even have the monitor yet and it's already a pain
You need to understand that there's a HUGE difference between devices like the spyder3 and i1D2 and devices like the Colormunki and i1Pro.

The cheaper ones are colorimeters. They have filters in front of their sensors, that filter out all light except the wavelengths (+/- a bit) of the Red, Blue, and Green primaries, with the sensors only able to detect brightness. They have only those 3 measurement points throughout the entire visible spectrum.

The more expensive ones are spectrophotometers. They can detect any wavelength of light whatsoever. And the more expensive ones are definitely more accurate. In the case of the i1Pro and Colormunki, they both measure in 10nm steps, but the i1Pro can scan at 200Hz as opposed to the 50Hz of the Colormunki (among other things), so it's a lot more sensitive to changes.

So what does this all mean to you? Colorimeters have to have their filters specially designed for their application. When said application is to be cheap monitor calibrators, their filters are chosen as the primaries of the sRGB color space because that's what nearly everyone uses. Wide gamut screens have primaries that are of completely different wavelengths, and have much tighter tolerances, so standard colorimeters can't measure them as accurately.

All that being said, the biggest problem with colorimeters in practical usage seems to be a high tolerance for variance between pucks. If you bought 5 different Spyder3's, you'd end up with 5 different results. That's why you keep hearing mixed reviews on them. But all in all, the i1D2 still seems to be the most reliable and most accurate one out there.
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post #23 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manyak View Post
As long as computers have USB ports they will always be relevant. You'll have to send it in for calibration about once a year (yes, you do need to calibrate the calibrator), but other than that they don't become obsolete or anything.



That software is absolutely amazing, definitely worth it. But there's a catch, which is that you really have to spend the time to learn how to take advantage of all the information it gives you.




You need to understand that there's a HUGE difference between devices like the spyder3 and i1D2 and devices like the Colormunki and i1Pro.

The cheaper ones are colorimeters. They have filters in front of their sensors, that filter out all light except the wavelengths (+/- a bit) of the Red, Blue, and Green primaries, with the sensors only able to detect brightness. They have only those 3 measurement points throughout the entire visible spectrum.

The more expensive ones are spectrophotometers. They can detect any wavelength of light whatsoever. And the more expensive ones are definitely more accurate. In the case of the i1Pro and Colormunki, they both measure in 10nm steps, but the i1Pro can scan at 200Hz as opposed to the 50Hz of the Colormunki (among other things), so it's a lot more sensitive to changes.

So what does this all mean to you? Colorimeters have to have their filters specially designed for their application. When said application is to be cheap monitor calibrators, their filters are chosen as the primaries of the sRGB color space because that's what nearly everyone uses. Wide gamut screens have primaries that are of completely different wavelengths, and have much tighter tolerances, so standard colorimeters can't measure them as accurately.

All that being said, the biggest problem with colorimeters in practical usage seems to be a high tolerance for variance between pucks. If you bought 5 different Spyder3's, you'd end up with 5 different results. That's why you keep hearing mixed reviews on them. But all in all, the i1D2 still seems to be the most reliable and most accurate one out there.
Wow, thanks for the info. I'd rep you if you weren't a mod

The spectrophotometers are a bit out of my budget atm. The i1Pro actually costs more than I paid for my monitor, so... yeah, I'll pass on that for now.

What's your opinion on the LaCie Blue Eye Pro? TFTcentral seems to use it in all of their reviews and it's relatively cheap compared to the i1Pro etc.
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booty Warrior View Post
Wow, thanks for the info. I'd rep you if you weren't a mod

The spectrophotometers are a bit out of my budget atm. The i1Pro actually costs more than I paid for my monitor, so... yeah, I'll pass on that for now.

What's your opinion on the LaCie Blue Eye Pro? TFTcentral seems to use it in all of their reviews and it's relatively cheap compared to the i1Pro etc.


AFAIK The Blue Eye is the same as the i1D2, just with different software. But either one of them is a good choice, and it's pretty much the only colorimeter I ever recommend .
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post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manyak View Post


AFAIK The Blue Eye is the same as the i1D2, just with different software. But either one of them is a good choice, and it's pretty much the only colorimeter I ever recommend .
I guess I'll probably wind up grabbing an i1D2. Out of curiosity, do you know what the difference is between that and the ? The LT seems to be $50-75 cheaper, but as with most things in the pc world, I'm assuming you get what you pay for.

Also, since you have a U3011, do you switch it to sRGB mode for movies/games etc? Or does it handle those well in it's natural gamut after calibration? I'm asking because I read in a few reviews that the U2711 and U3011 have some slight banding in sRGB mode, but tend to over-saturate images if left in their default settings.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booty Warrior View Post
I guess I'll probably wind up grabbing an i1D2. Out of curiosity, do you know what the difference is between that and the i1D LT? The LT seems to be $50-75 cheaper, but as with most things in the pc world, I'm assuming you get what you pay for.

Also, since you have a U3011, do you switch it to sRGB mode for movies/games etc? Or does it handle those well in it's natural gamut after calibration? I'm asking because I read in a few reviews that the U2711 and U3011 have some slight banding in sRGB mode, but tend to over-saturate images if left in their default settings.
Yes, I run it in sRGB outside of photoshop/lightroom/etc. SOMETIMES games look nice oversaturated...when they're really cartoony...but that's it. That's one drawback of the ZR30w by the way - even though it's got low input lag it doesn't have an sRGB mode. Either way, when you get your monitor you can see what the difference is for yourself.

And that one is also the same puck but with a bunch of settings in the software locked down.
Edited by Manyak - 3/9/11 at 7:08am
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